Jump to content
Fancy running a forum? Sheffield Forum is for sale! Learn more

Sheffieldish - words & phrases

Recommended Posts

just been hit in chops, ie in the mouth :o

 

Well done raymondo for getting your "noggin" around this thread.

 

= well done raymondo for getting your "head" around this thread.

 

eg "understanding"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nowt to do with the festivities earlier in the month, but I've recently been reminded of the term "KALIED". ie for them as don't twig it, Southerners and such, a euphemism for having supped too much lotion, tiddly, p....d, etc. Argument, gentle discussion, followed about its origin. My thoughts are that it came from "kali powder", that sherbet thing that kids sucked up with a liquorice straw from a paper packet about the size of a tea bag..... well before ingesting other white powder became fashionable. And this white powder could be made into a fizzy drink, hence the association with strong ale.

 

Any other ideas ???????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my mum used to shout at him, my dad said she sounded like a "common vardyke". Nobody seems to know this word - any clues? Also told her to "get down Dixon Lane" where the market used to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think this has been mentioned before, i sow it on S/F not so long ago

 

togger = football

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My folks were from Attercliffe right back to when it was farm land. Memory fades, but:

 

'Dancers' meant stairs, something to do with Fred Astaire always dancing on them (or the name?), so "Gerrup them dancers", 'Twirls' were keys, and 'Mad eye' meant a nutter, someone tearing past in a car would provoke "Ay ay, mad-eye!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember 'mad-eye' being used by my parents in exactly the same context as your example but I thought they were saying 'madite'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I dont think this has been mentioned before, i sow it on S/F not so long ago

 

togger = football

Oh my god! you've re-awoken a long-dormant neuron in my brain. Yes, I remember saying "togger"! That's an essent word!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I remember togger, also grid for bicycle, mabs for marbles, causey edge for kerb, bread and scrape for an insubstantial snack. My dad, who was brought up in Wincobank had numerous odd expressions but I suspect he had made up most of them himself.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone (like me) used to go to the chippy and ask for "scraps"? This was basically loose bits of fried batter. What a scrounger I was!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I was into scraps. We always knew black pudding as black dag. Potted meat (not seen it since I left Sheffield) was known as potted dog. Sliced potatoes dipped in batter and fried were scallops. Rice pudding was Chinese wedding cake. There was a pub built into the old Corn Exchange before it was demolished, known as T' Manche, I think it was really called The Norfolk Arms or something like that. It was frequented by workers from the fruit and veg market. At school, Nether Edge Grammar we played a playground game known to us as "Finger, Thumb and Rusty Bum" a sort of an adaptation of leap frog.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bottled it....... lost his nerve...

Trousers at half mast.......Showing too much sock ..

And wasn't there some thing about a rag mans trumpet ?.......:o

Edited by grinder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.