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Farfield Inn, Neepsend Lane.

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Well yes, I guess so. That's pretty much the jist behind the idea for preserving buildings through listing them. Sooner or later common things become rare and interesting, that's why we have museums. That's why there have been post war prefabs being listed. I tried looking up the reasons for listing the Farfield, but the information hasn't been transferred onto the English Heritage website. There's some detail on the building, but not the reason for listing. Would be interesting to know.

 

When they become rare generally, or they are outstanding in some way, absolutely.

Just "the last one left in an industrial estate", not good enough IMO.

 

---------- Post added 02-02-2018 at 21:04 ----------

 

There is no reason why that would apply to every type of building at some point. It would only apply if it got to a point when it was the last of its type (e.g the last terraced house in Walkley, or Sheffield) and that is unlikely to happen for the majority of buildings.

 

When a building is a rarity because there are few of them left in an area, such as cruck framed buildings in England, or old back to back houses in Birmingham, then I think that is precisely why they should be offered greater protection so that all examples are not lost forever.

 

Fortunately, Historic England agree.

 

So when I asked earlier someone said it's the last of it's type in the area. Perhaps they meant in Sheffield and I misunderstood?

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When they become rare generally, or they are outstanding in some way, absolutely.

Just "the last one left in an industrial estate", not good enough IMO.

 

Good enough for me. In this particular case at a any rate. Especially given it's historical significance. Why does it have to be the last remaining Georgian building in the whole of Sheffield before its important enough to retain? You need to consider a building in context. The Farfield is a one of the only pre-industrial buildings in an area where Sheffield grew to become an industrial powerhouse. It survived the great flood. It's part of the story.

Edited by Olive

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When they become rare generally, or they are outstanding in some way, absolutely.

Just "the last one left in an industrial estate", not good enough IMO.

 

---------- Post added 02-02-2018 at 21:04 ----------

 

 

So when I asked earlier someone said it's the last of it's type in the area. Perhaps they meant in Sheffield and I misunderstood?

 

I don't think anyone's claiming that it's the last of its type in the whole of Sheffield, nor that it would need to be in order for it to be worthy of listing.

 

What is meant by 'area' in this context has to be defined on a case by case basis, depending on the particular circumstances. In this case, the building is one of the very few buildings left from what (I presume) would have been a rural settlement on the outskirts of Sheffield. It is a rare survivor of Sheffield's pre-industrial heritage (it apparently being built as a 'Gentlemen's Residence' in 1753) and is a reminder of the city's growth and evolution.

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When they become rare generally, or they are outstanding in some way, absolutely.

Just "the last one left in an industrial estate", not good enough IMO.

 

I think that although this has turned into a bit of an argument, I think here, rather than black/white, there is a fine line - and several posters are on either side (me included, but not in yours on this one)

 

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I tend to think that too many good/historic buildings are lost because of the fact that 'there are plenty of others', and eventually there aren't any.

 

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Answer me this, if you would care to (without claiming strawman, as possible because it is a bit! :hihi:)... how many back to back houses were there in Sheffield, pre-slum clearance? And how many examples do we have now to show the young en's?

 

---------- Post added 02-02-2018 at 23:26 ----------

 

haha, I would even claim that as a strawman, even though I wrote it!!

 

won't someone think of the children!! :hihi:

 

:)

 

There's little point in me posting again because I'm not going to argue. I want it to survive and no argument would change my mind.

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Good enough for me. In this particular case at a any rate. Especially given it's historical significance. Why does it have to be the last remaining Georgian building in the whole of Sheffield before its important enough to retain? You need to consider a building in context. The Farfield is a one of the only pre-industrial buildings in an area where Sheffield grew to become an industrial powerhouse. It survived the great flood. It's part of the story.

 

It was part of the story, now it's an unused, unloved nearly derelict building of which there are other better examples.

Knocking it down won't remove it from history, but it will make room for the future.

 

---------- Post added 03-02-2018 at 08:31 ----------

 

I don't think that's a strawman ash. I don't know of any examples of back to back slums that have been retained, which rather goes to prove my point that there's no need.

Does anyone feel the loss of them?

 

Hopefully this "argument" feels civil and polite, it's all just a matter of opinion at the end of the day, there's no objective truth to be had. We're big enough people to not agree aren't we?

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It was part of the story, now it's an unused, unloved nearly derelict building of which there are other better examples.

Knocking it down won't remove it from history, but it will make room for the future.

 

---------- Post added 03-02-2018 at 08:31 ----------

 

I don't think that's a strawman ash. I don't know of any examples of back to back slums that have been retained, which rather goes to prove my point that there's no need.

Does anyone feel the loss of them?

 

Hopefully this "argument" feels civil and polite, it's all just a matter of opinion at the end of the day, there's no objective truth to be had. We're big enough people to not agree aren't we?

 

It's a civilised discussion, they still happen!

 

I'm not one for preserving everything for the sake of it. In the Farfield Inn's case, I'll have to disagree with you. There aren't actually that many examples of houses from this particular period in Sheffield, and I can't think of any examples in the vicinity.

 

There are a very few examples of back to backs surviving. There are some near West Bar, which you wouldn't realise were houses because they've been used as workshops for a long time. There are some one room deep houses on Canning Street, off Division Street which have survived as well. You can go on guided walks around town, looking at the hidden history which is told through the surviving buildings, I think it's the Victorian Society who do them. Really fascinating.

 

I've no wish to fossilise a place, and I know that buildings can easily become redundant. It's often difficult to find a viable purpose for a building which has outlived its original use. Look at the church in the middle of Wadsley Park estate.

 

But In my opinion, a pleasant and successful townscape is one whichn is a mix of old and new. One which tells a story through its rich fabric.

Edited by Olive

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For me the key here is not the pub , but the land it sits on. Personally it would be far more profitable to demolish it and build a brand new block of apartments on the plot increasing the original footprints of the existing building. Factor in the cost of repair to the pub, plus the conversion into ,say , six units .A new build on a larger scale incorporating more units would mean brand new apartments which would be more attractive to buyers or renters ,and more profit for the developer.

 

I just cannot see any purpose in renovating an old ,badly run down pub .

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They can't knock it down. It's grade listed as a historic building ..

 

http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/showpost.php?p=11801728&postcount=72

 

That unfortunately doesn't mean you can't knock it down. Permission would be hard to get, but it could be granted by the council nonetheless.

 

The Jessop's Hosptial Building is Grade II listed, however the Council granted permission to knock down the Edwardian wing of that so that the Diamond could be built..

 

https://www.savebritainsheritage.org/campaigns/article/260/Sheffield-City-Council-approves-demolition-of-Grade-II-listed-Edwardian-Jessop-Hospital-despite-objections-from-the-heritage-sector

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I don't think that's a strawman ash. I don't know of any examples of back to back slums that have been retained, which rather goes to prove my point that there's no need.

Does anyone feel the loss of them?

 

I'd love to see an example of what they've done in Birmingham. OK, I would admit that it wouldn't pull enough for tourists in Sheffield, mind.

 

I don't think we feel the loss of them. If they demolished Kelham Island and Abbeydale Inustrial Hamlet for example, I would feel no physical or mental loss, however, I think a lot can be gained by the presence of them. Young people (school age) can and I would argue - should - be able to learn how different life was, in another era, without just resorting to photographs.

 

Hopefully this "argument" feels civil and polite, it's all just a matter of opinion at the end of the day, there's no objective truth to be had. We're big enough people to not agree aren't we?

 

It's certainly more civil than many in here!

 

There are a very few examples of back to backs surviving. There are some near West Bar, which you wouldn't realise were houses because they've been used as workshops for a long time.

 

I didn't think any remained in Sheffield.

 

However, on same area, I think a really good example of using old space is the Cutlery Works.

 

I've no wish to fossilise a place, and I know that buildings can easily become redundant. It's often difficult to find a viable purpose for a building which has outlived its original use. Look at the church in the middle of Wadsley Park estate.

 

But In my opinion, a pleasant and successful townscape is one whichn is a mix of old and new. One which tells a story through its rich fabric.

 

Me too. Also included in the WPV of course is Kingswood Hall, which is one of the best examples I've ever seen for keeping old building. It's in my top few best buildings in Sheffield, for me.

 

Look what happened to the pheasant at lane top and was that not a listed building ?

 

Yes, good example, and tbh, if the front only was kept of the Farfield, I wouldn't be displeased.

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Look what happened to the pheasant at lane top and was that not a listed building ?

 

I don't think The Pheasant is a listed building.

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