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Hyde Park Flats Question?

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My friend moved to the Hyde Park in the 60s dacre row I think that's how you spell it we had a lot of fun playing on the different landings and football outside.

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when the flats were empty they used them to house,the world student games students, i think.

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I worked with a man who got one of the flats when they were first built, they were moved out of some back to back house that were being knocking down and he and his family were over the moon with there's.

I don't think it was the flats that were the problem ....

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Very impressive photo so much housing begs the question why did they demolish it ?

 

I left Sheffield in 1986 but from what I recall, some problems with Hyde Park Flats , -the people that lived there were not the problem- was the services to the buildings i.e: Gas, Electric, Telephone, that the engineers from those utility companies refused to work in the service ducts (in particular the phone people) as they were vermin/ insect infested. The flats-finished in 1965- were built on top of one of Sheffield's main refuse dumps. Gleadless Valley and the Shirecliffe end of Parkwood Springs (not rebuilt) being the others.

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I left Sheffield in 1986 but from what I recall, some problems with Hyde Park Flats , -the people that lived there were not the problem- was the services to the buildings i.e: Gas, Electric, Telephone, that the engineers from those utility companies refused to work in the service ducts (in particular the phone people) as they were vermin/ insect infested. The flats-finished in 1965- were built on top of one of Sheffield's main refuse dumps. Gleadless Valley and the Shirecliffe end of Parkwood Springs (not rebuilt) being the others.

 

Didn't realise that Hyde Park was built on a rubbish dump did this effect the complex in later years ?

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Didn't realise that Hyde Park was built on a rubbish dump did this effect the complex in later years ?

 

I don't know the answer to that but if you lived on the 'big block' you only had ants to deal with. If you lived on the block that included Derwent you had cockroaches to deal with.

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when the flats were empty they used them to house,the world student games students, i think.

 

I worked on the flats when they refurbished them for the games , think it was around 89/90

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My Mum had to move out of them in '88 so you are right with your dates

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I was once told in a lecture that the Hyde park tower, suffered from very poor construction with the windows not matching up properly with the floors. Some of the upper floors had windows that were set too low in the outside walls.

whereas Park Hill was built to a much better standard and why it was seen to be worth refurbishing.

 

I have made a personal study of Britain's post war tower blocks and it is well known that some of the later built examples were built very quickly to a poor standard by inexperienced contractors and this is why there were problems such as the Ronan Point Collapse.

It has to be remembered that the reason for building concrete tower blocks in the 1950s and 60s was to relieve the housing crisis. There were thousands of lost houses due to war time bombing and many people still lived in tiny back to backs. The governments in this era pushed forward these schemes to get people out of the old poor quality housing so the areas could be redeveloped.

 

Most tower blocks were only designed to be used for 15 to 20 years, they were a medium term measure to house lots of people until new suburbs could be developed at the edges of town where they could have gardens and fresh air.

This was exactly what happened in Sheffield with the expansion into North Derbyshire and the Crystal Peak townships.

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I was once told in a lecture that the Hyde park tower, suffered from very poor construction with the windows not matching up properly with the floors. Some of the upper floors had windows that were set too low in the outside walls.

whereas Park Hill was built to a much better standard and why it was seen to be worth refurbishing.

 

I have made a personal study of Britain's post war tower blocks and it is well known that some of the later built examples were built very quickly to a poor standard by inexperienced contractors and this is why there were problems such as the Ronan Point Collapse.

It has to be remembered that the reason for building concrete tower blocks in the 1950s and 60s was to relieve the housing crisis. There were thousands of lost houses due to war time bombing and many people still lived in tiny back to backs. The governments in this era pushed forward these schemes to get people out of the old poor quality housing so the areas could be redeveloped.

 

Most tower blocks were only designed to be used for 15 to 20 years, they were a medium term measure to house lots of people until new suburbs could be developed at the edges of town where they could have gardens and fresh air.

This was exactly what happened in Sheffield with the expansion into North Derbyshire and the Crystal Peak townships.

 

Wasn't the Ronan Point collapse because of a gas explosion?

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There were several reasons for the collapse at Ronan Point.

1) The panels that held the building together were not properly secured

2) A tower block had gas installed (not done any longer in the UK)

3) Something about - "The cooker which was the source of the leak should not have been installed in a high rise" - or something.

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I never, thinking about it, went into a flat on Hyde Park, where there was a gas cooker

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