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The nanny state again


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Speaking with an accent doesn't equate to a lack of education.

The number of highly educated northerners I've known who still pronounce "one" as 'wan' amongst other words, in spite of having lived down south for most of their adult lives.

I never mentioned the Govt in my post......a headteacher is part of the state (state education)?.

When I said condescending rubbish I was referring to the attitude of the interviewer who was trying to make the interviewee look thick!

 

But you gave the thread the title "nanny state"..this usually means the government..

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Speaking with an accent doesn't equate to a lack of education.

The number of highly educated northerners I've known who still pronounce "one" as 'wan' amongst other words, in spite of having lived down south for most of their adult lives.

I never mentioned the Govt in my post......a headteacher is part of the state (state education)?.

When I said condescending rubbish I was referring to the attitude of the interviewer who was trying to make the interviewee look thick!

 

Nanny state is a term of British origin (and primary use) that conveys a view that a government or its policies are overprotective or interfering unduly with personal choice.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanny_state

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Nanny state is a term of British origin (and primary use) that conveys a view that a government or its policies are overprotective or interfering unduly with personal choice.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanny_state

 

Coined by toffs who had nannies,to deny help to others that did n't have one.Funnily enough paternalism was the prerogative of the Tories but the neo-Liberals have ditched any real links with the less privileged.

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Nanny state is a term of British origin (and primary use) that conveys a view that a government or its policies are overprotective or interfering unduly with personal choice.

 

The bankers weren't complaning when the nanny state bailed them out after their gambling spree.

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I think it is a good thing what the headmistress is trying to do.

There is nothing wrong with regional accents, but talking in a regional accent has nothing to do with speaking correctly. You can still speak correctly with an accent. The headmistress is trying to stop children using slang words. I'm not posh but I do it with my grandchildren. :)

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I think it is a good thing what the headmistress is trying to do.

There is nothing wrong with regional accents, but talking in a regional accent has nothing to do with speaking correctly. You can still speak correctly with an accent. The headmistress is trying to stop children using slang words. I'm not posh but I do it with my grandchildren. :)

 

There's nothing wrong with being posh-no-one can determine their family background retrospectively.All accents are regional even posh 'uns

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I agree too.

 

If there is 'nothing wrong' with regional dialects and accents, why do you distinguish between them, and speaking 'correctly'?

 

Perhaps it would be more helpful to use the correct linguistic terminology (rather than subjective value judgments!) when discussing language use, i.e refer to 'standard' or 'non-standard' English.

 

There are some situations in which one of of the above is more appropriate than the other and other contexts it is less so. Context is all!

Edited by aliceBB
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If one of the aims of education is to make the pupil more employable then teaching them how to speak grammatically must be up there with teaching them other skills such as languages and mathematics, surely?

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