Jump to content
Fancy running a forum? Sheffield Forum is for sale! Learn more

Canon SLR FILM with EF Lenses advice please

Recommended Posts

I have just been given a Canon EOS 500 FILM SLR and 2 lenses, a Canon EF 80-200 mm and a Canon EF 35-80 mm.

I have a couple of questions, how much is developing and printing these days and would these lenses fit and work on a digital SLR ??

They are 52mm, so excusing my ignorance, which digital SLR would they fit.

Excuse my ignorance as I currently use a Bridge camera and a small Canon Ixus and have no experience of SLR's or film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Canon digital SLR's have the same Canon bayonet mount as the film camera's so the lenses will fit any Canon body. There may be some functional differences due to electronic contacts such as for auto focus, and there will be a crop factor with smaller sensors

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The older FD lens won't fit on a DSLR. But you are fine with EF lens as above you might just loose some of the features like autofocus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. I shall try a bit of film photography first, then I may try to find a cheap Canon digital body.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i only use EF lenses. i have EOS film bodies and a digital SLR, the focal length changes but all that means is 28mm becomes 40mm (on a cropped sensor camera that is) AF still works. Use it, enjoy it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the replies. I shall try a bit of film photography first, then I may try to find a cheap Canon digital body.

 

Then junk the digital because it isn't as fun ;)

 

No amount of hours sat in front of Photoshop compares to the joy (and quality) of a lovingly produced print in a darkroom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Then junk the digital because it isn't as fun ;)

 

No amount of hours sat in front of Photoshop compares to the joy (and quality) of a lovingly produced print in a darkroom.

 

Total rubbish :hihi:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Total rubbish :hihi:

 

I agree, been there done that. Lightroom for me, but hey, each to their own. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that Lightroom is very powerful and an essential tool for workflow - but it still doesn't beat the joy I get when I lock myself away for a session of lovingly creating a print - it's like taking the photo all over again. And finishes with a print I can hold in my hands, whereas I find I rarely bother to print my digital work or scanned slides. As you say, each to their own, but as the OP is dipping their toe into the chemical bath of film photography, I would suggest they have a go at the silver gelatine process, as they may well enjoy it, not to mention the good grounding of education it gives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree, been there done that. Lightroom for me, but hey, each to their own. :)

 

Ok so maybe my comment of total rubbish was a bit harsh, I remember doing this back in school and it was pretty cool but it required a lot of skill to get right, I can see how satisfying it is though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I never said it was easy :) Kinda my point though - anyone can pick up lightroom and drag a slider to fix a digital photo, but to create a truly beautiful silver gelatine print is a much more rewarding experience - not to mention one that you could spend your whole life perfecting the art of! I must have read half a dozen lengthy books on the subject and still have a way to go. Of course, you can spend that time learning Photoshop and be more relevant to the 21st century than I am :D Swings and roundabouts, but for me it's more fun on the DARK SIDE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Different strokes for different folks……

 

Personally I feel my work would be missing out on only choosing one side of the same coin.

 

Lightroom,

Darkroom,

 

Try to concentrate on whats in front of the lens instead of romanticising whats behind it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.