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Save the 12 Trees on Rustlings Road - Please sign Petition

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Were you dragged up?

I've never known such rudeness.

If you can't be civil I'll pop you on ignore.

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Of course there's disagreement. You can't deny some of those trees are stopping the contractors carrying out their jobs properly for the benefit of all Sheffielders though.

This is short sighted selfishness. Nothing will convince me otherwise.

 

*For the record those who know me personally regard me a total tree hugger, but you cannot have an healthy environment without tree .management as you'll know given your experience. ;)

 

Re my bold.

 

There is your problem encapsulated in that sorry statement. You have already made your mind up and won't allow yourself to be confused by the facts!

 

As far as "short sightedness" goes it seems to me that you are trying to teach best what you most need to learn!

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Re my bold.

 

There is your problem encapsulated in that sorry statement. You have already made your mind up and won't allow yourself to be confused by the facts!

 

You're confusing the word fact with selfishness.

 

Would you have me believe the world is flat when all evidence says it isnt?

Yeah you probably would. :roll:

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The facts of the matter here are that there is no strategy, no plans, no design, no protocols to ensure current best practice is specified, implemented, monitored, enforced, reviewed & revised. It really IS a cowboy approach to tree management – you could get away with it in the 80s & 90s, but there really is no excuse now that we are all online & info is readily available & communication so easy. The FOIs that SORT did get responses to exposed a lot of stuff that SCC have been hiding. You can understand why officials have avoided any meaningful communication – because for them, all their responses would reflect badly on them. Each response received indicates the opposite of everything they have claimed they did & do.

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Please can someone help and advise me.

 

We have a mature Ash tree on the pavement directly outside my house which has received the' death warrant' notice on it I also had a letter pushed through stating it's removal on 21 September.

 

This tree is lifting the pavement and has caused damage to our boundary wall BUT is the only tree near me for birds (including a woodpecker) and I am upset it's being removed. I think my main concern is land 'heave' the opposite to subsidence as the tree is huge and I am sure it's removal will cause problems.

 

Why oh why couldn't they just manage these trees, saplings are not and never will be (not in my lifetime) a replacement. Why can't these trees be pollarded?

 

I phoned Amey and am promised a call back from an arbourist next week

 

What would you do? What can I do, no one else is bothered as it doesn't affect them directly.

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You're confusing the word fact with selfishness.

 

Would you have me believe the world is flat when all evidence says it isnt?

Yeah you probably would. :roll:

 

Re my bold.

 

Really?

Would you care to clarify exactly how you came to that conclusion.

 

The evidence seems to be pointing very much in the direction of the fact that the only flat item here is the chasm in your understanding of street trees and their maintenance under a positive tree strategy.

 

If you've anything positive to discuss I'm more than happy to accommodate you. If it's just more rolling eyes and nonsense then don't bother!

 

---------- Post added 22-08-2015 at 15:50 ----------

 

Please can someone help and advise me.

 

We have a mature Ash tree on the pavement directly outside my house which has received the' death warrant' notice on it I also had a letter pushed through stating it's removal on 21 September.

 

This tree is lifting the pavement and has caused damage to our boundary wall BUT is the only tree near me for birds (including a woodpecker) and I am upset it's being removed. I think my main concern is land 'heave' the opposite to subsidence as the tree is huge and I am sure it's removal will cause problems.

 

Why oh why couldn't they just manage these trees, saplings are not and never will be (not in my lifetime) a replacement. Why can't these trees be pollarded?

 

I phoned Amey and am promised a call back from an arbourist next week

 

What would you do? What can I do, no one else is bothered as it doesn't affect them directly.

 

There is a meeting at the Heeley Institute this coming Tuesday (25th) at 7pm.

If you can make it to this meeting you will find all the advice you need and if the tree is not diseased or the problem cannot be solved by positive alternative engineering solutions you will also find help of a more practical nature.

If you can't make it please feel free to PM me and I'll come and see for myself.

 

PS. The meeting is for all the different tree groups across the city to come together with the aim of forming a city wide group to unite under one banner to fight against the current council/Amey strategy.

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Re my bold.

 

Really?

Would you care to clarify exactly how you came to that conclusion.

 

The evidence seems to be pointing very much in the direction of the fact that the only flat item here is the chasm in your understanding of street trees and their maintenance under a positive tree strategy.

 

If you've anything positive to discuss I'm more than happy to accommodate you. If it's just more rolling eyes and nonsense then don't bother!

 

---------- Post added 22-08-2015 at 15:50 ----------

 

 

There is a meeting at the Heeley Institute this coming Tuesday (25th) at 7pm.

If you can make it to this meeting you will find all the advice you need and if the tree is not diseased or the problem cannot be solved by positive alternative engineering solutions you will also find help of a more practical nature.

If you can't make it please feel free to PM me and I'll come and see for myself.

 

PS. The meeting is for all the different tree groups across the city to come together with the aim of forming a city wide group to unite under one banner to fight against the current council/Amey strategy.

 

Thanks I will come along!

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How other councils manage their street trees:

 

"Brisbane's street trees are estimated to be returning $1.67m each year in air quality, rainfall interception, carbon storage and sequestration benefits, and $29.7m in residential property value benefits (measured using i-Tree ECO V5 in 2011)"

 

http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/environment-waste/natural-environment/plants-trees-gardens/brisbanes-trees/street-trees

 

"ParksWide, through contractors, is responsible for watering new trees, generally once a week in the summer months for the first two years after planting. During prolonged hot dry periods, residents can greatly assist the establishment of the tree in front of their property by pouring a bucket of water in the black plastic watering tube once or twice a week"

 

http://www.whitehorse.vic.gov.au/Street-Tree-Planting.html

 

"After considerable community consultation, Council adopted a Street Tree Planting Strategy in June 2002, which outlined the character associated with the different areas of Whitehorse and made recommendations for future street tree selection"

 

http://www.whitehorse.vic.gov.au/Street-Tree-Planting.html

 

"Pollarding is not an acceptable technique for street tree management"

 

---------- Post added 23-08-2015 at 02:41 ----------

 

So the modern approach is:

1. To use software like i-Tree to evaluate the monetary worth of the ecosystem goods and services that street trees provide. SCC have yet to implement this.

2. To involve the community in decision making. SCC have yet to implement this .

3. Watering saplings for 2 years after planting. Amey are not currently doing this - hence the 25% death rate for saplings.

4. Not pollarding street trees. This appears to be more of an issue for Rotherham City Council currently. Am hoping that their bad habits do not migrate!

Edited by Mindfulness

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How other councils manage their street trees:

 

"Brisbane's street trees are estimated to be returning $1.67m each year in air quality, rainfall interception, carbon storage and sequestration benefits, and $29.7m in residential property value benefits (measured using i-Tree ECO V5 in 2011)"

 

http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/environment-waste/natural-environment/plants-trees-gardens/brisbanes-trees/street-trees

 

"ParksWide, through contractors, is responsible for watering new trees, generally once a week in the summer months for the first two years after planting. During prolonged hot dry periods, residents can greatly assist the establishment of the tree in front of their property by pouring a bucket of water in the black plastic watering tube once or twice a week"

 

http://www.whitehorse.vic.gov.au/Street-Tree-Planting.html

 

"After considerable community consultation, Council adopted a Street Tree Planting Strategy in June 2002, which outlined the character associated with the different areas of Whitehorse and made recommendations for future street tree selection"

 

http://www.whitehorse.vic.gov.au/Street-Tree-Planting.html

 

"Pollarding is not an acceptable technique for street tree management"

 

---------- Post added 23-08-2015 at 02:41 ----------

 

So the modern approach is:

1. To use software like i-Tree to evaluate the monetary worth of the ecosystem goods and services that street trees provide. SCC have yet to implement this.

2. To involve the community in decision making. SCC have yet to implement this .

3. Watering saplings for 2 years after planting. Amey are not currently doing this - hence the 25% death rate for saplings.

4. Not pollarding street trees. This appears to be more of an issue for Rotherham City Council currently. Am hoping that their bad habits do not migrate!

 

What is the long term effect of pollarding? What is the impact on those trees that have already been pol larded?

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