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Ordinary people should know their place!


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The work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith has publicly attacked those 'who think they're too good' to stack supermarket shelves on the coalition's unpaid 'back to work' scheme. Criticising a graduate who has successfully challenged the policy, and suggesting that people with a degree should recognise the value of unskilled supermarket work, Mr Duncan Smith entirely refuses to recognise that it is the unpaid nature of the scheme that is generating opposition to the policy.

 

Mrs Thatcher urged that Britain might become a nation of shopkeepers. However, Mr Duncan Smith seems to desire that we should content ourselves with being a country of shelf stackers. What he fails to acknowledge is that these roles are poorly paid, highly pressured, prone to conditions characterised by harsh and bullying supervision, and unlikely to lead to opportunities for career advancement.

 

Supermarkets are in the business of exploiting the labour they need to sell products to the public. And their marketing strategies love to highlight how competitive they are on our behalf. However, these multiple retailers are not so forthcoming when it comes to issues such as paying their taxes, structuring family friendly working patterns or paying fair remuneration to their employees. It cannot have gone un noticed that they are investing in new technologies to facilitate a reduction in the need to employ people, increasingly replacing checkout personnel with self-service tills. Supermarkets are in business to deliver profits to their shareholders by undercutting local shops, shedding staff and offshoring profits, not to offer employment and opportunity to ordinary people or to enhance local economies.

 

Mr Duncan Smith is simultaneously sneering towards those from ordinary backgrounds who seek to enjoy higher education, and cynically characterises the function of university as a purely vocational process rather than celebrating its inherent value as a valid and enriching rite of passage. This, he prefers to imply, is a privilege for the few, for the children of well placed families to enjoy. Behind Mr Duncan Smith's words there is a 'know your place' exhortation.

 

University should be the place for all who wish to do so to seek an advanced education, a place where students are introduced to complex ideas, where assumptions are challenged, and an arena in which independent thinking is encouraged. But the coalition has transformed higher education into a business, and in the process they have made it more inaccessible to ordinary people.

 

If we wish to enjoy a thriving economy, then local shops, small and medium enterprise, and job creation, rather than multinational corporations and multiple retailers, must be at the heart of public policy, and education for all should be a basic aspiration.

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He is referring to the young woman who refused to work unpaid in Poundland.

 

However she did not refuse to work there because she thought it was beneath her, (indeed she has since worked in a supermarket,) but because she already had an unpaid job in a museum more in keeping with her university specialism of geology, and she hoped with prospects of becoming a proper job.

 

Once again IDS is just trying to stir up the plebs to turn on each other by not giving the whole story.

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The accusation that those who object to working for large companies for free (instead of employing people on at least the minimum wage) are somehow "job snobs" is contemptable.

 

The true “job snobs” are actually all the Graylings and Duncan Smiths of this country who, in their warped Tory mind, obviously think that those jobs are so **** that they don’t even deserve to be paid at NMW rates.

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The work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith has publicly attacked those 'who think they're too good' to stack supermarket shelves on the coalition's unpaid 'back to work' scheme.

 

I think you're being a tad disingenuous here.

 

Here's the full story

 

Iain Duncan Smith attacks graduates who claim they are 'too good to stack shelves'

 

 

Mrs Thatcher urged that Britain might become a nation of shopkeepers.

 

You're confusing Mrs. T. with Adam Smith.

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Make no mistake about it. The ruling class tory snobs would re-introduce workhouses if the population allowed them to. We must kick back hard.

 

This is the start of the return to the workhouse.

 

At least in the workhouse, you could look forward to some beef bone stew, got nay chance of that with this lot.

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Simple thing to do is to tell IDS to do his job 30 hours a week for no more than what a typical JSA claimant gets. He's allowed no other income such as expenses and must not use any government vehicles/perks.

 

Let him try to survive a month.

Edited by Resident
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