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Sheffield Tomato Dip


happyaslarry

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This may be going back a bit but does anyone know of a Sheffield café which still does the tomato dip, in which a bacon sandwich is briefly dipped? And is there anything more to it than a pureed tin of tomatoes? I have found this reference on the Forum from 2014

"For me I don't think you can beat a crispy smoked bacon on thick sliced tiger bread with tomato dip! To make the tomato dip really tasty, add a couple of fresh mint leaves (chopped) half a cube of Oxo, pinch of salt, crack black pepper and a splash of Hendersons (or Worcester sauce if preferred)... " This suggests a bit of thought is involved.

And is it solely confined to Sheffield?

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  • 9 months later...

To me, a tom dip was always just a breadcake dipped in the tomato. No bacon or anything.

Any cooked sandwich shop should do it if asked, but back in the day it was the cheapest thing on the menu.

 

The reason sandwich shop tomato tasted so different to the tinned toms at home was the way the water evaporated over time leaving a rich thick sauce.

If I do tinned toms at home to put on a sandwich I always simmer until I get the same consistency :-)

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To me, a tom dip was always just a breadcake dipped in the tomato. No bacon or anything.

Any cooked sandwich shop should do it if asked, but back in the day it was the cheapest thing on the menu.

 

The reason sandwich shop tomato tasted so different to the tinned toms at home was the way the water evaporated over time leaving a rich thick sauce.

If I do tinned toms at home to put on a sandwich I always simmer until I get the same consistency :-)

 

Yes a Tomato dip is just that, no garnishings or anything elaborate. It was a cheap breakfast for many Sheffield worker's.

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I agree with andrejuan. It's the consistency that makes all the difference. Tomato dip is basically just ordinary tinned tomatos, simmered down very, very slowly, into a rich, concentrated consistency. All I add is a pinch of salt, a grind of pepper and a pinch of brown sugar - just a tiny pinch between my thumb and finger- then I slowly reduce it over a very low heat until it's rich and thick.

 

Spread a bit on your bread or toast when you're making a bacon/sausage/fried egg sarnie for Sunday breakfast - or add a bit of olive oil, a bit of minced garlic, a bit of finely chopped anchovy and a bit of fresh basil/oregano (or both), to make a lovely tomato-based sauce for your home-made pizza and pasta dishes.

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