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Private landlords supply accommodation which would otherwise be too expensive . And now, with the Fair Rents Act, they should be encouraged.

 

Private landlords supply accommodation which usually more expensive than buying.

 

Renting a home is now more expensive than buying – even though most would-be purchasers are unable to get on the property ladder.

 

According to new research buying a home has become £1,440 a year cheaper than renting.

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I'm not fussed about putting much effort into posts anymore, waste of time really.

 

This is no place for debate, it ain't a forum like it once was, it is an online version of the admag.

 

I for one believe you should continue. You'll have no effect if you don't persevere. some people don't seem to believe or choose not to understand when you talk of land and its ownership and how the lack of it or dis-proportional ownership is akin to slavery. They act like we live in a future utopia as slavery and 'landowners' appear to be outdated words, we don't and they aren't.

 

---------- Post added 22-06-2013 at 01:21 ----------

 

Private landlords supply accommodation which would otherwise be too expensive . And now, with the Fair Rents Act, they should be encouraged.

 

That maybe so in some cases but that doesn't mean that they don't also increase the cost of housing for non tenants. Because they do, as can bee seen in several areas of Sheffield where there is a lot of terraced housing which is bought specifically to split into student lets(5 tenants in a 3bed house) has pushed up the house prices in the streets/areas that were traditionally 'family' homes that would have been 'affordable' were it not for student lets.

Edited by syne

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German tax laws used to encourage the construction of homes with an apartment for parent(s), but AFAIK, that has been changed.

 

There is a fair bit of difference between 'low home ownership rates' (which Germany has) and 'No home ownership'. The people who live in houses with Granny flats tend to own them.

 

Having said that, the house across the road from mine has a cellar and 3 floors above it. The top floor is a holiday apartment, the cellar goes with the two floors below, which are rented by a family with children (upper floor) and the grandparents (grandma is in a wheelchair) ground floor.

 

German rental law is indeed better for tenants than that in the UK. - But it's better for landlords, too.

 

I rented a house to a man in the UK. He 'did a runner', having caused a fair bit of damage and owing me a lot of rent. The Police weren't interested (and I was told that if I went after him and 'persuaded' him to pay me, I would end up in trouble.)

 

If a tenant pulled that trick in Germany, then unless he left the country and didn't return, the State would track him down and prosecute him.

 

The prices and standards of rental housing are quite strictly controlled in Germany - but the controls work both ways.

 

I wouldn't consider renting out a house in the UK (if I couldn't monitor the rental in person) but I would have no qualms in renting out a property in Germany.

 

Yes, you remind me. When my son (and his family) was sent on a three-year detachement to Germany, he had to leave the property in to the same very-high standard it was when he moved in.

 

Now this was the sort of situation where I believe in private landlords.

 

The "Granny" flat is a superb idea because it caters for the shortage of affordable housing and security for Granny. I'm going to write to the appropriate MEP with the idea (to copy Germany). We I used to visit my son is BONN I gpt the feeling that the younger generation where turning more and more to home ownship.

 

Some landlords will ONLY rent to DHSS tenants because the rent goes straight into their bank account. The song "My old man said follow the van" was about people doing a bunk!

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Private landlords supply accommodation which would otherwise be too expensive . And now, with the Fair Rents Act, they should be encouraged.

 

Could we have some more info. on this new act, source please?

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Yes, you remind me. When my son (and his family) was sent on a three-year detachement to Germany, he had to leave the property in to the same very-high standard it was when he moved in.

 

Now this was the sort of situation where I believe in private landlords.

 

The "Granny" flat is a superb idea because it caters for the shortage of affordable housing and security for Granny. I'm going to write to the appropriate MEP with the idea (to copy Germany). We I used to visit my son is BONN I gpt the feeling that the younger generation where turning more and more to home ownship.

 

Some landlords will ONLY rent to DHSS tenants because the rent goes straight into their bank account. The song "My old man said follow the van" was about people doing a bunk!

 

German tax law used to give a significant tax-break to somebody who built a house with a 'granny flat' because everybody is obliged to pay into the Old-Age Care fund, but if Mum (or Dad) are living in an apartment with their children and grand-children, it places less of a load on the fund.

 

The tax-break has gone. - If you want a house with a granny flat, build one - but you have to pay for it.

 

There is another potential tax break. If I was to give my house to my Son while I am still alive, subject to a formal agreement that he would provide care for me (or my wife or both of us) in out old age, he would be shielded from Inheritance tax on (I think) %50% of the value of the property.

 

People in major cities are probably turning to home ownership because - in those cities - there is usually an acute shortage of rental property. Not because people don't what to rent out property, but simply because the number of people looking for property is far greater than the number of housing units. A genuine housing shortage.

 

(I saw an advert in a Munich paper this week placed by a couple looking for an apartment. They were looking for a 3-room apartment, were willing to pay £1200 a month and were willing to pay a £1000 'finder's fee'.)

 

Munich is an expensive city and it has an acute housing shortage. There is no shortage of well-paid jobs, but there is an acute shortage of places for people to live - because the population is increasing faster than building and nobody is making any more land.

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Isn't the "granny flat" a brilliant idea? Granny can sell her property and pay for an extention or alteration to somebody's house (...and not necessarily an off-spring), have security of tenure and someone to keep an eye on her. Alternative, if granny does not have the cash, her off-spring could have a grant to carry-out the work and thereby take the responsibility of granny's housing off the state.

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