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President Hugo Chaves loses his battle with cancer.


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The closure of Don Valley Stadium has a bitter irony. It was in the National Stadium in Santiago, Chile, that Augusto Pinochet's CIA backed regime imprisoned, tortured and murdered ordinary people. This marked the beginning of the neoliberal project to which, in a much more prosaic manner, Sheffiled is losing its own stadium.

 

On the day when the world is coming to terms with the death of Venezuela's 'controversial' President, Hugo Chaves – controversial because he resisted US corporate interests and diverted his country's oil wealth to relieving the poverty of the Venesuelan people – it is important to see through the spin that the mainstream media will place upon the event.

 

When jets attacked those buildings on 9/11, that is 11 September 1973, in Santiago, US foreign policy was bringing 'discipline' to a South American democracy that sought moderate social reform. Milton Friedman helped Pinochet to create a neoliberal economy, and thousands were tortured, raped and murdedred by a western backed dictatorship. Friedman called his theory 'Shock Treatment'. Now there are billionaires living just a few kilometers from the vast shanty towns and garbage heaps that are home to Chile's dispossessed poor.

 

We are told that austerity cuts must happen here in Sheffield. But we must not forget that this austerity is taking place because the financial institutions in London and New York wrecked the economy. And just like in South America, the ordinary people are paying the price while those corporation CEOs continue to enjoy salary and bonus bonanzas. This is just another manifestation of neoliberal 'Shock Doctrine'.

 

We are not yet being tortured or murdered here in Britain so that the corporate sector can continue to enjoy big profits, but let us mourn those hundreds of thousands in South America who 'disappeared', who lost their lives, or who are haunted by their encounter with the world's superpower. And let us pause to pay tribute to President Hugo Chaves.

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The closure of Don Valley Stadium has a bitter irony. It was in the National Stadium in Santiago, Chile, that Augusto Pinochet's CIA backed regime imprisoned, tortured and murdered ordinary people. This marked the beginning of the neoliberal project to which, in a much more prosaic manner, Sheffiled is losing its own stadium.

 

On the day when the world is coming to terms with the death of Venezuela's 'controversial' President, Hugo Chaves – controversial because he resisted US corporate interests and diverted his country's oil wealth to relieving the poverty of the Venesuelan people – it is important to see through the spin that the mainstream media will place upon the event.

 

When jets attacked those buildings on 9/11, that is 11 September 1973, in Santiago, US foreign policy was bringing 'discipline' to a South American democracy that sought moderate social reform. Milton Friedman helped Pinochet to create a neoliberal economy, and thousands were tortured, raped and murdedred by a western backed dictatorship. Friedman called his theory 'Shock Treatment'. Now there are billionaires living just a few kilometers from the vast shanty towns and garbage heaps that are home to Chile's dispossessed poor.

 

We are told that austerity cuts must happen here in Sheffield. But we must not forget that this austerity is taking place because the financial institutions in London and New York wrecked the economy. And just like in South America, the ordinary people are paying the price while those corporation CEOs continue to enjoy salary and bonus bonanzas. This is just another manifestation of neoliberal 'Shock Doctrine'.

 

We are not yet being tortured or murdered here in Britain so that the corporate sector can continue to enjoy big profits, but let us mourn those hundreds of thousands in South America who 'disappeared', who lost their lives, or who are haunted by their encounter with the world's superpower. And let us pause to pay tribute to President Hugo Chaves.

 

Interesting points you raise about the relationship between Pinochet and the 'shock treatment' of neo liberalism.

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The closure of Don Valley Stadium has a bitter irony. It was in the National Stadium in Santiago, Chile, that Augusto Pinochet's CIA backed regime imprisoned, tortured and murdered ordinary people. This marked the beginning of the neoliberal project to which, in a much more prosaic manner, Sheffiled is losing its own stadium.

 

On the day when the world is coming to terms with the death of Venezuela's 'controversial' President, Hugo Chaves – controversial because he resisted US corporate interests and diverted his country's oil wealth to relieving the poverty of the Venesuelan people – it is important to see through the spin that the mainstream media will place upon the event.

 

When jets attacked those buildings on 9/11, that is 11 September 1973, in Santiago, US foreign policy was bringing 'discipline' to a South American democracy that sought moderate social reform. Milton Friedman helped Pinochet to create a neoliberal economy, and thousands were tortured, raped and murdedred by a western backed dictatorship. Friedman called his theory 'Shock Treatment'. Now there are billionaires living just a few kilometers from the vast shanty towns and garbage heaps that are home to Chile's dispossessed poor.

 

We are told that austerity cuts must happen here in Sheffield. But we must not forget that this austerity is taking place because the financial institutions in London and New York wrecked the economy. And just like in South America, the ordinary people are paying the price while those corporation CEOs continue to enjoy salary and bonus bonanzas. This is just another manifestation of neoliberal 'Shock Doctrine'.

 

We are not yet being tortured or murdered here in Britain so that the corporate sector can continue to enjoy big profits, but let us mourn those hundreds of thousands in South America who 'disappeared', who lost their lives, or who are haunted by their encounter with the world's superpower. And let us pause to pay tribute to President Hugo Chaves.

 

Sheffield's economy was affected long ago by the loss of the steel industry to countries who could manufacture it just as well and with much cheaper labour.

The fact that Sheffield leaders have not apparently managed to attract alternative industries to replace steel or much outside investment for that matter over the past 2-3 decades just goes to show that the fault lies with Sheffield leaders.

Nothing to do with Wall street and/ or New york

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Sheffield's economy was affected long ago by the loss of the steel industry to countries who could manufacture it just as well and with much cheaper labour.

The fact that Sheffield leaders have not apparently managed to attract alternative industries to replace steel or much outside investment for that matter over the past 2-3 decades just goes to show that the fault lies with Sheffield leaders.

Nothing to do with Wall street and/ or New york

 

Sadly it is no coincidence that we see 2 or 3 decades of decline. It was Mrs Thatcher, whom it must be remembered, enjoyed afternoon tea with Mr Pinochet, who ushered in neoliberal policies here in Britain in the 1980s. Under neoliberal practice, business stops being about making things like steel, and becomes about making money. And corporate leaders do that by shipping plant and technology abroad to exploit cheap labour and deregulated 'enterprise zones'. And industrial centres like Sheffield, Liverpool, Pittsburg or Detroit become casualty to this logic - transformed into centres of unemployment and decay.

 

Mr Chaves sought to transform his country by investing Venesuela's oil revenue in jobs, education, health and services for the people rather than allowing the multinationals to do what they do best - make big profits for themselves.

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I could have partied all night!!! If it wasnt for a rotten hard final day at my part time work and shedloads of other things to catch up with...

 

I resent it when Hugo Chavez is described as a 'socialist'. He was NOTHING OF THE SORT. Someone who falls in so brazenly to bed with the likes of VLADIMIR PUTIN, THE IRANIAN LEADERSHIP and the Pope, conservative homophobes all, had far more in common with ADOLF HITLER and the TRUE Socialists of the moment are heroes like Barack Obama, the first black president of the USA, Nelson Mandela, Peter Tatchell, or the Dalai Lama, and too many numerous other people to be mentioned here.

 

If you doubt the reasons for Chavez to be described by among others, the Chinese as the 'New Hitler' in spite of having squandered so much money on 'social' spending (on everything from an eccentric cablecar system to propping up other ailing fascist regimes) I can point to the fact that the Nazis spent a great deal on infrastructure and facilities to improve living conditions for ordinary workers... as long as they were Aryans!

 

 

See: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&sqi=2&ved=0CD4QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwnlibrary.com%2FPortabel%2520Documents%2FH%2FHitler%2FHitler%2520Youth%25201922-1945%2520-%2520An%2520Illustrated%2520History.pdf&ei=0Yo3UeCDJo_K0AWjwIC4CA&usg=AFQjCNFL4CragZqiC_RemIQmQsSBZwGUSw&sig2=DCVCtsYmKV_gSFsYTvr5pg&bvm=bv.43287494,d.d2k&cad=rja

 

Or: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1381124/Mein-summer-camp-How-Adolf-Hitler-wanted-Nazi-Butlins-style-holiday-resorts.html info about the incredible holiday resort town at Rugen on the Baltic.:gag::gag:

 

for examples.

 

---------- Post added 06-03-2013 at 18:40 ----------

 

See also: http://sanityinjection.wordpress.com/2009/02/09/venezuela-nazi-germany-chavezhitler/

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'Battle with cancer'? No, he simply died of cancer.

We all have to die, you know, even a famous or infamous politician or dictator.

 

An interesting point.People don't lose their battle with heart disease or any other condition.The phrase makes me think the dead person just didn't try hard enough.

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The closure of Don Valley Stadium has a bitter irony. It was in the National Stadium in Santiago, Chile, that Augusto Pinochet's CIA backed regime imprisoned, tortured and murdered ordinary people. This marked the beginning of the neoliberal project to which, in a much more prosaic manner, Sheffiled is losing its own stadium.

 

On the day when the world is coming to terms with the death of Venezuela's 'controversial' President, Hugo Chaves – controversial because he resisted US corporate interests and diverted his country's oil wealth to relieving the poverty of the Venesuelan people – it is important to see through the spin that the mainstream media will place upon the event.

 

When jets attacked those buildings on 9/11, that is 11 September 1973, in Santiago, US foreign policy was bringing 'discipline' to a South American democracy that sought moderate social reform. Milton Friedman helped Pinochet to create a neoliberal economy, and thousands were tortured, raped and murdedred by a western backed dictatorship. Friedman called his theory 'Shock Treatment'. Now there are billionaires living just a few kilometers from the vast shanty towns and garbage heaps that are home to Chile's dispossessed poor.

 

We are told that austerity cuts must happen here in Sheffield. But we must not forget that this austerity is taking place because the financial institutions in London and New York wrecked the economy. And just like in South America, the ordinary people are paying the price while those corporation CEOs continue to enjoy salary and bonus bonanzas. This is just another manifestation of neoliberal 'Shock Doctrine'.

 

We are not yet being tortured or murdered here in Britain so that the corporate sector can continue to enjoy big profits, but let us mourn those hundreds of thousands in South America who 'disappeared', who lost their lives, or who are haunted by their encounter with the world's superpower. And let us pause to pay tribute to President Hugo Chaves.

 

He was just another vain, power-hungry politician despite all the grandstanding, as far as I can see. My enemy's enemy is not always my friend, I find. Amnesty International had a few things to say about his misuse of power. Just as well he's dead, as with pretty much any politician.

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Dear Tyranna

 

Your words seem to suggest that you have lost your job. If that is so then it is news that I am very sorry to hear.

 

Regarding your comments about President Chaves, I would agree that he is a complex and conflicted character, and no doubt there will be much analysis and commentary on his contribution to politics in the Americas in the coming weeks.

 

Nevertheless, please do make room for some merit. After all he was standing against a mighty and merciless aggressor, the Neocon architects of the Washington Consensus.

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