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Live outside guard dog - thoughts please


nexusdee

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Last night I suffered from an attempted break in - fortunately I was in & on this occasion they got away empty handed. It seems I'm back now to living in fear, too scared to leave the house empty or sleep properly. So I've been wondering about a guard dog. I have a 14 week old Raptorweiler but I'm thinking of a full grown one too. But I have to be careful with an adult because of the two Yorkies, so was considering an outside dog. Obviously I would get done nice luxury dog enclosure. But wondering on people's thoughts as a I'm not sure I could let one live outside without feeling I was mistreating it. I'm just not sure what to do I just want to feel safe

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I am so sorry that you are fearful, living in your home, we all have a right to enjoy our place of safety, and comfort, in peace.

My views on dogs living outside are very simple, allow me to explain......the dog also needs a place of comfort, safety and warmth, which is very difficult to do, on a continual basis, the bedding must be replaced as/when it gets dirty, wet, soiled etc, which may be once/twice a day. The kennel/run needs to weatherproof, of course, and a decent one, is not cheap to purchase. If you have other dogs, the dog that is left outside, will feel ostracised from the family unit, and wonder why it is being punished, they are, of course, pack animals, and being banished from the unit is confusing for them. I couldn't sit in my warm living room, with central living, and look outside at a dog that, with all of anyone's best intentions, and feel comfortable that i was doing the right thing by them.

My answer to your problem, would be to buy a very good house alarm, which will work out cheaper in the long run. I do hope that you sort something out for you and your animals.:)

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I would agree with all the above but also like to add the dog would be best left in the house. How would he stop a break in if he is in an enclosure outside.

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I am so sorry that you are fearful, living in your home, we all have a right to enjoy our place of safety, and comfort, in peace.

My views on dogs living outside are very simple, allow me to explain......the dog also needs a place of comfort, safety and warmth, which is very difficult to do, on a continual basis, the bedding must be replaced as/when it gets dirty, wet, soiled etc, which may be once/twice a day. The kennel/run needs to weatherproof, of course, and a decent one, is not cheap to purchase. If you have other dogs, the dog that is left outside, will feel ostracised from the family unit, and wonder why it is being punished, they are, of course, pack animals, and being banished from the unit is confusing for them. I couldn't sit in my warm living room, with central living, and look outside at a dog that, with all of anyone's best intentions, and feel comfortable that i was doing the right thing by them.

My answer to your problem, would be to buy a very good house alarm, which will work out cheaper in the long run. I do hope that you sort something out for you and your animals.:)

 

Hi, thanks & your thoughts pretty much reflect my own, those who know me are aware my love of animals & that they are always well loved family members, in all honesty I'm not sure if I could force one to live outside anymore then I could my child - although..... Had just been trying to fool myself that perhaps if I got one that had already lived outside it would be happier etc.

I already have a good monitored alarm but to be honest it doesn't make me feel better as they don't stop them from breaking in, just means I know about it. The last time they got in they gave my dog who was 14 at the time a kicking & that frightens me more then any belongings going missing. Not to mention they don't exactly close the doors behind them & just thinking of my dogs getting out & running into the road terrifies me.

Just trying to think of ways to actually put then off breaking in. I'm going to try one of those window & door shutter companies in the new year

 

---------- Post added 24-12-2012 at 10:39 ----------

 

I would agree with all the above but also like to add the dog would be best left in the house. How would he stop a break in if he is in an enclosure outside.

 

Because they would meet him in the back garden

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You could look for a rescue which has already lived outside. Someone I work with looked for a dog for the same reasons. She found a collie who had always lived outside and is more than happy there. The "house dog", a retriever, plays outside with him and they enjoy being together but he stays outside at night and is contented and happy to do so.

It's difficult but there are options - this woman does have a lot of land though and a bit of livestock so there is plenty to keep a collie stimulated which is what they need!

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Have you thought of CCTV alongside a good alarm and good sensor lighting?

 

I don't think a dog will do much to stop them to be honest unless it was properly trained guard dog and then you have the hassle of having to work with a dog that needs different handling. Like you said they are more likely to be injured. If i did live somewhere a bit remote I think I would have a could of guard dogs though that could keep each other company. Often it is the noise that the thieves don't like. I think it depends on your circumstances

 

I think it must be a horrible feeling. Hope you can enjoy Christmas.

If the opinion is right, they are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth.If wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced by its collision with error JS Mill

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It makes sense to ask for a visit from the crime prevention team at the police station. Hopefully someone will be able to examine your particular situation and give some advice.

Definitely get some good sensor lights as a priority. Check your window and door locks too. We had our attached garage broken into a few years ago and they beat a hasty retreat when the alarm went off so yes, they are a good deterrent, although it might cost you a few hundred pounds. The police told us that cctv was not always useful because the images are often not clear enough.

Not sure about your Yorkies but a small, yappy dog can be a deterrent because they draw attention to noise. Outside guard dogs, if fenced in or chained are not going to be much use other than barking. In any case, the determined thief can easily give them some noxious substance disguised in food.

I know how awful this is and I too hope that you can put it behind you at least for Christmas but do get some practical advice.

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There is no problem with a dog living outside but it needs to be a breed that can stand ,our weather ,my diesel lives outside and even though he has a inside part with a heat lamp many a morning he has dragged his bedding outside into his run and be fast asleep ,why we worry so much beggars belief .

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Really sorry to hear about your horrid problem, it must be awful.

 

I think it is ok for a dog to live outside if it has always lived outside and has everything it needs. I would say it would need another outdoor dog for company that's all.

 

I don't think a dog for guarding your house needs to be outside, personally, I think the right breed for the job will be just as good for deterring burglars. Skye, our first dane, lived outside until we got her.

 

She is the perfect deterrent because great danes are quite territorial and bark a lot. They aren't an aggressive breed as such but can be quite fearful and will show aggressive behaviour as a result. Their sheer size puts people off even walking past me, let alone coming near our house. Whether our dogs are in or out, as soon as someone steps onto our drive, they immediately bark and go to see who it is. It is a bit of a problem with the neighbours sometimes but I have trained them enough so they don't bark persistently and the neighbours tell me they are fine with this because they also bark if someone goes onto their drive! The down sides to danes are that they require a clear master and continuous instruction.

 

They like to be home so don't feel the urge to stray. My parents once left our garden gate open by accident and we came home to Alice sat on the doorstep and a neighbour watching over her saying she had been wandering around but wouldn't let him near her so he waited followed her and waited for us to come home bless him. Skye didn't even leave her kennel!

 

We don't own anything worth facing Bella and Skye so I'm sure that any opportunist would pick someone else's house, instead of breaking into ours. You could also put signs up like 'beware of the dog' and 'great dane lives here' etc. There are other breeds that are ideal for this too like GSDs and rottweilers to name the obvious. The advantage of Great Danes is that they are as tall as most adults and they are extremely strong.

 

Consider all of your options first though and talk to companies like these

http://www.adt.co.uk/home-security/home-security-v2?utm_expid=40125127-1&utm_referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.uk%2F wwho offer intruder alerts and panic buttons.

 

---------- Post added 24-12-2012 at 12:43 ----------

 

If you do choose a dog for guarding and consider a great dane, feel free to meet skye and bella and witness their 'behaviour' first hand. There are a few danes needing new home so you don't have to pay the £1000 price tag for a puppy, and you can get to know the dog first.

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I've found that smaller dogs, like terriers, a-la my Jack Russell Girlie are very effective as what my dad refers to as "Good house-dogs".

 

Terriers can be very territorial, and are excellent at raising the alarm if there are trespassers (or indeed, anyone at all) approaching your property.

 

I've found the bigger dogs to be a bit "Doh, Hello, I'm a dog, are you my friend?" whereas terriers are more "Hey! Hey! Enemies in the camp! Enemies in the camp! Trespassers!"

 

I'd only had my Jack-Russ girlie for six months, when some slimeball attempted to burgle me in the early hours. Madam set up such a shouting and yapping, that the scuzzbuckets (fortunately) took off on their toes, having only managed to open my living room window, (Thank God) they got no further, having set the dog off.

 

Alternatively, have you ever heard of "Guard Geese"? if you are somewhere rural, you could always get a gaggle of geese, who can be more than a bit terrier-like if any intruder comes near! lol

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