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What do people think of the Lecturers' industrial action?

Do you think Lecturers industrial action is justified?  

79 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you think Lecturers industrial action is justified?

    • Yes
      39
    • No
      40


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The industrial action has been suspended tonight. Although the unions rejected the 13.1% offer outright, they finally did a ballot of the members and it has been accepted. Award boards should now happen and most students will graduate on time.

 

The ballot has not yet taken place, although the action has been suspended. I think that the ballot will be a formality though and that the offer will be accepted.

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The ballot has not yet taken place, although the action has been suspended. I think that the ballot will be a formality though and that the offer will be accepted.

 

Oops, they ought to sack the internet journalist at Sky News, he didn't word it very well :rolleyes:

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/5052730.stm

 

The action has been suspended, and the Union will recommend to its members that they accept almost exactly the same pay deal they were offered last week.

 

There is a major difference that other people don't seem to be picking up on and that is the independent review that is part of this new offer. This was what the AUt and NATFE were asking for last week but UCEA outright rejected it. They ahve come back to the table agreeing to it if the AUT will check with it's members.

 

This is a strike that seems to be a win-win scenario in the end. Students will gett their degree, the universities won't get sued and the AUT got a deal with a promise of potentially more based on the review. Even if the pay is still not indicative of the way pay has risen ove the last 15 years, the independent review will show if the money is there, and it should be going to lecturers, not VCs and other SMT members.

 

Wilf

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This is what the UCU had to say last night (UCU = AUT+NATHE);

 

 

This evening, UCU has announced a pay deal, to be balloted, and suspension of

the action from midnight. The details are at

 

http://www.ucu.org.uk/media/pdf/l/k/2006payagreement06-09.pdf

 

and UCU commentary is at

 

http://www.ucu.org.uk/media/pdf/r/4/he2006payoffer_commentary.pdf

 

As you will see this is, in monetary terms, basically the nominal 10%+ deal

staged in four steps over two years, and with a modified understanding about

the third year element based on a 2.5 minimum, but less set in stone than in

the previous formula.

 

However there is no explicit guarantee of repayment of docked pay, so we ask you

to delay submitting any marks you may be holding, while we clarify the

University's intention to make full repayments.

 

If you have received an individual letter confirming that you are being

pay-docked to contact the committee on aut-payback@shef.ac.uk, so that we know

exactly who we are representing in this regard.

 

Furthermore, we ask any members who may have marked and parked not to rush marks

in immediately anyway, as this may put great pressure on members who have

followed ASOS fully and have not yet marked what may be a considerable volume

of coursework and exam scripts. The agreement in any case includes

acknowledgement that resumption of marking will take time and require

Œnecessary rescheduling‚, so please consult with other members in your

department. No-one should be left exposed because they have followed AUT advice

strictly. Any member who feels that unfair pressure is being placed on them to

rush marks in should contact the Committee. Remember that your working week is

35 hours.

 

The deal also includes the option for HEIs facing financial difficulties and

redundancies to delay implementation of any of the (five) stages of the deal,

by up to 11 months. We expect the University management to make its position

clear on this before members have to vote on the deal.

 

On behalf of SUCU and SAUT before it we thank all members who have sustained the

action thus far, often in conditions of extraordinary pressure and sacrifice of

income.

 

The AGM on Thursday offers the opportunity to discuss the deal and the ballot,

and with any consequences we need to deal with collectively in the short term,

and to begin the longer term analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of our

organization that we need to build on or deal with, respectively, in the

future.

 

SUCU Committee

6 June 2006

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My view on this strike/action is that you shouldn't get paid for work you didn't do. If you choose not to work in order to make a protest then you shouldn't think that you will get paid for that time.

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My view on this strike/action is that you shouldn't get paid for work you didn't do. If you choose not to work in order to make a protest then you shouldn't think that you will get paid for that time.

 

As with many of your posts, this is overly simplistic. The work has been done or is being done and therefore there will be no 'loss of production', to use an industrial term.

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My view on this strike/action is that you shouldn't get paid for work you didn't do. If you choose not to work in order to make a protest then you shouldn't think that you will get paid for that time.

 

They didn't stop working - they just stopped marking students' work. There is still plenty of work to do and lecturers were all still in work doing it. The action short of a strike was never going to result in the students work not being marked - just a delay. In fact, most did mark the work because they foresaw the situation that has now arisen. The award boards are due to be held next week and now the action has been called off they would have had to mark hundreds of exam papers within a few days. What actually happened is that most marked the work but have not submitted the marks, which is what they are now going to do and the students actually won't have been affected.

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As with many of your posts, this is overly simplistic. The work has been done or is being done and therefore there will be no 'loss of production', to use an industrial term.

 

If they did everything theye were supposed to, then what was all the fuss about? I haven't followed it closely, if at all, but I assumed they were taking some kind of industrial action, possibly even strikes. If you take action then this usually implies missing some tasks you would otherwise have carried out.

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If they did everything theye were supposed to, then what was all the fuss about? I haven't followed it closely, if at all, but I assumed they were taking some kind of industrial action, possibly even strikes. If you take action then this usually implies missing some tasks you would otherwise have carried out.

 

Well, lets offer a simple analogy. Say a lathe operator producing widgets decides to take industrial action. Instead of downing tools, he continues to produce widgets but hoards them instead of handing them over (or works extra to produce the exact number of widgets required by the time the customer needs them). There is no loss of production and the customers get what they want. Students around the country will graduate as normal this summer thanks to the sterling efforts of lecturers in ensuring that there is no lacuna in academic widgets due to the industrial action.

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If lecturers' pay is to be docked for not marking, then they shouldn't mark at all. Let the VCs find someone else to do the job we're not getting paid for while we take a holiday!

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Well, lets offer a simple analogy. Say a lathe operator producing widgets decides to take industrial action. Instead of downing tools, he continues to produce widgets but hoards them instead of handing them over (or works extra to produce the exact number of widgets required by the time the customer needs them). There is no loss of production and the customers get what they want. Students around the country will graduate as normal this summer thanks to the sterling efforts of lecturers in ensuring that there is no lacuna in academic widgets due to the industrial action.

 

A nice analogy LordChav but alas, it's your turn to be guilty of being over simplistic. Your analogy holds true for those AUT members who adopted the "mark and park" approach, which admittedly many did (incidentally often under pressure from the unions not to do so, as happened to union members in my department). However, a fair percentage of AUT members followed the ASOS to the letter and refused to undergo any assessment activities whatsoever. This has meant, in the past fortnight in particular, extra workload for either non-union members or union members prepared to break the strike to see the students graduate. To follow your analogy, in some cases the lathe operator has in fact refused to make the widgets and others have had to step in to make his quota too. It is these individuals that are under threat of having their pay docked.

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