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A rhetorical Question

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Are there any English teachers out there? And if so can you answer me a couple of ( for you ) simple questions?

Is it usual to put a ? At the end of a rhetorical question?

And like I did at the beginning ask two questions in on sentence use one or two?

And I'll get it over with before anybody else says it. Is this a rhetorical question?

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Would it be usual to put the question mark?

Yes of course it would!

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Are there any English teachers out there? And if so can you answer me a couple of ( for you ) simple questions?

Is it usual to put a ? At the end of a rhetorical question?

And like I did at the beginning ask two questions in on sentence use one or two?

And I'll get it over with before anybody else says it. Is this a rhetorical question?

 

What bothers me more is when someone TELLS you something and then puts a question mark on the end!

 

"I have a blue car on my driveway?"

 

"I've seen them for sale in Asda?"

 

"You can always try a different route?"

 

...it just makes people sound like they're really confused about what they're saying :help:

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Would it be usual to put the question mark?

Yes of course it would!

Why's that then? It says in my little Oxford dictionary that "rhetoric is the art of speaking or writing effectively" so aren't you just making a statement?

And what about my second question?

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Are there any English teachers out there?

Plenty, I am not one of them.

And if so can you answer me a couple of ( for you ) simple questions?

Yes I can! Although I'm quite good at grammar, I'm still not a teacher.

 

Is it usual to put a ? At the end of a rhetorical question?

 

Yes, it is, but it should have been a lower case 'a' at the beginning of the word 'at'.

And like I did at the beginning ask two questions in on sentence use one or two?

Two sentences require two question marks.

And I'll get it over with before anybody else says it. Is this a rhetorical question?

No.

 

Why's that then? It says in my little Oxford dictionary that "rhetoric is the art of speaking or writing effectively" so aren't you just making a statement?

And what about my second question?

No, it is still a rhetorical question. It is in your rhetoric, but it still asks a question, which you are likely to go on to answer.

 

I believe I have answered all your questions now. Have I not? :hihi:

Edited by RonJeremy

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Plenty, I am not one of them.

 

Yes I can! Although I'm quite good at grammar, I'm still not a teacher.

 

 

Yes, it is, but it should have been a lower case 'a' at the beginning of the word 'at'.

 

Two sentences require two question marks.

 

No.

 

 

No it is still a rhetorical question. It is in your rhetoric, but it still asks a question, which you are likely to go on to answer.

 

I believe I have answered all you questions now. Have I not? :hihi:

Yes you have. Also the capital A came up because it came after a ? And I'm stilt haven't mustered thus predictive stiff. Yes I know I did it again.

I also missed an e in one, but then again nobody's prefect.

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What bothers me more is when someone TELLS you something and then puts a question mark on the end!

 

"I have a blue car on my driveway?"

 

"I've seen them for sale in Asda?"

 

"You can always try a different route?"

 

...it just makes people sound like they're really confused about what they're saying :help:

 

I think you'll find you're referring to Australians there.

They always put an inflection on the last word to make it sound like a question, as in these examples:

 

'Help! … Skippy's been stung by a rattlesnake?'

 

'By dingum, cobbler … that Foster's is warm!?'

 

'Bad news boys ... Skippy's been jumping too high again and has now been decapitated by the park ranger's chopper?'

 

'Oi! … hands off cobbler! That's my Vegemite!?'

 

See what I mean?

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What bothers me more is when someone TELLS you something and then puts a question mark on the end!

 

"I have a blue car on my driveway?"

 

"I've seen them for sale in Asda?"

 

"You can always try a different route?"

 

...it just makes people sound like they're really confused about what they're saying :help:

 

My 11yr daughter does this!

 

She ends every sentence with what sounds like a question and her voice raises up slightly and almost American towards the very end...

 

I'm not sure she belongs to me actually.

 

---------- Post added 23-09-2015 at 15:55 ----------

 

Are there any English teachers out there? And if so can you answer me a couple of ( for you ) simple questions?

Is it usual to put a ? At the end of a rhetorical question?

And like I did at the beginning ask two questions in on sentence use one or two?

And I'll get it over with before anybody else says it. Is this a rhetorical question?

 

No........

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Have you never heard of Google?

 

(That's a type of rhetorical question that requires a question mark at the end.)

Do Rhetorical Questions Need a Question Mark?

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Have you never heard of Google?

 

(That's a type of rhetorical question that requires a question mark at the end.)

Do Rhetorical Questions Need a Question Mark?

 

Don't you know that post could be construed as being a little rude? :hihi:

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My 11yr daughter does this!

 

you have an 11 year old kid ?

 

You're a lot older than I expected !

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What bothers me more is when someone TELLS you something and then puts a question mark on the end!

 

"I have a blue car on my driveway?"

 

"I've seen them for sale in Asda?"

 

"You can always try a different route?"

 

...it just makes people sound like they're really confused about what they're saying :help:

 

 

This annoys me too. It's called "up-speak" apparently and started off with teenagers trying to imitate Americans but has become much more widespread - I get to endure it from middle aged corporate bores. To me it doesn't sound like they're confused, it just sounds like they're sheep with zero individuality and nothing worthwhile to say anyway.

 

---------- Post added 23-09-2015 at 21:59 ----------

 

you have an 11 year old kid ?

 

You're a lot older than I expected !

 

 

An "82" at the end of a username would suggest age 33 to me.

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