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'Loudest' in-ear phones?


Electerrific

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I was told that AKG make the 'loudest' (highest decibel) in-ear phones, yet Sennheiser and Altec Lansing Muzx also seem to be of similar quality?

 

All I want is really good quality response and as 'loud' as possible, to negate the legal limited volume that UK walkmans seem to set?

 

Thanks

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You want to deafen yourself?

 

I've got some IEMs and if I turned them up full they would physically cause me pain...and my hearing isn't the best.

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No, the db rating on headphones/earphones is the maximum volume of what they can reproduce without distortion and/or damage to the driver units themselves. Most earphones are about 108db to 120db. You'll still be volume restricted by whatever your input source is if you've purchased a portable audio device since the UK legislation was changed (can't remember exactly what/when it came in) The only way to get around that is with a separate headphones pre-amp but then you'll have extra boxes to walk around with

 

What you also want to look at is the frequency response (measured in hz) human hearing is supposed to be 20hz to 20khz but the higher frequencies (20khz) get lost as we get older. You want to have something as neutral as possible depending on what you're listening to and your environment. You can always EQ the input externally to suit your own tastes depending on the quality of the input device.

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You don't especially need a decent pair of in ear headphones to be loud either; if they fit properly they'll block out so much external noise, you don't need massive volume in order to hear the music without anything from outside creeping in.

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I was told that AKG make the 'loudest' (highest decibel) in-ear phones, yet Sennheiser and Altec Lansing Muzx also seem to be of similar quality?

 

All I want is really good quality response and as 'loud' as possible, to negate the legal limited volume that UK walkmans seem to set?

 

Thanks

 

Just use the earphones and the output level recommended by the manufacturer of your Walkman unless you want to lose your hearing in later life.

 

Take it from someone who knows and who wouldn't take any notice of their parents - through listening and playing music at high volume levels when I was a teenager, I now have no hearing in my right ear, and only 23% hearing in my left......no hearing aids can compensate for my deafness, the frustration in not being able to hear vocals at rock concerts, guitar lead breaks, understand what's going on when watching TV unless there is subtitles, can't hear my car engine and great difficulty in trying to understand what people are saying to me.

 

There is an old saying ' You don't appreciate what you got until its gone ' be sensible look after your hearing !

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Just use the earphones and the output level recommended by the manufacturer of your Walkman unless you want to lose your hearing in later life.

 

Take it from someone who knows and who wouldn't take any notice of their parents - through listening and playing music at high volume levels when I was a teenager, I now have no hearing in my right ear, and only 23% hearing in my left......no hearing aids can compensate for my deafness, the frustration in not being able to hear vocals at rock concerts, guitar lead breaks, understand what's going on when watching TV unless there is subtitles, can't hear my car engine and great difficulty in trying to understand what people are saying to me.

 

There is an old saying ' You don't appreciate what you got until its gone ' be sensible look after your hearing !

 

Rock Guitarist Ted Nugent's moto used to be "if its too loud you are too old" is also now profoundly deaf.Hearing aids are not very rock n roll.

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Rock Guitarist Ted Nugent's moto used to be "if its too loud you are too old" is also now profoundly deaf.Hearing aids are not very rock n roll.

 

And my dad, who was brought up in a pub and was able to play the juke box as loud as he liked when the pub was shut would agree here. He played Jerry Lee Lewis loudly enough to damage both of his ear drums and now can't hear pretty much anything clearly without his hearing aids.

 

My OH, who has been to thousands of gigs and played guitar in lots of bands, is heading the same way too but won't admit it ;)

 

Please Electerrific, respect the reasons why the limits are there and listen clearly and loudly- but not THAT loudly.

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