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Farfield Inn, Neepsend Lane.

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It survived the Sheffield flood and appears on lots of early photographs of sheffield recording the flood damage.

 

It's an important point of reference in that respect.

 

That's not a good reason to keep it standing forever though.

It won't disappear from the photos, but unless it has something special then it's just an old building, like many more.

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That's not a good reason to keep it standing forever though.

It won't disappear from the photos, but unless it has something special then it's just an old building, like many more.

 

In which case not much point excavating Sheffield Castle is there, not even an old building just earthworks.

 

And can someone alter the title it's Farfield Inn.

 

https://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk/forums/topic/15537-the-farfield-inn-the-owl-pub-in-neepsend-sheffield/

Edited by retep

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That's not a good reason to keep it standing forever though.

It won't disappear from the photos, but unless it has something special then it's just an old building, like many more.

 

Well that's your opinion which you're entitled to of course.

 

I think where we can re-use/refurbish listed buildings, and in this instance one which was the backdrop for a historic event like the Sheffield flood, it's a good thing.

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That's not a good reason to keep it standing forever though.

It won't disappear from the photos, but unless it has something special then it's just an old building, like many more.

 

I think it's rarity in itself gives it enough merit to be kept. It's a rare (the only?) surviving example of a Georgian farmhouse in the area. A listing can be for historical interest, not just architectural.

Edited by Olive

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Cheers for the photo and map links I didn't see that one when I was looking.

 

 

 

Went for over 2.5 times the £95000 guide price, obviously the buyer is looking to the future redevelopment around there, can't see why else you would pay all that money.

 

https://www.thestar.co.uk/news/grade-ii-listed-pub-in-sheffield-sells-for-two-and-a-half-times-guide-price-at-auction-1-8993066

Edited by iansheff

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I think it's rarity in itself give it enough merit to be kept. It's a rare (the only?) surviving example of a Georgian farmhouse in the area. A listing can be for historical interest, not just architectural.

 

Here's a great early photograph of it. Apparently from 1864.

 

http://www.mick-armitage.staff.shef.ac.uk/sheffield/photogal/farfld-o.jpg

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I think it's rarity in itself gives it enough merit to be kept. It's a rare (the only?) surviving example of a Georgian farmhouse in the area. A listing can be for historical interest, not just architectural.

 

Presumably that would apply to every type of building at some point. The only building of type 'x' left in the area.

Personally I don't think that's a reason to keep a building.

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Presumably that would apply to every type of building at some point. The only building of type 'x' left in the area.

Personally I don't think that's a reason to keep a building.

 

There is no reason why that would apply to every type of building at some point. It would only apply if it got to a point when it was the last of its type (e.g the last terraced house in Walkley, or Sheffield) and that is unlikely to happen for the majority of buildings.

 

When a building is a rarity because there are few of them left in an area, such as cruck framed buildings in England, or old back to back houses in Birmingham, then I think that is precisely why they should be offered greater protection so that all examples are not lost forever.

 

Fortunately, Historic England agree.

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There is no reason why that would apply to every type of building at some point. It would only apply if it got to a point when it was the last of its type (e.g the last terraced house in Walkley, or Sheffield) and that is unlikely to happen for the majority of buildings.

 

When a building is a rarity because there are few of them left in an area, such as cruck framed buildings in England, or old back to back houses in Birmingham, then I think that is precisely why they should be offered greater protection so that all examples are not lost forever.

 

Fortunately, Historic England agree.

 

Couldn't agree more. It's also an incredibly well known Sheffield landmark and has survived two floods. It deserves to stay and be returned to its former glory!

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Presumably that would apply to every type of building at some point. The only building of type 'x' left in the area.

Personally I don't think that's a reason to keep a building.

 

Well yes, I guess so. That's pretty much the jist behind the idea for preserving buildings through listing them. Sooner or later common things become rare and interesting, that's why we have museums. That's why there have been post war prefabs being listed. I tried looking up the reasons for listing the Farfield, but the information hasn't been transferred onto the English Heritage website. There's some detail on the building, but not the reason for listing. Would be interesting to know.

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On a general point about old buildings, I was waiting for a bus in Hillsborough the other day where the bridge is when I noticed that the tops of the buildings of the shops and businesses, such as the Pizza and Co and the barbers, are impressively ornate, albeit a bit shabby looking.

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