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Are all tooth pastes the same?

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Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS) is in MOST tooth paste, because it is a cheap cleaning agent. It is in floor cleaners etc. Check the list of ingredients on the tube. SLS also causes mouth ulcers.:o

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Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS) is in MOST tooth paste, because it is a cheap cleaning agent. It is in floor cleaners etc. Check the list of ingredients on the tube. SLS also causes mouth ulcers.:o

 

Again, there's not much evidence to support that. In fact the largest blinded trials of SLS free vs SLS containing toothpastes show there is absolutely no difference. On the other hand some evidence suggests that low levels of SLS might have a beneficial effect on the oral mucosa.

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10218040

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22435470

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17576237

 

None of the ulcer parameters measured was significantly affected by the use of the SLS-free dentifrice as compared with the SLS dentifrice.

 

The number of ulcers and episodes did not differ significantly between SLS-A, SLS-B, and SLS-free.

 

SLS have dual effects on reconstituted human OM; although occasional cell death within the epithelium was also observed, the increased epithelial thickness, proliferation and E-cadherin expression induced at lower concentrations might be associated with a protective mucosal response

 

---------- Post added 05-11-2014 at 17:46 ----------

 

fluoride has other negative affects on your body, such as accelerating the calcification of your pineal gland...

 

Fluoride is also added to our water supply, and other things, so you really don't need a toothpaste with it in, we already consume way too much imho!

 

Not in Sheffield it's not:

http://www.bfsweb.org/onemillion/09%20One%20in%20a%20Million%20-%20The%20Extent%20of%20Fluoridation.pdf

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"although occasional cell death within the epithelium was also observed"

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"although occasional cell death within the epithelium was also observed"

 

Yes occasionally cells die. In fact 50-70 billion cells in an adult human will die each day. Not much of a problem.

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I think that if you're in Sheffield and you therefore don't have fluoridated water, it's actually quite important that you use either a mouthwash or a toothpaste that do contain fluoride, since there is plenty of evidence that fluoride does have a beneficial effect in terms of remineralising enamel. I can understand people not wishing to overdose themselves when they're in an area with fluoride in the water, but if you're in an area without then choosing to use a toothpaste that also doesn't have it in doesn't make much sense to me.

 

As for getting your teeth sorted out, yes, there is a similar base in most toothpastes, but that's just for your average toothpastes. If you have sensitive teeth then you'll know that a toothpaste for sensitive teeth does make a difference to the sensitivity (and different compounds in different brands are better for different people) and there are deep cleaning pastes which contain the crystals that are used when having a scale and polish too.

 

As pretty much any dentist will tell you though, the very best thing that you can do is to clean your teeth effectively (including flossing) regularly and often (before food, rather than after, if you can) with a gentle brush and some standard toothpaste. No amount of flashy paste and electric toothbrushes will help if you don't use them often enough or effectively enough.

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Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS) is in MOST tooth paste, because it is a cheap cleaning agent. It is in floor cleaners etc. Check the list of ingredients on the tube. SLS also causes mouth ulcers.:o

 

Glad you said that,because not a lot of people know the fact that mouthwash was firstly designed as a floor cleaner,but never hit off.They then,with no changes in the ingredients, started selling it as a mouthwash,FACT.

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clean your teeth effectively (including flossing) regularly and often (before food, rather than after, if you can) with a gentle brush and some standard toothpaste.

 

Why before eating, if its the food that is causing the plaque?

 

---------- Post added 05-11-2014 at 21:08 ----------

 

Glad you said that,because not a lot of people know the fact that mouthwash was firstly designed as a floor cleaner,but never hit off.They then,with no changes in the ingredients, started selling it as a mouthwash,FACT.

 

Is it just as good, or better, to use diluted disinfectant/dettol?

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Why before eating, if its the food that is causing the plaque?

 

 

There's a cycle of events set off by eating.

 

After you eat the plaque bacteria (that's plaque, not plague, as my PhraseExpress tried to change it to!) go into a huge growth cycle, feeding on the remnants of the food left in the mouth after eating. The plaque bacteria both produce and prefer a mildly acidic environment, and saliva is mildly alkaline. The bacterial growth cycle produces plaque acids, which is what harms the teeth by eroding the enamel, and chewing sugar free gum or similar produces more saliva, which neutralises this acid and returns the mouth to the alkaline environment which keeps everything healthy.

 

So- you CAN clean your teeth after eating to remove the bacteria, but the problem with this is that because of the plaque acids this is the time at which your enamel is at its most delicate and when brushing too hard could do the most damage to it. The aim of cleaning the teeth is to look after them, not to damage them further.

 

If you clean your teeth BEFORE you eat then you remove the background levels of plaque in the mouth, so reducing the number which can go into a growth cycle feeding on the food, and you can do it when your enamel is less fragile so you're less likely to cause abrasive damage to the enamel with your toothbrush.

 

Can you tell that I shared a house with some student dentists when I was at university? :)

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There's a cycle of events set off by eating.

 

After you eat the plaque bacteria (that's plaque, not plague, as my PhraseExpress tried to change it to!) go into a huge growth cycle, feeding on the remnants of the food left in the mouth after eating.

 

If you brush after eating you get rid of this "huge growth cycle"?

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I think that if you're in Sheffield and you therefore don't have fluoridated water, it's actually quite important that you use either a mouthwash or a toothpaste that do contain fluoride, since there is plenty of evidence that fluoride does have a beneficial effect in terms of remineralising enamel. I can understand people not wishing to overdose themselves when they're in an area with fluoride in the water, but if you're in an area without then choosing to use a toothpaste that also doesn't have it in doesn't make much sense to me.

 

As for getting your teeth sorted out, yes, there is a similar base in most toothpastes, but that's just for your average toothpastes. If you have sensitive teeth then you'll know that a toothpaste for sensitive teeth does make a difference to the sensitivity (and different compounds in different brands are better for different people) and there are deep cleaning pastes which contain the crystals that are used when having a scale and polish too.

 

As pretty much any dentist will tell you though, the very best thing that you can do is to clean your teeth effectively (including flossing) regularly and often (before food, rather than after, if you can) with a gentle brush and some standard toothpaste. No amount of flashy paste and electric toothbrushes will help if you don't use them often enough or effectively enough.

 

:huh::loopy::gag:as for the taste of your food:gag:

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If you brush after eating you get rid of this "huge growth cycle"?

 

Well, you don't get rid of it, you reduce it somewhat. And you reduce it in a way that may also do damage to your enamel. If you brush before your meal you've reduced the number of bacteria which can then go into a growth cycle and you're doing it when your enamel is not already bathed in acidic environment.

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Well, you don't get rid of it, you reduce it somewhat. And you reduce it in a way that may also do damage to your enamel. If you brush before your meal you've reduced the number of bacteria which can then go into a growth cycle and you're doing it when your enamel is not already bathed in acidic environment.

 

From a scientific point of view I am convinced that brushing for at least two minutes before breakfast is best and I advise all my patients to brush before breakfast with a fluoride toothpaste but I also tell all my patients to consider washing (brushing?) their mouth with water only after breakfast to get rid of the food debris left behind so that it does not stay on the teeth all day.

 

http://www.mertondental.co.uk/blog/when-should-i-brush-my-teeth-before-or-after-breakfast/

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