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Can a Fly Stop a Bus?


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A fly is flying along minding its own business when, from the opposite direction, comes a bus. The fly collides with the bus' windscreen. The fly sticks to the bus' windscreen and is then carried along by the bus.

 

My question is:

Did the fly stop the bus? The fly was flying towards the bus then, after hitting the windscreen, was moving in the opposite direction from which it came. During the reversal of direction process there must have been a point, however small, when the fly was stationary. As, at this juncture, the fly was stuck to the bus' windscreen, it follows that the bus was also stationary. Ergo: The fly stopped the bus!

 

Warped logic or true?

Edited by rodnreeluk
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A fly is flying along minding its own business when, from the opposite direction, comes a bus. The fly collides with the bus' windscreen. The fly sticks to the bus' windscreen and is then carried along by the bus.

 

My question is:

Did the fly stop the bus? The fly was flying towards the bus then, after hitting the windscreen, was moving in the opposite direction from which it came. During the reversal of direction process there must have been a point, however small, when the fly was stationery. As, at this juncture, the fly was stuck to the bus' windscreen, it follows that the bus was also stationery. Ergo: The fly stopped the bus!

 

Warped logic or true?

What makes you think the bus was stationary in that moment?

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When reversing direction in a straight line there must come a point when you are stationary (ie going neither one way nor the other).

 

How long does this point last?

If, by that point, you mean like a freezeframe of the sequence of events, not a measurable period of time, then you might as well ask "did the fly stop the whole universe for that moment?"

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A fly is flying along minding its own business when, from the opposite direction, comes a bus. The fly collides with the bus' windscreen. The fly sticks to the bus' windscreen and is then carried along by the bus.

 

My question is:

Did the fly stop the bus? The fly was flying towards the bus then, after hitting the windscreen, was moving in the opposite direction from which it came. During the reversal of direction process there must have been a point, however small, when the fly was stationary. As, at this juncture, the fly was stuck to the bus' windscreen, it follows that the bus was also stationary. Ergo: The fly stopped the bus!

 

Warped logic or true?

 

The Fly didn’t stop, there would have been a point when part of the fly was going forwards and another part of the fly was going in the direction of the bus, this is why it splattered.

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When reversing direction in a straight line there must come a point when you are stationary (ie going neither one way nor the other).

 

Yes, but that doesn't require anything else to become stationary.

 

If you move a glass across a table with your hand, your hand doesn't become stationary when it comes in contact with the stationary glass.

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