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Can I use Sudocrem on my cat

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Hi my cat has developed a small sore above his eye, sort of where his eyebrow would be. Is it alright to use a tiny amount of sudocrem on it. Ive looked online and you can buy it for animals on varies pet supplies store, but on other sites it says its toxic to cats. I have some in the house and thought it would save me buying expensive cream from the vets but obviously dont want to harm him. He is a house cat so he hasnt been in a fight with any other animals. Thanks

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Yes you can :) It may not be the most effective thing that you could use, but if you don't have proper animal antiseptic cream then it will be fine :)

 

I was the Sudocrem rep for South Yorkshire for approaching 10 years, and I can tell you that our samples were in great demand, particularly for health visitors and district nurses who had animals. I think every horse/dog/cat/ferret with a cut, graze or sore had Sudocrem on it while I was the rep :)

 

The answer is that if you were to feed your boy a quantity of some of the antiseptic ingredients without all of the rest of the cream then yes, it could be toxic for him, but Sudocrem is developed so that babies can pick up a pot and have a taste without doing themselves any harm, so a little dab in the right place isn't going to do him any harm.

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Thanks for that advice Medusa, I will put a dab on his sore now I know its safe.

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... and thanks for me too medusa ... that's really useful to know.

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Useful posting, are there other human treatments that can be used for animals? I've heard that Golden eye ointment is ok for runny dog and cat eyes?

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One of our horses sunburnt his nose and we were advised by a vet friend to rub sudocrem on it. It eased it and healed it in no time. A good all rounder cream.

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Have you ever tried Sudocrem on sunburn yourself? It's great because it's got a local anaesthetic in as well as things to reduce the swelling in the skin and keep it moisturised. Also great on bites and stings, grazes and rashes of all sorts.

 

I know I'm biased because I used to sell the stuff, but I have a pot of Sudocrem around the house to use myself and pay for it now. For a cream made by a couple on their kitchen table with no company backing at all (originally made by a couple in Ireland called Tom and Sara, hence the original company name of Tosara, made because they couldn't find a good nappy rash cream for their baby) it's turned out to be a really helpful cream for all sorts of things.

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Have you ever tried Sudocrem on sunburn yourself? It's great because it's got a local anaesthetic in as well as things to reduce the swelling in the skin and keep it moisturised. Also great on bites and stings, grazes and rashes of all sorts.

 

I know I'm biased because I used to sell the stuff, but I have a pot of Sudocrem around the house to use myself and pay for it now. For a cream made by a couple on their kitchen table with no company backing at all (originally made by a couple in Ireland called Tom and Sara, hence the original company name of Tosara, made because they couldn't find a good nappy rash cream for their baby) it's turned out to be a really helpful cream for all sorts of things.

 

 

We have 3 pots around the house - it's marvellous stuff! I know a nurse who swears by it as well!

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It is hard to get any accurate information about things like this off the internet. My cat was attacked by the cat down the road (again) and her ear was bleeding. I put a tiny bit of tea tree cream on it and then thought I'd better check if that was OK for use on cats (yes, I know looking *first* might have been a better idea!). The information varied from the merest whiff of it will kill them stone dead to slap it on with a trowel, it'll do them no harm at all!

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I think that part of the problem with this sort of advice is that anything taken in high enough doses is toxic, from water to oxygen, and most things have varying toxicity depending on the species of animal.

 

As I said above, if you were to take some of the ingredients from Sudocrem and feed them undiluted to your cat then of course they may be toxic. However, if you're going to look at the toxicity of (for instance) 1g of a product then when they're diluted in an oily based cream at proportions of 1% by volume or similar then to get the same dose in the cream the animal would have to eat 100g of cream, and that's hardly likely is it?

 

But because they do have a measured toxicity the ingredients will come up on 'poisonous to animals' lists with no reference to the dosage which could cause a problem.

 

This is one of my bugbears with the lists about garden plants which are toxic to animals. The vast majority of these lists make no attempt to separate a plant like daffodils, which a dog would have to eat a bowlful of bulbs to harm themselves, from monkshood (aconitum) where there are loads of cases of animals scratching near the roots of a plant and then washing themselves and dying from the results. A bit of proportion would help with this sort of thing. If the same type of list was to be produced by the veterinary medicine companies then every medication would come up as toxic because they all have a therapeutic dose but can be dangerous in overdose.

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