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How long does it take for a crowned tooth to settle down?

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I have had a tooth crowned, privately. It looks lovely. I am still experiencing some discomfort and it will be 2 weeks tomorrow since I had it fitted. It isnt hurting all the time, but in the evenings and at bedtime I have feel a pain in my tooth which seems to go along my gum line towards my ear. I have increased sensitivity to cold around the crown too. I know it should take time to settle down, but how long?

 

I had it done at a dentist other than my own as my own dentist was closed at Christmas when I had the dental emergency. As this other dentist saw me, did a temp repair and x-rays I decided to let him do the crown. I suppose I am putting off seeing him as I cant afford any more private costs! He wont take on NHS patients. Also, I just cant take any more drilling.

 

Any guidelines as to how long it takes to settle would be appreciated.

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When I had my crown fitted, I was in pain with it, and finally went back to the dentist, who told me I had an infection.

 

Gave me a prescription for antibiotics, and it cleared up.

 

Maybe worth a trip back ~ it could be just that you need the fitting of the crown adjusted.

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Yeah, I suppose you are right. I just wanted to be sure I had given it enough time.

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Did you have root treatment first, Alyson?

I understand the fashion now is not to do root treatment if it's not thought necessary (it can make the tooth more brittle longer term).

However, I once developed an infection shortly after having a crown fitted (which I wasn't too chuffed about!) and the dentist then had to drill into the crown to do the root treatment.

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I had to have a gold crown fitted (apparently it is too small for anything else). I never had any pain at all from it. It just took me a while to get used to it.

 

I hate it by the way. Glad it's not one of my front teeth :rolleyes:

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Did you have root treatment first, Alyson?

I understand the fashion now is not to do root treatment if it's not thought necessary (it can make the tooth more brittle longer term).

However, I once developed an infection shortly after having a crown fitted (which I wasn't too chuffed about!) and the dentist then had to drill into the crown to do the root treatment.

 

Ta for making me feel better about this.... I want my Mum *rocks back and forth*..... I don't like drills unless I am using one. :D

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Are you sure that it's not catching on another tooth, eg top crown slightly touching bottom tooth, it happened to me and like you I thought it would settle,it eventually made the crown loose so it want seeing to, it doesn't hurt at all.

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When a crown is prepared on a living tooth we do have to drill it to the right shape. Teeth dont like being drilled and its not unusual for a freshly crowned tooth to be a bit sensitive for days or even weeks. As long as it seems to be gradually improving its worth just giving it more time.

 

However, if it seems to be getting worse as time goes on its worth returning to your dentist. Sadly teeth can sometimes die off following crowns, or even just large fillings and then they may need more drastic treatment such as a root filling ( as happened to angle20 ) or even an extraction :(

 

Agree with Applegrim, if you suspect the crown is slightly high you should return for adjustment. Do all your other teeth feel like they meet together the same way they did before the crown was fitted? If they dont its high.

 

We dont routinely Root Fill teeth just because we want to put a crown on. Root fillings are about the most unreliable form of dental treatment with a 20 percent or worse failure rate.

 

Robin.

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