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Tv repair worth it?

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Well I for one will not be poking around with it when I don't know what I'm doing! But interesting views, thanks. Upshot is, avoid Bush in the future. Got it ;)

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It's amazing how many people with no electrical knowledge go poking around with a big screwdriver.

 

And that's exactly what you've just encouraged them to do.

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And that's exactly what you've just encouraged them to do.

 

How in the hell did you come to that conclusion? I pointed out what takes place, not what should take place.

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Caps get blamed for everything and its very rarely the cause

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A quid or so for capacitors from Bardwells and the ability to use a soldering iron and absorb info from a youtube vid.

 

Take precautions though, they can give you a right belt if you don't drain down.

 

This sounds to me very much like an encouragement to have a go rather than pay someone who knows what they're doing.

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Hi all,

 

Sorry if this is in the wrong place. Just wondered if anyone knew whether it was worth repairing a large 40" TV (which just seems now to suddenly not want to turn on that's all). The light flashes but nobody is home! :confused:

 

Just getting the feelers out on whether it might be worth trying to repair it(might just simply be the switch or something) or simply investing in a new one. It is admittedly about 4 years old now. Do people still come out to repair these days or do you have to take them to a repair shop?

cheers

 

Just a thought-if I turn my tv off with the remote (which leaves it in standby mode), but then later decide to turn the tv off completeley by using the on/off switch the following happens. When I next want to watch tv, I turn it on at the on/off switch and all it does is flashes like yours. This is because it has been left in standby mode prior to being turned off. Could that be the problem with yours?

 

Have yo tried using the remote to turn the tv on after turning the tv on with the on/off switch??

Edited by Janus

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Just a thought-if I turn my tv off with the remote (which leaves it in standby mode), but then later decide to turn the tv off completeley by using the on/off switch the following happens. When I next want to watch tv, I turn it on at the on/off switch and all it does is flashes like yours. This is because it has been left in standby mode prior to being turned off. Could that be the problem with yours?

 

Have yo tried using the remote to turn the tv on after turning the tv on with the on/off switch??

 

Yes, have tried turning it on/off by the remote and also the switch on the side of the tv loads of times, also unplugged it and left it a while and then tried again. Just keeps flashing at me - the cheeky bugger :hihi:

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Well I for one will not be poking around with it when I don't know what I'm doing! But interesting views, thanks. Upshot is, avoid Bush in the future. Got it ;)

 

Do a total reset on that TV before you make any decisions. Almost everything now is controlled by software as well hardware and that can end up getting stuck needing to be reset.

 

Edit: read somewhere some bush also have problems with power regulator. At least in old days when electronics used relays for almost everything it was easy to sort the problem.

Edited by dutch

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You're really selling it there:

 

"It's a cheap and easy fix, as long as you don't blow your arm off with a huge electric shock"

I'm well used to 'dangerous' CRT anodes with 20kvolt residuals and, if the OP's TV is not a CRT, there's very little chance of any "huge electric shock", unless one is dumb enough to leave the TV plugged in the mains during the repair (which, of course, I'm sure noone is).

 

cassity is right as a matter of general principle: most consumer electronics with a capacitor-related failure simply require a basic aptitude with a screwdriver (take off covers, put it back on), a soldering iron and pump (take off old capacitor, put in new one), and buying the right replacement at Maplins, eBay or somesuch.

 

The trick is in isolating the fault in the first place and, as many have posted on here, these days there's frequently a forum post, a Youtube vid or a similar online resource to be found if you search right. Alternatively, or in addition, get a cheap tester and learn to use it - it's a useful skill.

 

I've fixed all sorts of AV items that way, that would otherwise have ended up in a skip - but for the sake of a £0.50 component, a bit of time and not that much skill at all.

 

Save the planet, one electronic item at a time :thumbsup:

Edited by L00b

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Do a total reset on that TV before you make any decisions. Almost everything now is controlled by software as well hardware and that can end up getting stuck needing to be reset.

 

Edit: read somewhere some bush also have problems with power regulator. At least in old days when electronics used relays for almost everything it was easy to sort the problem.

 

How do you do a total reset? Is that easy enough to do for the simple minded? :D

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Save the planet, one electronic item at a time :thumbsup:

 

Very very true, too much waste is dumped that only needed a simple repair.

 

---------- Post added 01-12-2015 at 09:19 ----------

 

How do you do a total reset? Is that easy enough to do for the simple minded? :D

 

For that you need to check the manual, if you don't have one there will be manuals online. I don't know the model number of your TV. Put the model number down and I have a little online search for you what other people done with same problem.

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I'm well used to 'dangerous' CRT anodes with 20kvolt residuals and, if the OP's TV is not a CRT, there's very little chance of any "huge electric shock", unless one is dumb enough to leave the TV plugged in the mains during the repair (which, of course, I'm sure noone is).

 

cassity is right as a matter of general principle: most consumer electronics with a capacitor-related failure simply require a basic aptitude with a screwdriver (take off covers, put it back on), a soldering iron and pump (take off old capacitor, put in new one), and buying the right replacement at Maplins, eBay or somesuch.

 

The trick is in isolating the fault in the first place and, as many have posted on here, these days there's frequently a forum post, a Youtube vid or a similar online resource to be found if you search right. Alternatively, or in addition, get a cheap tester and learn to use it - it's a useful skill.

 

I've fixed all sorts of AV items that way, that would otherwise have ended up in a skip - but for the sake of a £0.50 component, a bit of time and not that much skill at all.

 

Save the planet, one electronic item at a time :thumbsup:

 

 

You say no one is dumb enough to do it with it turned on but I'll put money on the fact there is plenty of people dumb enough to do just that.

 

Also the main dc filter cap will hold charge for a wee while and may not kill a fit adult but is going to hurt.

 

Telling people on a forum who you don't know to take apart a TV and fix it is stupid. You don't know the skill set of the person, you don't know if they are electrically safe they probably don't even know what a capacitor does!

 

My advice would be to spend time learning first before jumping into things, as in for an hobby or to make ends meet not to fix your TV that you know doubt want fixing asap

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