Jump to content


Re-Launch of Neighbourhood Watch in Sheffield

Recommended Posts

It would be nice to know who is chairing this meeting and what officials that will be their?

 

Hello and thank you for asking about the meeting on Wednesday.

 

The meeting is being run by the Sheffield Neighbourhood Watch.

 

Most of the committee/area co-ordinators and chair will be present

 

There will also be guest speaker from the University on the subject of social media.

 

Additionally there will be number of representatives from South Yorkshire Police

 

These will including two chief inspectors, jointly responsible for the whole of Sheffield.

 

The topics to be discussed are:

 

how neighbourhood watch works,

neighbourhood watch in the 21st-century,

social media, changes in legislation,

the legal powers of the citizen,

 

this will be followed by a brief Q&A, and it is hoped that this meeting will be the first of many.

 

Thank you

 

---------- Post added 25-08-2014 at 20:53 ----------

 

Very silly of you to present yourself as something special and then stick your head in the noose.

 

Contributory negligence does not apply as you suggest ... as it does not apply to rape.

 

Do what you are good at and stop trying to be all things to all people.

 

We are informed that it is a civil tort of negligence, and that negligence can be contributory. We are also told that it could reasonably apply in a dispute over insurance liability or claims.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello and thank you for asking about the meeting on Wednesday.

 

The meeting is being run by the Sheffield Neighbourhood Watch.

 

Most of the committee/area co-ordinators and chair will be present

 

There will also be guest speaker from the University on the subject of social media.

 

Additionally there will be number of representatives from South Yorkshire Police

 

These will including two chief inspectors, jointly responsible for the whole of Sheffield.

 

The topics to be discussed are:

 

how neighbourhood watch works,

neighbourhood watch in the 21st-century,

social media, changes in legislation,

the legal powers of the citizen,

 

this will be followed by a brief Q&A, and it is hoped that this meeting will be the first of many.

 

Thank you

 

My Bold

 

Thank you for your reply

 

If this is a re-launch how come you have these all ready appointed?

 

the committee/area co-ordinators and chair will be present[

 

Who els do you need at the meeting and why

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NWSheffield, your user name, avatar, signature and use of the first person plural would indicate that you are speaking on behalf of Sheffield Neighbourhood Watch. However some of your comments appear to be merely personal opinions. There is also the small problem that some of your posts don't make sense. An earlier poster asked for a translation and you confessed you'd forgotten what you meant so couldn't help him.

 

Thank you for your query, the context of these replies is predominantly those of Neighbourhood Watch as an organisation as this is their account.

 

Any reference to the individual opinion, other than recounted experiences, must be purely accidental. But thank you for your concerns and we will do our best to correct that in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Except of course the perpetrator. :)

 

We all know the kind of world we live in so anyone who doesn't lock up or move things from view has only themselves to blame. Unfortunately we live in a world where you can't afford to not take security seriously! While blame does lie with the perpetrator, you still can't go around leaving things unlocked or on view so blame does lie with the victim! Obviously you can't legislate for people actually smashing windows etc but if you leave it so someone can just waltz into your house then you can't really complain...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[/color]

 

Hi Alan

 

Thank you for bringing up the issue of the perpetrator.

 

We are aware that a considerable number of offenders when arrested and tested for being under the influence of drugs or alcohol are found to have issues in those areas.

 

From a recent conversation held with professionals at a mental health unit it became clear that some of the residents at the mental health unit had issues with both drugs and alcohol.

 

One of the members of staff related her 20 years of experience to alcohol being the most dangerous drug she had to deal with.

 

She made a statement that even heroin addicts can be brought off of heroin at home.

But alcoholics needed to be admitted to hospital.

 

When pressed on the subject she made the statement that made me realise that the perpetrator if under the influence of drink or drugs is behaving differently.

 

If we don't take drink or drugs maybe it's difficult for us to understand the effects that either drink or drugs or a combination of both can have on a perpetrator.

 

Is there motivation the drink or the drugs?

 

As a society do we consider the individual to be capable when they are in fact addicts to either drink or drugs?

 

 

Is the solution putting people who have mind altering substances in their body in prison when it may in fact be the mind altering substance that is caused the crime?

 

The term out of it I've heard used on many occasions... Could this be a real recognition that the harm that drink or drugs causes is actually just the crime.

 

So no matter who gets burgled or suffers crime they are in fact the victim and that victim is called society?

 

I think you've hit on an absolutely fantastic point Alan we need to look more at the perpetrator and we need to consider in more detail their ability to resist these influences, that so many of them have upon them, at the time they commit crime?

 

What next, sympathy for drunk drivers who kill. :roll:

 

---------- Post added 25-08-2014 at 23:12 ----------

 

We all know the kind of world we live in so anyone who doesn't lock up or move things from view has only themselves to blame. Unfortunately we live in a world where you can't afford to not take security seriously! While blame does lie with the perpetrator, you still can't go around leaving things unlocked or on view so blame does lie with the victim! Obviously you can't legislate for people actually smashing windows etc but if you leave it so someone can just waltz into your house then you can't really complain...

 

It pleases me that the police don`t share your views.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What next, sympathy for drunk drivers who kill. :roll:

 

---------- Post added 25-08-2014 at 23:12 ----------

 

 

It pleases me that the police don`t share your views.

 

I think you're missing the point. As a member of society you cannot do anything about criminals on the street. The only thing you have control over is locking things up and keeping things out of your car. So are you saying if you leave your Sat Nav in your car overnight and it gets stolen you are blameless or am I missing your point?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you're missing the point. As a member of society you cannot do anything about criminals on the street. The only thing you have control over is locking things up and keeping things out of your car. So are you saying if you leave your Sat Nav in your car overnight and it gets stolen you are blameless or am I missing your point?

 

It is you that is doing the SAYING. The key word you used about victims was ONLY themselves to blame. No one else ONLY the victims are to blame. :loopy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The criminal is to blame as well but like I say, if you don't take reasonable steps to hide things from view or lock stuff up you have yourself to blame. Also I think you'll find the police do share that view, otherwise why do they come round telling you to lock your doors and empty your car at night. Insurance companies take that view as well by voiding your insurance in certain situations. Maybe I shouldn't have used the word only but if you don't take measures by doing the simple things then it is a mistake you have made that lead to you being burgled or car broken into therefore you have to take some responsibility for not taking appropriate measures to safeguard your property.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am pleased you have seen your errors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So are you saying if you leave your Sat Nav in your car overnight and it gets stolen you are blameless

 

Of course you are blameless.

 

The scrote who nicks the sat nav is 100% to blame.

 

I really dislike victim blaming, wherever it rears its head.

 

What next? "She was asking for it"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am pleased you have seen your errors.

 

Well if anything is to be gained by this, the moral of the story is keep stuff locked up and out of view! If people intentionally leave stuff on view and don't lock doors because of hippie ideas of what we'd like the world to be like, then they can't moan when they get things stolen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well if anything is to be gained by this, the moral of the story is keep stuff locked up and out of view! If people intentionally leave stuff on view and don't lock doors because of hippie ideas of what we'd like the world to be like, then they can't moan when they get things stolen!

 

Yes they can.

 

And they should.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.