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Did anyone know Mr Nurnable?

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Good day

I am the son of a French resistant of the Ain department who fought with Mr. Gordon Nornable. During the operations of the German attack of July 44 on the region of "Haut Bugey" my father was young liaison officer and after the battle of the "Col de la Lèbe" near the small town of "Hauteville" he recovered Lieutenant Gordon Nornable who was injured (the nom de guerre of Nornable Gordon was "Bayard") and led to a family farm where he was hiding and neat. After the war Mr. "Bayard" returning every year in the region for meetings of veterans of the maquis into the 60s and it was always a visit to my parents' house where he was staying. My father always exchanged New Year greetings with him at the following address: "13 little Norton Lane Sheffield.".

Child I have very good memories of this discreet and charming man, a young lieutenant explosive instructor had disembarked from a Dakota on the night of July 6 to 7, 44 to come and help our liberation. My father was five years younger than Gordon, he died in 2011, a few days before his death he still spoke of "Bayard" and the maquis adventures. RIP

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Hello Marcien.

Thank you for replying to this thread. I think it's important that people realise the enormous debt that we all owe your fathers generation. I think today's young have no idea of the horrors they went through. The bravery of the Resistance Movement and the sacrifices made by so many should never be forgotten

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Not seen him for years but I had a friend called Andy Nornable who lived somewhere around Little Norton Lane when I knew him and he was keen on cricket, I think he may have been an umpire if I remember right. He would not far off 60 now. I was just wondering if he is a relation after reading this post

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Hi,

Several years later I see this thread whilst research Gordon’s story for my son.  

 

So, Harry Nornable was my Grandfather, his wife Edith Ward my Grandmother.  They had 2 children, one my mother and Jane the QA nurse and senior matron at the Hallamshire.     Jane has no children and sadly passed away a few years ago.   They did all indeed live in Bromwhich Road, 13 and 14.  I’m not sure if Gordon lived on the same road.   Gordon was my grandfathers cousin.

 

Gordon moved  to his father’s home on Little Norton Lane, to care for him in his old age and remained there until he passed away.   Gordon was never married and did not have any children.  Both he and my Grandpa regularly went to the Abbey.  

 

Gordon was mad keen on Cricket, the whole family were!

 

 Marcien, Gordon spoke of your father and his visits to you.  

 

Gordon was indeed a hero of WW2 - highly decorated and many stories told.  Especially to other military members of the family!  

 

 

Nornable is certainly an an unusual surname.  In fact Gordon traces it all the way back to 1066, when our ancestors arrived here with William the concurer.  The name was then ‘De Normanville’ , it has evolved over the years into Nornable.  

 

Hope that clears up a Few questions. X

 

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On 13/02/2019 at 11:53, Akiem said:

Hi,

Several years later I see this thread whilst research Gordon’s story for my son.  

 

So, Harry Nornable was my Grandfather, his wife Edith Ward my Grandmother.  They had 2 children, one my mother and Jane the QA nurse and senior matron at the Hallamshire.     Jane has no children and sadly passed away a few years ago.   They did all indeed live in Bromwhich Road, 13 and 14.  I’m not sure if Gordon lived on the same road.   Gordon was my grandfathers cousin.

 

Gordon moved  to his father’s home on Little Norton Lane, to care for him in his old age and remained there until he passed away.   Gordon was never married and did not have any children.  Both he and my Grandpa regularly went to the Abbey.  

 

Gordon was mad keen on Cricket, the whole family were!

 

 Marcien, Gordon spoke of your father and his visits to you.  

 

Gordon was indeed a hero of WW2 - highly decorated and many stories told.  Especially to other military members of the family!  

 

 

Nornable is certainly an an unusual surname.  In fact Gordon traces it all the way back to 1066, when our ancestors arrived here with William the concurer.  The name was then ‘De Normanville’ , it has evolved over the years into Nornable.  

 

Hope that clears up a Few questions. X

 

Thanks, Akiem, RIP to a lovely gent. A pleasure to have met him.

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