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Sentinel brewhouse and eatery

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The top end is IPA's, Saisons, Stouts, Sours.

 

Typically using imported hops and with an Abv over 5.5%

 

Surprised you dont know all this since you seem to be expert on everything.

 

Bless.

 

What do they go for then - how many would people drink typically?

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they were based in "owwwww muuuch!" Sheffield.

 

 

Pretty sure same operation would have worked in any other city.

 

Prob failed here due to the Tories and austerity cuts...

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Pretty sure same operation would have worked in any other city.

 

Prob failed here due to the Tories and austerity cuts...

 

Why’s that then?

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Pretty sure same operation would have worked in any other city.

 

Prob failed here due to the Tories and austerity cuts...

 

I doubt it. The people who are willing to pay 4-5 pound plus for a beer mostly aren't interested in drinking traditional British bitters and sub 4% pales. The folks who do drink that kind of beer generally wouldn't pay that kind of price for them, so would go elsewhere. I know on the odd time I went in, I drank the guest beers, as the stuff brewed on site didn't interest me at all, and the few I tried were no more than average.

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£4.50 for a pint of beer and people are saying they should have gone for the top-end of the market - what’s that then?

 

Top end of the market is beers worth well over £4.50, that doesn't mean that a beer costing less than that is better value. I've paid north of a tenner for a beer many times, but I wouldn't pay £4.50 for a bog standard bitter.

 

Same as a shot of 25 year old Macallan will cost you well into double figures but a fiver for a Famous Grouse isn't VFM.

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The place had promise but never fulfilled imho. Great food, ok beer and an interesting set-up. However, with all the non-payments to tradesmen after the first failure, a lot of folk were rather dubious about the place.

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Top end of the market is beers worth well over £4.50, that doesn't mean that a beer costing less than that is better value. I've paid north of a tenner for a beer many times, but I wouldn't pay £4.50 for a bog standard bitter.

 

Same as a shot of 25 year old Macallan will cost you well into double figures but a fiver for a Famous Grouse isn't VFM.

 

I'm aware that prices can be ridiculous but is it really a viable business plan to sell beer in a bar at £10+ a pint?

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I'm aware that prices can be ridiculous but is it really a viable business plan to sell beer in a bar at £10+ a pint?

 

 

To only sell £10 pints, no. To offer them as part of the range, definitely.

 

Again, there's a big difference between having expensive beer and having your beer expensive. If you've got an imported barrel aged imperial stout that works out at a tenner, people who want it will pay it, crucially if they want it they'll end up paying a tenner wherever they have it. Whereas selling trad bitter at 4 quid won't interest the people who buy the imported stout, and people who want trad bitter can get a trad bitter just as good for 3 quid elsewhere. The two drinks are not comparable to each other at all, but you can compare the same beer between different venues

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I'm aware that prices can be ridiculous but is it really a viable business plan to sell beer in a bar at £10+ a pint?

 

I've seen kegs of imperial stout, selling at the equivalent of 13 quid a pint (but most people would drink it by the half or third), sell out the same day they put them on. So yeah, I'd say it is, as long as that's not the only thing you're selling

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Thing is there are two groups customers. There are those who just want a booze dispensing venue to meet friends and aren't fussy about what they drink - so a standard brown bitter or session pale that's easy drinking perfectly fine, those drinkers wouldn't expect to pay much more than £3 a pint though.

 

Then there are the beer geeks, trying new beers is part of the social occasion, they demand more interesting beers with bold flavours and quality ingredients. They are willing to pay more for something special and understand strong or extremely flavoured beers are meant to be enjoyed in smaller measures.

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Absolutely spot on Andy, sadly Sentinel fell between the two camps, providing neither 'market priced' session beer for the social drinkers nor exciting/stupidly unbalanced (delete according to viewpoint) beers to the beer geeks. The core beers were too expensive for the former and the specials were too mainstream for the latter.

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Absolutely spot on Andy, sadly Sentinel fell between the two camps, providing neither 'market priced' session beer for the social drinkers nor exciting/stupidly unbalanced (delete according to viewpoint) beers to the beer geeks. The core beers were too expensive for the former and the specials were too mainstream for the latter.

 

I get you now.

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