Jump to content

Anyone come from Lansdowne Rd area?

Recommended Posts

7 hours ago, sharrowyank said:

I remember Johnny Hammond  and the bakery . I lived at #88 . A few doors down was another friend , Johnny Mangles. and farther down on the other side of the street was Johnny Briggs .  We lived directly opposite  Fanny Robinson’s shop .

there was a shop on the same side as Hammonds bakery further down, called Millachips, you must have been just below that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We lived at 146 Lansdowne road,left in 1966 when a was 6. Went to Sharrow infant school. Beforere   moving to   Gleadless .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone remember Albert and May Potts who had the Sheaf on Frazer Road Woodseats.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Yorkyhells said:

Anyone remember Albert and May Potts who had the Sheaf on Frazer Road Woodseats.
 

I wasn't aware Lansdowne road ran up to Woodseats

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone have any info/memories/pictures of no.s 108 and 110 Lansdowne road? In the early 1900's no. 110 was a beerhouse run by my 2xgreat grandmother Sarah Padget. She died in 1914 and it was taken over by her son in law (my great grandfather) William Bullock. Also next door at 108 lived Sarah's son John Robert Hunt and his wife Aminda ( also known as Belinda or Linda) They where still living there in 1939 while the Bullocks had moved to Club Garden Road. If anyone knows anything we would be very greatful for more information. Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/07/2020 at 12:44, Leipzig said:

Hi Johnofwrong

 

The picture is Franklin Street, Lansdowne Road is in the background. Half of the front of the bakery can be seen directly behind the two women.

 

Link to picture: https://ibb.co/album/fYRc1G

 

 

Thanks!! Sorry for the late reply,  for some reason I've had no notifications 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 29/07/2021 at 18:57, Johnofwrong said:

Thanks!! Sorry for the late reply,  for some reason I've had no notifications 

I love that picture. Obviously in the war with all the steps whitened for the blackout, and look at the pile of horse muck!  I don't recognise the lad but if I'm right about the date then he would be a year or two older than me. What he's wearing was almost a uniform for Sharrow lads and I dare say for most working class lads of that era.  As for the ladies....every one a model for Last of the Summer Wine! I delivered bread for Topham's bakery in the 50s but I'd quite forgotten there had been a bakery in Lansdown Road. I would have passed it every day on my way to Denby St nursery both when I was a kid there and later when I had to take my younger sister there every morning before running back up to Sharrow Lane school.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DavidFrance said:

I love that picture. Obviously in the war with all the steps whitened for the blackout, and look at the pile of horse muck!  I don't recognise the lad but if I'm right about the date then he would be a year or two older than me. What he's wearing was almost a uniform for Sharrow lads and I dare say for most working class lads of that era.  As for the ladies....every one a model for Last of the Summer Wine! I delivered bread for Topham's bakery in the 50s but I'd quite forgotten there had been a bakery in Lansdown Road. I would have passed it every day on my way to Denby St nursery both when I was a kid there and later when I had to take my younger sister there every morning before running back up to Sharrow Lane school.  

there was also a small bakery on Langdon street at sharrow lane end

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/08/2021 at 21:30, MICK BADGER said:

there was also a small bakery on Langdon street at sharrow lane end

That was the bakehouse for Topham's. It also had a shop which wasn't always open, dependant on Mrs Bagnall's availability.  Mr Bagnall was the baker. Winnie ran the busier shop on Wolstenholm Road. The Sharrow Lane shop mostly sold bread whereas the main shop sold rather good pasties and many other things including wine and spirits.  The Bagnalls had two sons, Jeremy was the older but I can't remember the younger son's name.  I did a round on a basket bike all around Kenwood and Grange Crescent and Mr Bagnall finished off his long day with a round in a Ford van that went to Nether Edge and even as far as Nether Green. He was an amazing worker.  I can't recall how Topham's came to be owned by the Bagnalls. Maybe Mrs Bagnall was a Topham. 

What I can recall is going home every night with a bag of whatever buns or scones were left at closing time. But the bike was such hard work I was never going to get fat on it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there all Lansdowners  - I came across this forum purely by accident and what a day I've had!  Talk about a trip down memory lane - I have been blown away with happy memories of brilliant people I shared my life with.  My name is Elaine Turner and I lived at 54 - 79 and 85 respectively with my parents Frank and Elsie and my sisters Pat and Joyce.

 

Now where do I start?  Places first - Cheethams  fish and chip shop on Cliffe Street - woe betide anyone who was behind me in the queue on Saturday lunchtime as I took orders for half the street  to top up my spending money.  Mrs Green's pastry shop - now there was a lovely lady who I hold very dear to my heart - everything she made was delicious  from her chocolate lollies  - cream cakes and oh those meat pies!  When she started making them and word got around to Twist Drill and Neill's I remember never ending queues down the street and she was sold out in no time!  However my magic moments were Saturday mornings when I was privileged to 'work' there and see it all happening earning the princely sum of a shilling  (not bad for a ten year old!)  She was a kind lady with two daughters who I only slightly remember but Michael - her son - I remember well.   Then there was Robinsons shop - an open all hours establishment that sold everything bar the kitchen sink?  Fanny - another lovely and amazing woman who was an inspiration to me - working until we all had to leave due to demolition and she would be well into her eighties then.  She put her longevity down to having a guiness every day and by golly it worked because sometimes it would be well past nine o'clock when she closed.  I would be sent each weekday evening for my Dad's packing up and a loaf and the clips around the ear I got for biting the corners off the loaf and  sneaking a bit too much of the cooked meat  came all too frequently.   Her bachelor son Billy was a great guy too helping his mother all he could and always good for a laugh.  Her daughter Fay lived just above us for a while and she was the first person we knew to have a tv  - needless to say my sister and I were very good friends with Barbara her daughter!!!  The Club Garden pub and Mason's Arms round the corner provided a social life for Mum and Dad and I can hear the gatherings now outside the pubs on Saturday nights singing  well after closing time for thats what pubs were for then - a good old sing song!

 

To me the folks on Lansdowne Road were the salt of the earth!   Kids and Mums and Dads - here are just a few of those lovely people - Pauline Clark - my sister Pat's friend:  her cousin Judith next door: Rosie Elliott and her Mum Jesse - both of them always running:  Melvyn and Delyse Humphries:  the Hooper family - Kitty Pauline and an older sister: Patsy Crawford then Janet Douglas who emigrated alone to Australia (brave girl): next door was my friend Janet Foster (who sadly died some 30 years ago) and her brother Les (he used to help me with my paper round) and whose parents Winnie and Eddie always made me so welcome.  Mrs Foster could make a tea party out of bread and jam and their front room was the cosiest place on earth - especially in winter with a good fire and to top it all they had wall lights (a status symbol if ever there was one!)  Glynn Hadfield  was next and then the Baggott family - Hilary Jennifer  and an older sister:  on the other side of the road was Mavis Porter and her brother Brian - poor old Mavis (my sister Joyce's friend) was always getting a good hiding for one thing or another bless her:  next door was the Allen family - Bernard and Doreen whose two young boys Michael and Stephen I absolutely adored - I was their baby sitter and I couldn't spend enough time with them in fact they were both asked to be page boys at my wedding and  luckily for me I got Stephen to agree:  next door I remember our postwoman Ginny Bradley's mum and we used to have card schools there on Sunday nights:  the Websters were a little higher up - Margaret and Malcom their children were good friends: higher up the road were the Beardows - Arthur a really nice lad and his nephew (I think)  Jimmy - if ever I have met a "Just William" character Jimmy Beardow was it - always in trouble and I'm sure often getting blamed  for things he hadn't done but I loved him and would have adopted him as my little brother if I could!  Finally that leaves the Bagshaws - two brothers - the eldest being Melvin who always wore a winning smile and you could not meet a nicer lad - his Dad a jaunty chap always wore a white flat cap I remember and the family moved to Skegness.   I think it was for Melvin's health as he suffered breathing problems and sadly I learned sometime ago that he had passed away.

 

The bottom half of the road I remember the Rowans - Carrie and Fred and their two children David and Carol:  the Odales who suffered the tragedy of their son drowning whilst on holiday - my God that was heartbreaking!  The Windleys - another lovely family whose daughter Jean was a close friend of my sister Pat:  next came Mrs Jepson whose grandaughter Sandra Topliss was a friend of mine:  further down the road came the Corbetts and across the road were the Naylors - Michael and a younger brother I think:  then came the little sweet shop and above them in the yard  were the Days - Lorraine and Rodney and the Kiplings  - Sylvia and George who I knew well and their Dad was  a pub pal of my Dad's.   Mr and Mrs Booth lived in the same yard and as they didn't have any children they made  lot of me  taking me regularly to their tennis club - they made me feel so special bless them.  The yard above were the Wilds: the Hollinsheads and their son Peter:  Aunty Bella who had the fattest cat you have ever seen in you life (Mum used to trade our sweet rations with her for tea and sugar - which didn't go down very well with us three girls I can tell you!)  The Gavaghans  were also there - Nellie and her brothers and in the corner were the Hannimans - I remember Vera and Brenda very well - lovely young women.

 

Others that played a part in my life were from Pearl Street - Betty Smedley: Joy Chapman:  the Butler family with daughters Jeannie and Carol who were good friends of my sister Joyce and myself: then Georgie and Bett Lowe with their son Georgie came next with Bett's sister living next door:  across from them were the Barton's with their three daughters - Judy - Wendy - and a younger one - a real fun family and their Mum especially made me laugh!

 

When I think of all these people memories come flooding back:  sledging on the cobbles and flying after Dad had greased the irons on our home made sledge and then my sister getting a good hiding for sledging in her new astrakhan gloves and putting them on the hob to dry out (utterly ruined!)  - I can't remember if it was Pat or Joyce - I just thanked God it wasn't me!  My greatest hobby was marbles - I loved it and was good at it too.  Whenever possible I would take my oxo box full of marbles and set off to do business - selling them for four a penny  then playing the purchaser and hopefully winning them back.  My favourite hole was in the middle of the road outside Jowett's pawnbrokers and did that hole make me some money?   On many an occasion my lovely Dad would take me on one side and whisper "Elaine lend us half a dollar while the weekend so I can go for a pint" and it was my greatest pleasure to oblige but before he left for the pub I got the same instruction  ".......   and don't tell your mother!"  I also used to join a crowd and go and play on the logs - it was a storage  yard across London Road and off Boston Street - however someone wasn't killed there I will never know because when I think back now it was so dangerous.  Another great memory was marching with Georgie  Ashton and his troupe of kids at election time singing "Vote vote vote for Mr Mulley - you can't vote for a better man etc" at the top of our voices.  Oh happy days!  I feel truly blessed for living where I lived then and with whom I shared my life for as they say in Yorkshire "There's nowt wrong wi reight folk" and the folks around me were as I have previously said - the salt of the earth!!! 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A cracking post, its what this site is supposed to be about ,cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, DavidFrance said:

That was the bakehouse for Topham's. It also had a shop which wasn't always open, dependant on Mrs Bagnall's availability.  Mr Bagnall was the baker. Winnie ran the busier shop on Wolstenholm Road. The Sharrow Lane shop mostly sold bread whereas the main shop sold rather good pasties and many other things including wine and spirits.  The Bagnalls had two sons, Jeremy was the older but I can't remember the younger son's name.  I did a round on a basket bike all around Kenwood and Grange Crescent and Mr Bagnall finished off his long day with a round in a Ford van that went to Nether Edge and even as far as Nether Green. He was an amazing worker.  I can't recall how Topham's came to be owned by the Bagnalls. Maybe Mrs Bagnall was a Topham. 

What I can recall is going home every night with a bag of whatever buns or scones were left at closing time. But the bike was such hard work I was never going to get fat on it!

thanks for the info David I did wonder if it was Tophams

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.