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The Plough-sandygate

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Id be happy to see the land put to better use.

Its been proved many times that its never going to be a successful pub so lets leave that one there.

What are the alternatives ?

Another supermarket ? I'm with the no voters on that one. its just not needed.

Housing would seem to be a good option.

Just my thoughts.

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Not sure how it can be classed as an eyesore?

 

You think an empty building surrounded by security fencing is adding to the street scene?

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You think an empty building surrounded by security fencing is adding to the street scene?

 

It’d be a bit barren if everytime a building became empty it was knocked down.

 

I think reuse would be a better option.

 

I think it could be viable as a pub if ran correctly.

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It’d be a bit barren if everytime a building became empty it was knocked down.

 

I think reuse would be a better option.

 

I think it could be viable as a pub if ran correctly.

 

I think if it could be run as a viable pub business it wouldn’t be in the situation it is now.

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I think if it could be run as a viable pub business it wouldn’t be in the situation it is now.

 

I’m not sure - it was brewery tied before and those pubs are always limited.

 

As a freehold selling the right food and drink there’s no reason it couldn’t do well.

 

The area isn’t teeming with good pubs / restaurants is it.

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I think if it could be run as a viable pub business it wouldn’t be in the situation it is now.

 

I agree its been empty or a failing pub for years now,unless someone has immediate planes to invest in it then best to put the land to an alternative use (legally of course)

 

It looks bad with all that fencing round it.

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So, I read up all the planning permission documents with the application details, the against and for comments from neighbours and finally the decision notice.

 

If it was decided to not grant permission, can it still be demolished by new owners (would they need no permission for demolishing itself) or am I missing something in the process of planning etc?

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So, I read up all the planning permission documents with the application details, the against and for comments from neighbours and finally the decision notice.

 

If it was decided to not grant permission, can it still be demolished by new owners (would they need no permission for demolishing itself) or am I missing something in the process of planning etc?

 

It has been listed as an asset of community value. By law it has to stay as a pub for the next 5 years (and renewable beyond that).

 

If the unscrupulous Spacepad demolish it, they will have demolished a listed building, made a mockery of the Council and planning laws, and given a big V sign to the local community.

 

The community group did all it could do legally. They raised enough money to buy and renovate it at market value. Spacepad paid more because they want to do something illegal with it - demolish it and build an enormous complex of flats.

 

---------- Post added 10-11-2017 at 09:57 ----------

 

I think if it could be run as a viable pub business it wouldn’t be in the situation it is now.

 

That's misunderstanding the nature of property management. It's very viable as a pub, but much more profitable as high rise flats.

 

The battle is community asset vs lots of money for property magnate Mark Platts (owner of SpacePad)

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It has been listed as an asset of community value. By law it has to stay as a pub for the next 5 years (and renewable beyond that).

 

If the unscrupulous Spacepad demolish it, they will have demolished a listed building, made a mockery of the Council and planning laws, and given a big V sign to the local community.

 

The community group did all it could do legally. They raised enough money to buy and renovate it at market value. Spacepad paid more because they want to do something illegal with it - demolish it and build an enormous complex of flats.

 

---------- Post added 10-11-2017 at 09:57 ----------

 

 

That's misunderstanding the nature of property management. It's very viable as a pub, but much more profitable as high rise flats.

 

The battle is community asset vs lots of money for property magnate Mark Platts (owner of SpacePad)

 

I don’t think so, it’s struggled as a pub for years with several relaunches and comebacks but all to no avail. Simple fact is not enough people went in and spent enough money.

 

Never a place to eat which these days unless a destination real ale pub is a real disadvantage.

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I don’t think so, it’s struggled as a pub for years with several relaunches and comebacks but all to no avail. Simple fact is not enough people went in and spent enough money.

 

Never a place to eat which these days unless a destination real ale pub is a real disadvantage.

 

It's never been a free house though (only tied), and that's what you need it to be to succeed in upmarket areas.

 

It couldn't possibly have been any good while owned by a cheap 'n' cheerful pubco like Enterprise

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It's never been a free house though (only tied), and that's what you need it to be to succeed in upmarket areas.

 

It couldn't possibly have been any good while owned by a cheap 'n' cheerful pubco like Enterprise

 

Isn’t the sportsman at crosspool an ember inn? Not sure about florentine, Ranmoor, rising sun etc but think more to it than tied or freehouse.

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It's never been a free house though (only tied), and that's what you need it to be to succeed in upmarket areas.

 

It couldn't possibly have been any good while owned by a cheap 'n' cheerful pubco like Enterprise

 

When Mark and Anna had the Plough, a decade ago, it was busy most nights, and they did a ton of food (Mark was a chef), they had Daryl, the Canadian chef (great guitar player!) and they had a load of bar staff as they needed at least three serving most nights.

 

When they finally left The Plough, the reason was (surprise, surprise) Enterprise. I had a beer with Mark last year when I saw him at the Rising Sun beer festival and he said The Plough would have been a gold mine if not for Enterprise.

 

They would come in and look at his books, see his takings go up and say "well you seem to be doing great at the minute Mark, we need to increase your rent", or when he did well with certain beers it was "Looks like the beer is flying out at the minute Mark, we need to increase your barrel prices!".

 

It seems like the only industry where you get penalised for being successful, in just about every other industry, you get discounts for ordering more products, you don't pay more.

 

Enterprise put 100% mark up on beers, so any beers that any landlord could buy, say, for £50 from Kelham Island directly, they have to buy for £100 from Enterprise (or one of their subsidiaries).

 

---------- Post added 14-11-2017 at 09:57 ----------

 

Isn’t the sportsman at crosspool an ember inn? Not sure about florentine, Ranmoor, rising sun etc but think more to it than tied or freehouse.

 

Rising Sun is owned by Abbeydale Brewery, or was. Sportsman and Crosspool Tavern are Mitchell and Butlers (under two different pub brands). Not sure about Florentine. Ranmoor Inn and Bulls Head were both Enterprise from memory.

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