Jump to content

Things that you just don't see now!

Recommended Posts

GOT THIS VIA E-MAIL TODAY.

 

Aprons

 

 

I don't think our kids know what an apron is.

 

 

The principal use of grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath, but along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

 

 

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears.

 

 

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming oven.

 

 

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.

 

 

And when the weather was cold, grandma wrapped it around her arms.

 

 

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.

 

 

Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.

 

 

From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables. After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

 

 

In the fall, the apron was used to bring in apples

 

That had fallen from the trees.

 

 

When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron could dust in a matter of seconds.

 

 

When dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the porch, waved her apron, and the men knew it was time to come in from the fields to dinner.

 

 

It will be a long time before someone invents something that will replace that "old-time apron" that served so many purposes.

 

 

Send this to those who would know, and love the story about Grandma's aprons.

 

 

REMEMBER

 

 

Grandma used to set her hot baked apple pies on the window sill to cool.

 

 

Her granddaughters set theirs on the window sill to thaw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do'nt know if this is the right thread for this observation. You do'nt see the stainless steel door in the cathedral anymore. I'm sure I'm not dreaming , I was a choirboy in 1943 , I remember towards the war's end there was some new extension being built & the door was donated by local steel makers.A couple of years ago I visited the cathedral for old times sake- No door & no one seemed to know about it. Someone please help to convince me I'm not going barmy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I do'nt know if this is the right thread for this observation. You do'nt see the stainless steel door in the cathedral anymore. I'm sure I'm not dreaming , I was a choirboy in 1943 , I remember towards the war's end there was some new extension being built & the door was donated by local steel makers.A couple of years ago I visited the cathedral for old times sake- No door & no one seemed to know about it. Someone please help to convince me I'm not going barmy.

 

Just across the road the doors to Cutlers Hall were stainless Steel.

Maybe that's where the confusion lies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Daily Mirror ripped up into squares and stuck on a nail behind the lavi door.

 

 

What ??? I'm scared of you.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First day at school ..1951 ,we were given cod liver oil pills to swallow with our milk..2nd day there were millions of em behind the class radiators..do they still give those to kids ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you can still use Izal toilet paper at the toilets at the bottom of the Moor!

 

GORDON BENNET!!!!

 

That would be like wiping your a*** on 80 grade emery cloth. :huh::nono::shakes::gag:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not like I'm looking for them, but as it's that time of year, Standard, Lion, or Brocks fireworks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It occured to me this morning that you don't see those big hair dryers any longer. The ones that used to be in every hairdresser where ladies would sit reading a magazine waiting for their hair dye to set.

 

Have they been completely ousted by the hand hair dryer ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I certainly do remember Glitter Wax. It was sold in my parents Post Office, and there were several displays of artificial flowers in vases around the shop and in the home made of the stuff. It could easily be made into leaves and petals and thus into much larger flowers and plants. We were always discouraged from chewing it but the aroma was something else, eventually taking on the scent of sweaty, mucky fingers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Talking of Moth balls i only got some a couple of weeks ago in whitby,i got them to put on my garden to stop the cats from doing there buisness on my garden, i put them on top of the soil they worked a treat, wished i'd picked up more than one box though:loopy:

 

Did you ever put a few moth balls in a jam jar containing some vinegar and a teaspoonful of bicarb of soda. The moth ball submarines would rise and fall all day long.:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.