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Day to day supply cover in schools.

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No. I'm suggesting the behaviour of students is down to the parents. Teachers go into the profession to teach not crowd control.

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Are you suggesting that all teachers have been forced into teaching by their parents?

 

I suggest that you are either a very poor troll or that you are a little intellectually-challenged.

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No. I'm suggesting the behaviour of students is down to the parents. Teachers go into the profession to teach not crowd control.

 

Parents are not present at school during school hours. Would it help today's weak teachers if the parents dropped everything, and came and did the teacher's job for them?

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What do you mean what are you supposed to do???? You're not responsible for 'doing' anything for me so take a step back on that one.

 

My point I shall explain AGAIN is that as a profession they have no need to moan, they don't get terrible pay, they get plenty of holidays and they don't have to work long hours for the majority of the year. I didn't ask for you to explain about training days whether or not they are during the very lengthy holidays they have, or whether they are penalised for striking - of course they should be, anyone else would be given their first warning if they decided to not go into work.

 

Please accept that you won't change the opinions of many many people in this country who feel teachers are really not in a position to complain about their jobs as they do.

 

You really have no idea what teachers do. First of all they work stupidly long hours. My brother is a maths teacher and he pulls 12 hour days Monday to Friday and works a half day Saturday to give children extra maths tuition if they want it. This isn't at a private school either but at a London academy. He doesn't get paid overtime, he does it because he wants the best for his students.

 

He deserves all the holidays he gets in my opinion.

 

Also, asking people to do training in their own time is one of the most stupid things I have ever heard. I am not a teacher but get 45 days plus the bank holidays off and there is no way I would attend training in my own time. Just because your job probably rates poorly against others in terms and conditions doesn't mean we should suffer like you. Maybe you should have studied harder at school and done more with your life. Sounds like pure jealousy from what you are saying.

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Neither. Teachers these days are not up to the job. The kids are in control - I kid you not.

 

Yes some of the children can be dreadful. They haven't been taught any of the basic rules, or manners, at home. Too many parents expect the teachers to do it for them - and then they complain like mad when the school tries to actually discipline their obnoxious children.

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You really have no idea what teachers do. First of all they work stupidly long hours. My brother is a maths teacher and he pulls 12 hour days Monday to Friday and works a half day Saturday to give children extra maths tuition if they want it. This isn't at a private school either but at a London academy. He doesn't get paid overtime, he does it because he wants the best for his students.

 

He deserves all the holidays he gets in my opinion.

 

Also, asking people to do training in their own time is one of the most stupid things I have ever heard. I am not a teacher but get 45 days plus the bank holidays off and there is no way I would attend training in my own time. Just because your job probably rates poorly against others in terms and conditions doesn't mean we should suffer like you. Maybe you should have studied harder at school and done more with your life. Sounds like pure jealousy from what you are saying.

 

 

Just so you know I actually have a degree, a masters degree and hold down a very good and well paid job with good holidays. I own my own home outright with no mortgage, have two cars which I also own outright with no finance or loans and own property in Dubai and Tenerife, so you couldn't be more wrong.....oh and I'm not even mid-thirties so I've got plenty of time to enjoy my life!!

 

I so thoroughly enjoy it when people couldn't be more wrong like you are with your statement!!!

Edited by ll49

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I wouldn't pay today's teachers in buttons - seriously.

 

Me neither. The exchange rate is terrible. I'd pay them in pounds sterling.

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Just so you know I actually have a degree, a masters degree and hold down a very good and well paid job with good holidays. I own my own home outright with no mortgage, have two cars which I also own outright with no finance or loans and own property in Dubai and Tenerife, so you couldn't be more wrong.....oh and I'm not even mid-thirties so I've got plenty of time to enjoy my life!!

 

I so thoroughly enjoy it when people couldn't be more wrong like you are with your statement!!!

 

Sounds like you owe a lot of your success to a good education there! What a shame you are so quick to lambast the profession that helped you on your journey.

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It's amazing how many parents throw their children through the doors at 7.30 when the teachers are arriving so they can be fed and entertained over breakfast, enjoy a solid lunch and then engage in every after school activity going before being picked up (if they don't forget) in the early evening, to return home for a quick tea and bed (the tea sometimes doesn't get provided - placing that piece of ham between the bread can be a taxing business). That isn't just the low-income parents I'm referring to.

 

Schools shouldn't be free childcare services.

 

From what I remember it isn't free?

 

Again, you are talking about a minority. I think the people you're referring to are more career people who had kids just because it was part of their "plan" not that they really wanted them.

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Sounds like you owe a lot of your success to a good education there! What a shame you are so quick to lambast the profession that helped you on your journey.

 

I absolutely loved school, and had some fantastic teachers that made learning fun but I honestly cannot recall never having one day away from school due to teacher's striking, or hearing about any of our teacher's complaining about their jobs/holidays/pay etc.

 

Obviously my university degrees were paid for (by my parents) so that's different, but again the majority of my lecturer's were fantastic and helped make university such a great experience.

 

As I said in a previous post I wouldn't be a teacher for a gold pig - but my point right from the beginning isn't that teacher's don't do a good job, or that some of them don't have a constant battle with both students and their parents, it is simply that they don't have the hardest/least paid/worst holidays in any profession yet it is something as a society we are constantly hearing about.

Edited by ll49

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I absolutely loved school, and had some fantastic teachers that made learning fun but I honestly cannot recall never having one day away from school due to teacher's striking, or hearing about any of our teacher's complaining about their jobs/holidays/pay etc.

 

Obviously my university degrees were paid for so that's different, but again the majority of my lecturer's were fantastic and helped make university such a great experience.

 

As I said in a previous post I wouldn't be a teacher for a gold pig - but my point right from the beginning isn't that teacher's don't do a good job, or that some of them don't have a constant battle with both students and their parents, it is simply that they don't have the hardest/least paid/worst holidays in any profession yet it is something as a society we are constantly hearing about.

 

Odd as it may sound and slightly off subject, I can't remember much about school at all, other than where I went and who my friends were! Of the subject I now teach, I couldn't name one teacher, I just always liked it!

 

Teachers didn't strike as much in the past as they were not so harshly regulated and measured, yet still managed to provide excellent educations. The content they were delivering would not become obsolete without notice or pay conditions changed with no warning. Despise all that happening within the four years I have done the job, I would never 'complain' to pupils, it's not professional, so that aspect is not much different.

 

I would like to add I can totally see where you are coming from with the last point. I entered the profession after 5 years in banking (not a math teacher though!) and 2 before that in retail. I find some teachers who have only ever been teachers can be blinkered as to the rest of the working world. Whereas I hope I can see the pros and cons of the profession.

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Odd as it may sound and slightly off subject, I can't remember much about school at all, other than where I went and who my friends were! Of the subject I now teach, I couldn't name one teacher, I just always liked it!

 

Teachers didn't strike as much in the past as they were not so harshly regulated and measured, yet still managed to provide excellent educations. The content they were delivering would not become obsolete without notice or pay conditions changed with no warning. Despise all that happening within the four years I have done the job, I would never 'complain' to pupils, it's not professional, so that aspect is not much different.

 

I would like to add I can totally see where you are coming from with the last point. I entered the profession after 5 years in banking (not a math teacher though!) and 2 before that in retail. I find some teachers who have only ever been teachers can be blinkered as to the rest of the working world. Whereas I hope I can see the pros and cons of the profession.

 

I can still remember school as if it was yesterday, from what the classrooms looked like, can remember how it felt walking down the corridors when it felt like school was the whole world (which I guess it was back then), I loved our school dinners, and school trips were brilliant! I'm so grateful I've got such good memories of school because I know it's the worst time of some people's lives due to cruel bullies etc.

 

I also think it's great how honest you are, and maybe you've hit the nail on the head about how you can see this from both sides due to having experience in different professions.

 

I hope you will be remembered by the children you teach now when they are adults as fondly as I remember so many of my teachers.

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