Jump to content

Did you work at Abrose Shardlow’s?


peterw

Recommended Posts

I worked at Shardlows

for 34 yrs from 1978 until 2012. 

I recognise a lot of the names mentioned in the chat and have fond memories of my time there up until the Italians took over in the early part of the new millenium.  It was hard work for much of the time I spent there on the Capstan Lathes in 13 bay and on Grinding section but there was always a great sense of comradery with each other that made it a special place.  My Grandad, Roland Kenworthy, worked there for 40 years ending up as a Tool Room chargehand.  He retired in 1975.

There were always some good characters at Shardlows and some of the things we got up to over the years were so funny.  Some of the characters are still there, such as Little Johnny Turner, Mad Dog Darren Hawksworth, Wayne Latham and Willie Carson.  Does anyone remember Pele, Russ the Fish, Maltby Mauler,  Andy Poulton, Moggy , Mark Gregory, Big Jess. There were loads more Superstars to name. These people were legends and alcoholics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 28/10/2008 at 15:03, PopT said:

Does anyone remember Clive Wiggett?

 

Happy Days! PopT

Clive and Anita were our neighbours in Deepcar from 1968 to 1977 until my parents moved to South Wales and I moved to Sheffield. My parents kept in touch with them until my parents deaths in 2013/14. I know Anita had a "shop" (picture framing?) on the Lanes at Meadowhall in the early days and one on Commonside, and their kids, Mathew and Nina both visited my folks down in S Wales.

As someone has said, they moved to Bamford - late '80's?

 

Clive was a big Wednesdayite and keen golfer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
On 04/07/2011 at 23:45, Planner Paul said:

I worked at Shardlows from 1973 to 1980 - served my apprenticeship on the shop floor then becoming a Planning Engineer, and have great memories. Part of my time was spent in the Tool Room working with Alan Tunnicliffe, and in the heavy shop working with Clive Wiggett (nice guy). Best memories were having the best Training Instructors (Harry Senior and Fred Jenkinson), and other apprentices at the time (Paul Bush, Glen Turner and others)

Oh hi. 

It's so nice to read through this & see my dad's name (Paul Bush). He's still there... Retiring in 2 weeks. I'm looking for work mates past & present to send me a written/video message so I can put something together for him. 

 

Edited by Gem
Want to turn on notifications
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 21/07/2013 at 19:25, TBTDrill758 said:

Greetings all!

Would just like to ask if anyone remembers Frank McWatt? He was my first training officer when I started there from school in 1979, before I was unceremoniously dumped along with 219 of my colleagues in 2009! My son is doing his thesis at University on the Spitfire & Hurricane aircraft & any information regarding the Merlin Crankshafts or Frank McWatt (former RAF I believe) that you may have among you would be greatly appreciated! I worked in the M/C shop mostly, with the occasional trip to the Prep Shop & Heavy Shop (if I was lucky)! Thanks! Andy Rodgers!!!

Hi Andy

 

You may have worked with my dad. Paul Bush? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 16/09/2021 at 22:39, Glyn F said:

I worked at Shardlows

for 34 yrs from 1978 until 2012. 

I recognise a lot of the names mentioned in the chat and have fond memories of my time there up until the Italians took over in the early part of the new millenium.  It was hard work for much of the time I spent there on the Capstan Lathes in 13 bay and on Grinding section but there was always a great sense of comradery with each other that made it a special place.  My Grandad, Roland Kenworthy, worked there for 40 years ending up as a Tool Room chargehand.  He retired in 1975.

There were always some good characters at Shardlows and some of the things we got up to over the years were so funny.  Some of the characters are still there, such as Little Johnny Turner, Mad Dog Darren Hawksworth, Wayne Latham and Willie Carson.  Does anyone remember Pele, Russ the Fish, Maltby Mauler,  Andy Poulton, Moggy , Mark Gregory, Big Jess. There were loads more Superstars to name. These people were legends and alcoholics.

Hi Glyn, 

 

Do you remember my dad? Paul Bush? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My stepfather-in-law Billie Johnston worked there from about 1960 until his retirement in about 1985. He was a skilled turner who served his apprenticeship in Harland and Wolff  in Belfast during the war. He lived on Wordsworth Avenue and was a regular at The Greyhound in Ecclesfield as well as Lane Top WMC.  His language included a terminology peculiar to Shardlows, "duckboards" "fourthrows" and a couple of words I can't recall that referred to the sharp pieces of metal that got under the skin of his hands and the large containers that stood by the lathes for scrap.     I recall being shocked by the rule of law that was imposed by shop stewards on matters of job pricing and piece work.  Millions of people who drive cars, ride in buses or receive their goods from lorries could never imagine the sheer sweat, toil and determination of the people who worked there to give them the benefits of modern transport. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...
  • 3 weeks later...
On 24/11/2021 at 20:34, DavidFrance said:

My stepfather-in-law Billie Johnston worked there from about 1960 until his retirement in about 1985. He was a skilled turner who served his apprenticeship in Harland and Wolff  in Belfast during the war. He lived on Wordsworth Avenue and was a regular at The Greyhound in Ecclesfield as well as Lane Top WMC.  His language included a terminology peculiar to Shardlows, "duckboards" "fourthrows" and a couple of words I can't recall that referred to the sharp pieces of metal that got under the skin of his hands and the large containers that stood by the lathes for scrap.     I recall being shocked by the rule of law that was imposed by shop stewards on matters of job pricing and piece work.  Millions of people who drive cars, ride in buses or receive their goods from lorries could never imagine the sheer sweat, toil and determination of the people who worked there to give them the benefits of modern transport. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.