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Did anyone know Mr Nurnable?

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My grandma and grandad knew this affable rosy-cheeked gent, who sadly died a few years ago.

 

He was a very quiet but friendly and polite man, always wore a trenchcoat and flat cap (and shirt/tie), was a keen cricket fan (he used to watch me bowl/bat as a kid) and frequented The Abbey pub.

 

My grandparents always said he had been a spy during WWII (or at least, SOE Operative, as he was 'missing' for lengthy spells during the war), which I always took with a pinch of salt.

 

A mate and me used to buy him a drink and ask him WW2 questions etc, but if he'd been trained to resist Gestapo torture, he wasn't going to reveal Official Secrets to a couple of half-baked chancers, was he?

 

But sure enough, I read a booklet in the Central library's local archive section which mentioned a 'Mr Nurnable' (surely him?) who had been an SOE/resistance fighter, parachuted into occupied France at great risk, to aid and train the Maquis!

 

Brave, lovely man. RIP.

Edited by Electerrific

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My grandma and grandad knew this affable rosy-cheeked gent, who sadly died a few years ago.

 

He was a very quiet but friendly and polite man, always wore a trenchcoat and flat cap (and shirt/tie), was a keen cricket fan (he used to watch me bowl/bat as a kid) and frequented The Abbey pub.

 

My grandparents always said he had been a spy during WWII (or at least, SOE Operative, as he was 'missing' for lengthy spells during the war), which I always took with a pinch of salt.

 

A mate and me used to buy him a drink and ask him WW2 questions etc, but if he'd been trained to resist Gestapo torture, he wasn't going to reveal Official Secrets to a couple of half-baked chancers, was he?

 

But sure enough, I read a booklet in the Central library's local archive section which mentioned a 'Mr Nurnable' (surely him?) who had been an SOE/resistance fighter, parachuted into occupied France at great risk, to aid and train the Maquis!

 

Brave, lovely man. RIP.

 

The only surname which I can see on Ancestry which is similar (can't actually see one with the spelling of Nurnable) is a family named NORNABLE who lived Woodseats area.

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The Nornable family lived on Bromwich Rd. I'm struggling to remember his first name. His wife I'm sure was called Edith and they had a daughter Jane who died comparatively recently

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The Nornable family lived on Bromwich Rd. I'm struggling to remember his first name. His wife I'm sure was called Edith and they had a daughter Jane who died comparatively recently

 

There's a Robert H.G. Nornable marriage to an Edith Ward with 2 daughters born into this marriage but, I'll not name them for reasons of confidentiality, both born Sheffield.

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The surname was NORNABLE, a real gentleman who worked in the Town Hall. Lived on Little Norton Lane near the junction with Meadowhead.

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Yes guys, you're right, it was spelt with an 'O'. From memory. He indeed lived on Little Norton as I remember.

 

Did anyone know him?

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The surname was NORNABLE, a real gentleman who worked in the Town Hall. Lived on Little Norton Lane near the junction with Meadowhead.

 

When I moved to the area in the 60s. The Nornables were living on Bromwich Rd. At some point, I remember now, they moved to Little Norton Lane but I think their daughter stayed in the house once they'd left.

I can't remember seeing him in the Abbey but that may be that he was a tap room regular. You could be a regular in the lounge in those days and have no idea who frequented the other room.

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Thanks, he seemed a lovely gentleman, very unassuming and private, but always cheerful and polite.

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I played cricket with Gordon Nornable at Sheffield United Cricket Club in the late '60s. As other people have suggested, he was a charming gentleman who had time to talk and advise the younger players. Just check his details on Wikipdedia to see what a hero he was.

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I played cricket with Gordon Nornable at Sheffield United Cricket Club in the late '60s. As other people have suggested, he was a charming gentleman who had time to talk and advise the younger players. Just check his details on Wikipdedia to see what a hero he was.

I never realised that he was on Wiki, or that it was that long ago when he sadly passed on!

 

The curious reference to him serving in ''the Special Service'' must mean either the SAS or the SOE? My gramps both knew him (my grandad played cricket too, although I can't remember who for), and said that during the war they and others thought that Gordon was 'away doing something secret' for the army. Seems they were right.

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Some of the information that comes up when you Google his name is quite remarkable.

Oddly it seems to say that he never married and lived like a recluse for 20 years. It could be that his wife died in the early 80s but married he certainly was and his daughter was a neighbour of mine.

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