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Considering breeding my Lhasa Apso - advice needed

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I've got a beautiful pedigree Lhasa, she's 100% healthy (regular vet checks) and a fabulous nature. I am considering breeding her - as I would like to keep a pup from her myself. Obviously I would want an appropriate mate - with full pedigree - and I would discuss this in depth with my vet, but has anyone got any advice? I have never bred before (this will be a 1 time thing!) - how would I go about finding the right stud? (Mines small breed - therefore I would want a small breed stud). And advice would be welcomed.

Thanks

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you know what most of us are going to say, don't you?

 

It's not the best of ideas when there are so many dogs and cats already abandoned to shelters.

 

First and foremost, will you have a waiting list of resonsible and checked-out prospective owners for all the puppies your dam might produce?

 

what age is your bitch? it's best to have let her have a season or two to allow her to mature enough to carry the pups. don't put her to stud too young.

 

Are you prepared for the health risks to the dam and the pups? (eg needing to rush the dam to the vet for an emerency caesar cos the pups are stuck- and it always happens at 3am, never during practice hours!) judging by your comment about her being small, then I'd really look into disproportion, where the bitch's pelvis is too narrow for the pups. (can be common in smaller breeds)

 

Are you prepared for the mess of the birth?

 

Are you prepared for the mess and hassle of up to half a dozen non-housebroken pups?

 

Are you prepared for the financial cost of feeding a pregnant/ nursing dam and the pups when they arrive?

 

Do you have a realistic idea of what having pups entails for the dam, the household and you?

 

You aren't going by the old fallacy "let her have just the one litter..." are you? because in all honesty, what she's never had, she'd never miss.

 

Sorry about this sounding like I'm a nay-sayer, but my philosophy is "Spay and neuter"... Don't breed whilst-ever there are examples of that breed stuck in the rescues, desperate for loving homes.

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I understand your concern plan talker - but yes, this is something I have thought about for years - but never committed to doing - and always had my bitches spayed, there was never a 'right time' - Now - the kids have grown up, vets bills are not an issue - my pets health will always be paramount. She is just small for her breed - no health problems, my vet has given her a good check over and the all clear if I do choose to breed. She will be 2 in January - so I need to make a decision for next year - breed or spay. As for finding a home for the pups - obviously I would do home checks for the prospective owners that I don't know

I am not in it for the money - I would like to keep my dogs blood line going to keep a pup myself, I'm not going into this blindly - and nor am I ignorant as to what this would involve, however it's not something I know an awful lot about - which is why I'm considering this for next year (I'm still unsure - I'm scared it will harm/change my dog somehow).

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Well done for thinking about this carefully and asking for advice. It's nice to have a litter of pups with the intention of keeping one as a companion to mum.

 

I think that your first port of call should be the breed club. The Kennel Club will have details or you can google it. You should get loads of advice from them, particularly regarding any screening tests that need to be done. They will also be able to advise you about a good stud dog. With a maiden bitch you need an experienced one and an experienced handler/owner. If you can get a good rapport going with the owner they should give you advice and may even be able to help you sell the pups you don't want to keep.

 

You will need to spend quite a bit on items as follows: whelping box, puppy pen, good quality food. Also put aside money in case a Caesarian section is needed - this could go well into the hundreds of pounds. Factor in costs for any other veterinary consultations as a contingency. The Book of The Bitch is excellent so get a copy if you can.

 

It's good that she has a nice temperament - that is an excellent start and if the stud dog is even-tempered too you should get some lovely pups. The only thing that bothers me is that you say she is a small bitch. This is where I think you would be best to talk it over with an experienced breeder from one of the breed clubs. Caesarians are not only expensive but traumatic for the bitch and owner.

 

It is very hard work, time consuming and turns your house upside down as you will need to clear a room just for mum and pups. Don't be tempted to house them in the main part of the house because all the comings and goings may upset her. What they need is peace and quiet to get on with their job. The mess shouldn't be too much as they are a small breed. If you succeed, and get good homes for them it is most satisfactory.

 

Just seen your last post and no, it won't alter your bitch. If she is well nourished and cared for she will be back to normal soon after the little ones are weaned. Two years is a good age - no younger. You sound like a caring potential breeder and that is what is needed these days - too many of the other sort. Think it over carefully and good luck with whatever you decide.

Edited by ccit

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Thanks, I've got a study/snug room downstairs which I was thinking of using for her and the pups, I'm still not fully sold with the idea yet - but I need to get all he information I can to make an informed decision. I'll get a copy of that book, thank you.

 

---------- Post added 01-09-2013 at 17:10 ----------

 

I had a beautiful cavy before this one - I would have loved to have bred her, she was so nice natured, unfortunately she had dodgy eyes and a bad ticker - on heart tablets from 18 months - and operation (that didn't work) on her eyes - due to the above I couldn't possibly risk breeding her and passing on the health problems, she was only 8 when she died (heart attack). Thankfully Lily (Lhasa) is in good health.

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Yes, think about it carefully - once mated, there is no going back. It can be stressful, especially if you haven't done it before and your bitch is a much loved pet. If there is any doubt whatsoever then it would probably be best not to go ahead. To do the job properly you need to have full commitment to it.

 

I forgot to say that you need to add on the stud fee. I don't know what the going rate is for a well bred Lhasa but I would hazard a guess at circa £300. You may come out of it with a lighter pocket but then you would have you own puppy.

 

If you do decide to contact one of the breed clubs, remember that their raison d'etre is showing but don't let that put you off. They are also interested in the health and welfare of their breed and should welcome newcomers, even if they do not want to show. If someone could look at your bitch and the pedigree they would be able to compare her to the breed standard and advise you about the size issue.

 

I am sorry to hear of the loss of your Cavalier - an all too common problem in the breed. This is exactly why I referred you to the breed club. Good, knowledgable breeders are few and far between.

Edited by ccit

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My advice would be to get on eBay and get yourself a copy of "the book of the bitch" It had loads of really useful information in it. I will be breeding my bitch very soon for the first time and have had lots of helpful guidelines from that book, and also if you can find a friendly helpful breeder to talk to, as I have. Good luck :)

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I had a one off mating of my Dachshund and thoroughly enjoyed caring for her and the 4 pups, it was an expensive venture but get my line going.though they are now 5 and speyed.By the way I kept the girls:)

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Thanks, I've got a study/snug room downstairs which I was thinking of using for her and the pups, I'm still not fully sold with the idea yet - but I need to get all he information I can to make an informed decision. I'll get a copy of that book, thank you.

 

---------- Post added 01-09-2013 at 17:10 ----------

 

I had a beautiful cavy before this one - I would have loved to have bred her, she was so nice natured, unfortunately she had dodgy eyes and a bad ticker - on heart tablets from 18 months - and operation (that didn't work) on her eyes - due to the above I couldn't possibly risk breeding her and passing on the health problems, she was only 8 when she died (heart attack). Thankfully Lily (Lhasa) is in good health.

 

You could sell the pups on here as well :)

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I've got a beautiful pedigree Lhasa, she's 100% healthy (regular vet checks) and a fabulous nature. I am considering breeding her - as I would like to keep a pup from her myself. Obviously I would want an appropriate mate - with full pedigree - and I would discuss this in depth with my vet, but has anyone got any advice? I have never bred before (this will be a 1 time thing!) - how would I go about finding the right stud? (Mines small breed - therefore I would want a small breed stud). And advice would be welcomed.

Thanks

 

Don't worry about the na sayer's on here, if you know that you want a litter of pups from your bitch, then go for it. Please keep us informed of your decision, and if you are looking for potential future owner's, please put me on your list of prospective owner's. A home visit would be more than welcomed.

We have a Cavalier as well, and we love her to bits, and would welcome another little bundle of fluff into our household.!

 

jt

Edited by john t

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Sorry about this sounding like I'm a nay-sayer, but my philosophy is "Spay and neuter"... Don't breed whilst-ever there are examples of that breed stuck in the rescues, desperate for loving homes.

 

Are there many full lhasa apso's in rescues? Genuine question by the way. I'd be surprised if there were.

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Are there many full lhasa apso's in rescues? Genuine question by the way. I'd be surprised if there were.

 

There are lots of lhasa apso rescues across the UK. Also, check how many adult lhasa's there are for sale via websites such as gumtree etc.

 

they do seem to be a desirable breed at the moment, but they can have a number of health issues such as PRA, skin and eye problems. If breeding then all of these things need to be taken in to consideration.

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