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Things that you just don't see now!

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Sophie

 

All of teh memories I am recalling here happened before 1961 - ish. National Service ended then so there were no more 16 year olds (or was it 18?) joining the forces.

 

Family Favourites was a Sunday Lunchtime Radio program hosted by a guy called Cliff Michelmore and his wife, Jean Metcalfe - it was a way that the service men over seas could send messages back to their families and get records played for them - when National service ended, the show carried on but gradually lost its importance.

 

Before she was PM Maggie was Minister for Education - at some point in her career, but I dont know when she stopped free school milk.

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desy

 

Inner Circular - alternative disembarking procedure

 

When you jumped of the Circular Bus 8/9, you were almost jumping into our front door - it got so that I did it all the time - worried my Mum sick if she were serving in the shop and saw me doing it.

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What about White dog sh*t, Where's all that gone? Women taking the weekly wash down to the bendix in the pram. Kid's from the working mens club's, on the platform at Victoria station exitedly waiting for the train to Cleethorpes.

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marbles,whip and tops,five stones and fixed wheel bikes, sally army band on sunday mornings,the bloke with the basket selling sea food in the pub,nibbets, knife sharpeners, the bloke with the turban and suit case selling shirts etc on the weekly,hand warmers made from bean tins and hot coals,trollies made from pram wheels,coppers on push bikes,whitsuntide parades,post men in caps and uniform, conductors with ticket punching machines,police boxes,the little rubber tubes of petrol for filling your lighter,big waggon wheels for 3d, men wearing suits on a sunday,flat caps,and whippet racing on the parkway woodlands, and park keepers

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Does anybody remember staggered hours in many factories? I don't know when it started but it finished, I think, in 1952-53.

 

For all those too young to remember (probably anybody under 65), here is how it worked:

 

After the war, there was critical shortage of electrical power ( The government had a complete department then called the Ministry of Fuel and Power). They initiated a program that ran each year for the five winter months. This only applied to manufacturing works, not to businesses such as shops.

 

On four days each week, you would start at, say 7am until 4:30pm but on the fifth day you would not start until 12 noon and work on into the evening. Next month, your late-start day would be different, so that at the end of the winter everybody had been given the wonderful opportunity of working until 9:30 or 10 on Friday nights. Terrific!!

 

The big steel companies, such as English Steel or Firth-Brown, who bought there power directly from the CEGB (Central Electricty Generating Board) were not included in the staggered hours program.

 

All a long time ago.

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Penny Tray

 

Lucky Bags

 

Stretch (with knife or coins)

 

OXO flavoured Crisps

 

Christmas parties at school

 

Fishermen waiting to go to Boston,Fosdyke etc. by coach on sunday mornings.

 

Splits from the chippy, peas/chips for a tanner 6d

 

Bathing in front of the fire.

 

listening to Radio Luxenburg(Dan Dare piloy of the future)

 

Comics,Tiger,Lion,Wizard,Eagle

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Penny Tray

 

Christmas parties at school

 

 

Took your own plate and cup etc with your name stuck on the bottom

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Milk machines (came in cartons you never could open)

 

Choc Ice machines

 

Smell of Hops from Sheaf Brewery

 

Girls throwing and catching two balls against a wall

 

Sweet tobbaco

 

Sweet cigarettes

 

Bloody huge boxes of chocolates at Christmas for men to buy for wives/girlfriends (valentines not as big back then as it is now)

 

'Throwing' arrows (those who did it will know what they are)

 

Smell of hospitals/clinics

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After the war was over, people started celebrating as they didn't have to run to the air raid shelters anymore & life started getting back to normal, that was the cammaraderie in Sheffield around 1946.

I remember when things were on ration and you had to take the ration book to the shops when making a purchase, Sheffield copped the bombs because of the steelworks etc and there were ruins everywhere, Sheffield was the hub of England in those days.

Street parties where everyone was friendly, just lucky to have survived such destruction, such things make one appreciate life a lot more, I think it was because of the closeness of people in those days that they resented people from the outside coming in, where were the buggers when we needed them was the responce from the people, & many older people still think that way because of what they went through.

After the war there were many people homeless, hence the Petre St huts & later prefabs, but people were just thankful to be alive and they shared, many people would be turning in their graves if they could see the way a lot of the youth are turning out today with murders, rapes & destruction etc.

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Things you don’t see now! I’m intrigued by the cowboy outifit. When I was younger my dad asked me what I wanted for my birthday and I told him I wanted a cowboy outfit so he bought me Sheffield Corporation! (laugh now)

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Replying to Greybeard, I’m getting old with you owd lad! I can remember trams when the the front and rear on the upper decks were open to the weather! And both you and i will probably remember when the transport department built (or perhaps repaired) their own tram bodies. When you travelled on a tram in those days the wood used to creak! Lovely sound. You don’t hear it today. Here in Manchester — I’ve lived here since 1951 — the thing I miss the most is New Year’s Eve when the ships in Manchester Docks used to blow their horns at midnight. What a beautiful cacophony of sound that was! Don’t hear it now because there aren’t any ships docking close enough to the city centre. Coming back to Sheffield, you forgot to mention that the lift from The Wicker up to the LNER station was always known as the shortest penny ride in Sheffield

To docmel — I don’t know why you call I.T. a young un’s industry. I’m still working hard with three Macintosh G5’s, InDesign, QuarKPress, Illustrator, Photoshop, GoLive, Dreamweaver and Flash. We do quite a lot of work for Motown Music which is owned by Universal. Mind you, I have to admit I’m okay with the software — I’ve been using it since Day One — but when it comes to the inside of a computer I’m completely baffled. It’s pobably my age. Very difficult to teach an old dog new tricks!

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Replying to Greybeard, I’m getting old with you owd lad! I can remember trams when the the front and rear on the upper decks were open to the weather! And both you and i will probably remember when the transport department built (or perhaps repaired) their own tram bodies. When you travelled on a tram in those days the wood used to creak! Lovely sound.

 

I think you're a little ahead of me Peter :) - the first ride on a tram I remember would be about 1944. I got my hand wedged in the slats on those wooden seats. We were only going from Highfields to Abbeydale Cinema, but by the time the conductor found some soap from somewhere and got my hand free we were at Beauchief. Expect I got a clip round the ear for that :P

 

Think the open-ended trams were all glazed in before the war ?? When about ten me and my pal used to go to the tram sheds on Shoreham steet in the holidays hoping to see them lift the bodies off the bogies.

 

And I would also be about ten when they replaced all the points by the Royal Hotel, it took weeks to finish the work and some of us kids used to take potatoes to roast on the night-watchman's brazier in the evenings. Kids and old people used to get on pretty well in those days ;)

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