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Transferring skills into university qualifications.

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Just wondering, about the converting/ transferring of skills or qualifications etc into credits toward a degree/ higher qualification.

 

For example, I co-authored two papers that were published, and that I had the privilege to have presented to the society of ergonomists, at their Cambridge conference a few years ago.

 

Would that get me any credits toward a degree, does anyone know, and if so, what sort of level it would count at?

 

Thanks in advance.

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Hi PT, unlike popular belief (this could be an assumption of mine) there are plenty of options outside of academic qualifications to enter into a Masters degree program, or even a PhD program with the right background.

 

If you are interested in pursuing this I advice the following: Assuming you are keen on carrying on in the field that you presented papers in, contact academics in that particular special field. Ergonomics is a good start, matching it with your particular interests is key though. Approach them and see what they have to say.

 

A few things: Lecturers (of any grade, so upto professors) are overwhelmed by e-mail, even as a guest-lecturer I have to cope with at least 20-30 mails per day, if you are genuinely interested, pick up the phone, or even better, try and see them in person. Many universities/courses offer the opportunity for external people to attend lectures for example, this could be a good way to see A) whether you feel you can cope with the level of instruction and B) whether you think you will get on with the lecturer.

 

Once you have a personal contact you may find that there are routes to funding available, but do NOT expect to be funded, it is a very tough market out there and you only stand a chance if you are backed by an academic with the right connections/prowess.

 

Edit: PS - this is not generalisable to just anybody, you will need to be able to demonstrate some academic prowess and publishing academically is a great way to do so.

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When you apply to go onto a degree course you can fill in a section of previous work / academic history. They then look into it, possibly give you a brief interview.

 

My work history knocked two subjects off my degree and automatically gave me the credits.

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Just wondering, about the converting/ transferring of skills or qualifications etc into credits toward a degree/ higher qualification.

 

For example, I co-authored two papers that were published, and that I had the privilege to have presented to the society of ergonomists, at their Cambridge conference a few years ago.

 

Would that get me any credits toward a degree, does anyone know, and if so, what sort of level it would count at?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

The Australian immigration rules state 5 years experience is the equivalent to a degree in the subject.

 

Hope this helps.

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When you apply to go onto a degree course you can fill in a section of previous work / academic history. They then look into it, possibly give you a brief interview.

 

My work history knocked two subjects off my degree and automatically gave me the credits.

Same here, although going way back. My entrepreneurial background got me straight onto Yr2 and skipped the 3rd placement year for my 'sandwich' Business degree.

The Australian immigration rules state 5 years experience is the equivalent to a degree in the subject.
These sorts of equivalence can vary quite widely depending on the qualification level (pre- or post-grad), subject-matter ('soft' or technical/scientific) and context (qualification or immigration). So much, I expect, as to be invariably case-specific in terms of assessment and outcome.

 

E.g. the Regulation on the European qualifying examination for professional representatives before the European Patent Office and its Implementing provisions state that you can apply to sit the European qualifying examination after 3 years of practice if your have a technical degree (at the time of starting practice), but only after 10 years if without (Rule 14). Under that rule, you're therefore considered to have acquired equivalent knowledge to a technical/scientific graduate after 7 years on the job.

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If you have the dosh and experience unis will let anyone in.

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These sorts of equivalence can vary quite widely depending on the qualification level (pre- or post-grad), subject-matter ('soft' or technical/scientific) and context (qualification or immigration). So much, I expect, as to be invariably case-specific in terms of assessment and outcome.

 

E.g. the Regulation on the European qualifying examination for professional representatives before the European Patent Office and its Implementing provisions state that you can apply to sit the European qualifying examination after 3 years of practice if your have a technical degree (at the time of starting practice), but only after 10 years if without (Rule 14). Under that rule, you're therefore considered to have acquired equivalent knowledge to a technical/scientific graduate after 7 years on the job.

 

L00b, you sound like you know way more and I on the subject :) All I know is the 5 year equation is how the Australian immigration points system works.

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Same here, although going way back. My entrepreneurial background got me straight onto Yr2 and skipped the 3rd placement year for my 'sandwich' Business degree.

 

Yeah, life / work experience often allows mature students to skip the work placement. It knocked off a year off my course too.

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with a masters, if you lack the 2.1 degree but have plenty of experience it counts for a lot.

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I think much is to to with the length of time that has elapsed since your achievement.

I qualified as an SRN in 1981 and have 34 years of hands on nursing - now at a senior level - but this is worth diddlysquat towards any academic award.:(

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