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Water shots in or near Sheffield

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Sorry to jump in on this thread, but what grade ND filter would be needed to take really slow shots, i put my polarisor on and it enabled me to get slowish shots, but what is ideal?

 

(sorry if the following is teaching you to suck eggs!)

 

it depends on what the conditions are like really. see if you can do other things like drop your iso really low (like 100) and try and get to something like f22 or something similar. both of these will cause the shutter speed to be increased.

 

Depending on where you are and what you are after (and with the polariser) it may be enough. I shot a lot of the slow water ones in Endcliffe park with 2" shutter speed - all without a ND filter. There, the trees and houses helped block out a lot of the light - I went late afternoon/early evening.

 

Not sure if any of this would help you?

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(sorry if the following is teaching you to suck eggs!)

 

it depends on what the conditions are like really. see if you can do other things like drop your iso really low (like 100) and try and get to something like f22 or something similar. both of these will cause the shutter speed to be increased.

 

Depending on where you are and what you are after (and with the polariser) it may be enough. I shot a lot of the slow water ones in Endcliffe park with 2" shutter speed - all without a ND filter. There, the trees and houses helped block out a lot of the light - I went late afternoon/early evening.

 

Not sure if any of this would help you?

Not at all mate, i did all those and was in a shady spot so got it down to a couple of seconds, i am wanting to take seascapes in June, so gonna quite sunny and open, would i need an 8. or higher?

sorry once again op

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Ahh, ok :-)

 

Def 8 would be good. Might be worth going to 10 depending on how much you want to smooth things out. There is probably a more exact science to it, but I just take the filter set and see what works :-)

 

Is it a set you have or individual filters?

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Ahh, ok :-)

 

Def 8 would be good. Might be worth going to 10 depending on how much you want to smooth things out. There is probably a more exact science to it, but I just take the filter set and see what works :-)

 

Is it a set you have or individual filters?

No, Having just bought the camera and a tripod, I only have the one filter at the moment (polarizer) so i am just looking to get what i need at the moment.

Thanks for your help

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No, Having just bought the camera and a tripod, I only have the one filter at the moment (polarizer) so i am just looking to get what i need at the moment.

Thanks for your help

 

OK, cool :)

 

so something like this would be good -

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cokin-H250A-ND-Grad-Kit/dp/B000A40M22/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1426487030&sr=8-2&keywords=cokin+filter+set

 

You need to buy an adaptor ring for your size lens as well, but these are great. There are more expensive makes out there (like Lee), but I got the Cokin set and it is great.

 

It comes with 3 filters and you basically just slide them in so can mix and match to the level you want :)

 

Also, you can turn the filter to the angle you need - what I mean (and probably not explaining very well) is the light may be coming in from a corner or the side rather than the top and you can turn the kit to compensate.

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OK, cool :)

 

so something like this would be good -

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cokin-H250A-ND-Grad-Kit/dp/B000A40M22/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1426487030&sr=8-2&keywords=cokin+filter+set

 

You need to buy an adaptor ring for your size lens as well, but these are great. There are more expensive makes out there (like Lee), but I got the Cokin set and it is great.

 

It comes with 3 filters and you basically just slide them in so can mix and match to the level you want :)

 

Also, you can turn the filter to the angle you need - what I mean (and probably not explaining very well) is the light may be coming in from a corner or the side rather than the top and you can turn the kit to compensate.

Thanks, i will look into that

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For a slow shot on normal film you could knock up a pinhole lens from a spare body cap. You can make quite an accurate one for your focal length with aluminium from a drinks can and a graded sewing needle, if it's a 35mm format you're looking at, ummm, f200-ish for a sharp hole, that'll slow you down.

 

If you're digital, can't you just slow your iso right down? If not, tried shooting paper? Generally rates as 3-12 iso....

 

(edit - sorry, read an earlier post re dropping your ISO, don't really know digital so not sure how low you can go, 100 is fairly quick for me! I know the pinhole thing works for dig though, my GF has one of those body cap pinholes...)

Edited by Spacebadger

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(edit - sorry, read an earlier post re dropping your ISO, don't really know digital so not sure how low you can go, 100 is fairly quick for me! I know the pinhole thing works for dig though, my GF has one of those body cap pinholes...)

 

hi Spacebadger, so on most DSLR's you are looking at a range of 100/200 up to the '000's (the new Nikon D7200 is supposed to be able to go to 102,400 but that is reserved for b&w images only!)

 

iso 100 does make a big difference normally if light is average etc. no idea how it relates to film as not really shot film - sorry :(

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hi Spacebadger, so on most DSLR's you are looking at a range of 100/200 up to the '000's (the new Nikon D7200 is supposed to be able to go to 102,400 but that is reserved for b&w images only!)

 

iso 100 does make a big difference normally if light is average etc. no idea how it relates to film as not really shot film - sorry :(

 

Ah, ok. I've a little point and shoot dig that I use as a light meter, that only goes down to 100 iso too but I thought bigger cams would have more of a range.

 

Mermaids pool on Kinder a few weeks back, shot at 3 iso on Ilford MG IV paper, 1954 Graflex Optar 90mm lens on homebrew body:

 

16383098940_7a27bccf22_z.jpgMermaids Pool by BoogiePix, on Flickr

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