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Update on Origin Broadband's plans following closure of DRL

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thanks for the confirmation.

 

 

out of curiosity. what is going to happen to the DR Network? i cant believe that cables will be ripped out of the ducts. and am surprised that one of the big players hasnt picked it up for a song.

 

surely it would be cheaper for BT to take it over than for them to upgrade all their own cabs

 

From what I have heard the Digital Region fibre network runs on a different technology to the BT one so they couldn't simply buy it up and connect it to their existing network.

 

As BT lay their fibre in existing ducts anyway, the cost is nowhere near as high as it was for Digital Region themselves to do everything from scratch. Sadly at this point it does mean a perfectly good network will be doing to waste.

 

In other bad news, yes we will be restricted to the BT limit of 80/20 when moved over. This really sucks when I am currently connected at 100/33 but for some reason BT have not unlocked the full speed of their network. I had kinda hoped they would have done before Origin had to do this.

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In other bad news, yes we will be restricted to the BT limit of 80/20 when moved over. This really sucks when I am currently connected at 100/33 but for some reason BT have not unlocked the full speed of their network. I had kinda hoped they would have done before Origin had to do this.

 

 

same here.

 

BT are essentially CRAP. i will lose the same speed as you.

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This really sucks when I am currently connected at 100/33

 

Your getting 100/33 because there's only like 3 people connected to DR, imagine how much faster you would get to work on the motorway if there was only 3 people using it.

 

same here.

 

BT are essentially CRAP. i will lose the same speed as you.

 

Go tell that to the people who are lucky if they can get 2meg down and 100kb up, I'm sure their hearts would bleed for your inconvenience.

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Go tell that to the people who are lucky if they can get 2meg down and 100kb up, I'm sure their hearts would bleed for your inconvenience.

 

yup the reason people are getting 2meg is because of BT. they own the monopoly and have dragged their feet rolling out FTC for far too long.

 

i have no idea why people defend such an infective company as BT. the more competitors the better. force BT to up their game.

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i have no idea why people defend such an infective company as BT. the more competitors the better. force BT to up their game.

 

I use BT because in my experience they have been the best phone and broadband provider I have ever used, I've tried other providers that have provided poor customer service, poor and next to no fault recognition and repair and generally been a nightmare from start to finish.

 

BT have never acted in this way and have also been known to make me aware of faults that I didn't know about, and come an fixed them straight away more or less, my BB never drops off and I always get a quality speed.

 

While ever they provide a service like this they will always get my money.

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well in my experience. Origin provided 80meg to my property 3 years before BT. and now i will be having to downgrade.

 

and i have never had to contact Origin about faults, not had any.

 

---------- Post added 13-05-2014 at 23:39 ----------

 

Origin are the little company, who if i wished to i could call and get a person. not a drone in a call centre.

BT are a faceless monopoly.

 

i know which of the two i would rather give my money to. same reason i try to shop in independent shops. I support the little guys and like my money to stay local.

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i know which of the two i would rather give my money to. same reason i try to shop in independent shops. I support the little guys and like my money to stay local.

 

Totally agree, I love to see local business thrive. Unfortunately I was never able to use Origin (Always wanted to) due to our cabinet not being DR enabled :| and like I said due to the service I get from BT I will be hard pushed to ever change providers.

Edited by Dardandec
Typo

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Totally agree, I love to see local business thrive. Unfortunately I was never able to use Origin (Always wanted to) due to our cabinet not being DR enabled :| and like I said due to the service I get from BT I will be hard pushed to ever change providers.

 

Once Origin move off DR, they'll be on BT's (BT Openreach) network. You can move safe in the knowledge that you'll still be on BT's network, but not on BT's Customer Service.

 

K.

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From what I have heard the Digital Region fibre network runs on a different technology to the BT one so they couldn't simply buy it up and connect it to their existing network.

 

The fibre is fundamentally the same (Fibre optic is fibre optic i.e throw a laser down a light tube) it's how it's terminated, the type of light and the wavelengths that make the difference. BT could easily incorporate the DR fibre into their own network, they'd just need to change equipment in the cabs. They'd have extra cabinet space in each area that they do this so they could provide diversionary traffic paths and redundancy to their own network but they won't want to do this because then South Yorkshire would have a 'better' Fibre rollout than other areas. They also don't want to be responsible for more on-street assets than they need to, as the associated costs of maintenance against more 'street furniture' wouldn't make a good business case.

 

BT have a history of always sweating their old assets for as long as possible in order to get the maximum return on investment, and only upgrading when they have a business need. Backtrack to 2005 when BT announced that they were upgrading ADSL line speeds - they did this because of the way that they were charging ISPs for data usage was changing, and the faster customers could get data across the network, the more they'd download and the more profit BT stood to make. They also figured that ISPs would need to upgrade their backhaul networks in order to cope with the additional capacity that customers would require in order to utilise the increased speeds before network contention kicked in at the ISP side. The majority of ISPs were lighting up 155MBps and 622MBps trunks at that time. They at that point could have rolled IPSream MAX (up to 8Mbps rate adaptive) as soon as each DSLAM in each exchange was upgraded (they were upgrading the DSLAMs/line cards to enable the newer technology) but instead rolled up to 2Mbit in the first year, then the following year rolled up to 8Mbps. Why? So multiple upgrades could be made, and more price jumps/hikes could be given/justified - every regrade order than an ISP made outside of the BT uplift was charged for, and they knew that customers would either pay for an expedited uplift especially if they saw others on the same exchange with faster speeds, or the ISPs would foot the bill as part of any customer complaint in order to avoid ombudsmen complaints. BT also knew that the faults generated by the uplift, whilst being an inconvenience to many customers may mean that people migrated back to BT thinking that they'd get a better service. Separately, around this time was when Ofcom ordered BT Wholesale to treat LLU ISPs the same as their own customers and BT offspun their engineers to become Openreach (they'd been incorporated into Wholesale before) Conveniently enough too, this was also the time that BT introduced customer penalty charges for missed engineer appointments, and false call out charges if a fault was not found to be with the BT network. Lots of customers suffered as a result of network speed uplifts, from basic filters being too flaky and out of spec to handle higher and more sensitive line speeds. All of this meant more profit for BT at the time - customers have since learnt more about the xDSL/PSTN networks because of this through necessity, in order to reduce the possibility of any false callout charges.

 

 

Once Origin move off DR, they'll be on BT's (BT Openreach) network. You can move safe in the knowledge that you'll still be on BT's network, but not on BT's Customer Service.

 

K.

 

It's actually BT Wholesale's network i.e it's BT Wholesale's products (In the ADSL world it was IPStream etc. In the PSTN world now other providers sell WLR or 'Wholesale Line Rental' - The clue is in the name there...) BT Openreach are just the engineer department that make sure that the physical assets of BT and the different LLU network providers are interfaced correctly.

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Your getting 100/33 because there's only like 3 people connected to DR, imagine how much faster you would get to work on the motorway if there was only 3 people using it.

 

Not true, I am getting 100/33 because I have a short high quality line and Digital Region do not artificially limit my speed.

 

There are plenty of people on BT already which have a max attainable as high as mine, but BT have the maximum sync speeds capped on their DLM.

 

I am still subject to the same crosstalk I would be if I were on the BT cabinet, because the crosstalk happens in the cable bundle from the cabinet up to the house. Heck, my max attainable is actually 110/33 so there is still some leeway for a little more crosstalk before my download speed drops.

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Not true, I am getting 100/33 because I have a short high quality line and Digital Region do not artificially limit my speed.

 

There are plenty of people on BT already which have a max attainable as high as mine, but BT have the maximum sync speeds capped on their DLM.

 

I am still subject to the same crosstalk I would be if I were on the BT cabinet, because the crosstalk happens in the cable bundle from the cabinet up to the house. Heck, my max attainable is actually 110/33 so there is still some leeway for a little more crosstalk before my download speed drops.

 

All well and good but I think you'll find most of it is down to traffic ;) there's more than 3 people connected to BT fibre ;) Friday evenings is the best time for max speed. I will eagerly await the updates on your sig ;)

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I was under the impression BT are pretty keen to keep on top of contention at the cabinets.

 

I certainly doubt my cabinet would have such a problem as the people round here do not seem exactly technically minded. I would be surprised if anyone on my cabinet knows what a torrent is.

 

Its rather besides the point anyway as DLM caps at 80/20. Like I said, the VDSL CAN handle 100/33, at no point did I say the backhaul could handle every customer doing that at the same time. But as most of my downloading is the early hours of the morning or during the day, I don't think I would have a problem.

Edited by AlexAtkin

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