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Norton Water Tower

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I dont think this has come up before, so does anyone know the History e.g when it was built etc etc:D

Edited by nikki-red

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there is a huge date stone on it, which IIRC is 1961....

 

My aunts parents used to live opposite it when i was young

they used to have open days wher you could goup to the obervation deck on top. I went up there once, it was a bit scary (I don't really like heights much at all)

 

The views over Sheffield and Derbyshire were stupendous!

 

I heard tell, (local legend I think) that on a clear day you could see all the way to Cleethorpes, though I have my doubts that the curve of the earth would allow us to see 90 miles or so. (and wouldn't it be the wrong side of sheffield to do that, anyway? from Keppels Column, perhaps...?)

 

PT

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I love the graffiti on the side "Warning John '0' Gaunt ahead

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Slightly off topic but I remember some grafitti at the junction of East Bank Rd at the lights which then head down towards Newfield Green shops and ultimately Gleadless Valley which simply said "Welcome to Hell".

 

I thought it was quite amusing.

 

Been washed off now tho.

 

On the subject of seeing cleethorpes from the top of the water tower, you've have a better chance on top of the Herdings flats (aka the sisters) which is the highest point in Sheffield.

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I went up it once, cant remember when, must have been the late seventies/ early eighties. Vaguely recall a lift in the middle, pipes running down side with labels, open/ closed signs on valves. Also used to walk over the covered reservoir on way home from Gleadless Valley School.

 

Cant remember the view! Probably the main thing about going up there.

 

I'm sure I've seen a thread on here about how for you can see from highest points in Sheffield. I think its Lincoln Cathedral, there were links in the thread to sites with calculations to show how far you could theoretically see.

 

I can see the water tower from my house.

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I know for a fact that you can see it from Gringly-on-the-Hill near Gainsboro on a clear day.

It must make a fortune in rental space for the Council, if they still own it, as it's like a porkupine these days with all the aerial masts and microwave dishes on top of it, as well as its original function to keep the water pressure up. I live near the bottom of Blackstock Rd, and our water pressure can be frightening. A far cry from our caravan at Ingoldmells, where it's like p**s.

:|

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What IS it for????????

 

 

:confused: :confused: :confused: :confused:

 

storing water i presume

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Water needs to be stored high up so that it has enough height to give pressure and flow at your house. When there isn't a reservoir available at a high enough level above a district, a tower is needed.

In flat areas like lincolnshire and american praries, watertowers are much more common. And for the same reason many tall buildings have their own water stored on the roof, which will have to be pumped up from a ground level tank.

 

Norton water tower is next to an underground reservoir. What usually happens is that an electric pump slowly fills up the tank at the top of the tower from the reservoir, and this water is used to supply a high pressure water main, which will feed he adjacent area. The tower will have electric devices to monitor the level in the tower and to stop ice forming in the winter. In many water towers they have a "football" or a float on the surface which stops ice making a complete seal across the top of the water because this could cause a vacuum and stop the water from falling.

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Water needs to be stored high up so that it has enough height to give pressure and flow at your house. When there isn't a reservoir available at a high enough level above a district, a tower is needed.

In flat areas like lincolnshire and american praries, watertowers are much more common. And for the same reason many tall buildings have their own water stored on the roof, which will have to be pumped up from a ground level tank.

 

Norton water tower is next to an underground reservoir. What usually happens is that an electric pump slowly fills up the tank at the top of the tower from the reservoir, and this water is used to supply a high pressure water main, which will feed he adjacent area. The tower will have electric devices to monitor the level in the tower and to stop ice forming in the winter. In many water towers they have a "football" or a float on the surface which stops ice making a complete seal across the top of the water because this could cause a vacuum and stop the water from falling.

 

 

Thank you SOOO much muddy - have wondered that for years!!!!!

 

:D :D :D :D :D

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The Water Towers There For All Them Telephone Masts,which Are Plastered All Over It......another Money Making Scam For Yorkshire Water......

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