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Pay 50% up front for a building job?

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Neither Katy3 nor I have suggested that money should be paid for faulty workmanship.

Katy3 was talking about customers looking for faults.

You asked why they should pay if there are faults.

They should not.

As that was obvious, I then gave examples of faults that people 'find' and expect a good wedge of the money to be dismissed.

This was an attempt to broaden the question of whether or not it was right for any tradesman to ask for (whatever %) deposit and discuss the rights and wrongs on both sides of the contract.

The woman who wanted £2000 off for not painting the door, window and skirting board - even if it had been part of the quote and not done, was she justified in asking for that amount? Would she pay a decorator £2000 for that work?

The man who scraped the concrete with a fork - would he have expected a decorator to return to patch up if he'd run a fork down his paintwork to see if it was dry? Would he go to a solicitor and ask for the painter to return and decorate his back bedroom for free because it was looking shabby?

 

Perhaps I should not have quoted your question in my first reply - you are obviously unable to discuss any variables in a given statement or question, but are ploughing on regardless until everyone acknowledges that shoddy work deserves to be penalised and that is probably the first lesson in O level 'Stating the bloody obvious'.

So, to keep the thread on the track you have chosen,here's my reply to the OP

I definatley would not give a 50% deposit.

Here's what I should have replied to your post.

They absolutely should not - well said.

Carry on.....I'm going to a more interesting thread!

 

It happens where the customer trys it on.

 

More so in the building trade than anything else.

 

I have seen my father screwed over by customers literally trying it on or getting him to go above and beyond the original quote. I have seen customers mess him around on payment not because there are any faults with the job but just because they never actually had enough money for the work in the first place.

 

Rogue customers are just as bad as the rogue builders sometimes.

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For me the question is about trust and it is understandable that you should be wary of untested builders . The simple way to cover yourself is to pay for the material direct. Most merchants will accept a cheque on delivery.

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It's normal practise.

 

Normal for the sort of builders that end up featured on consumer TV programmes.

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For me the question is about trust and it is understandable that you should be wary of untested builders . The simple way to cover yourself is to pay for the material direct. Most merchants will accept a cheque on delivery.

 

If you don't trust the builder don't bother using them.

 

Pay in stages by all means but I just get sick of customers that try it on when they clearly never had enough money for the work to be carried out in the first place.

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It happens where the customer trys it on.

 

More so in the building trade than anything else.

 

I have seen my father screwed over by customers literally trying it on or getting him to go above and beyond the original quote. I have seen customers mess him around on payment not because there are any faults with the job but just because they never actually had enough money for the work in the first place.

 

Rogue customers are just as bad as the rogue builders sometimes.

 

Tell me about it!

OH once lost a load of money because the bloke's wife died and he told him that he'd pay the rest when 'everything was settled'.

Never paid and OH too soft to go and ask for money but convinced the guy would pay up. Well 8 years later he still hasn't and must surely think about what he owes everytime he drives into the garage OH built for him.

This job was in Chesterfield so the diesel costs added up too - something that we NEVER charge for.

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I haven't argued that you shouldn't pay the agreed price if the job has no faults...as determined by the original contract...my point,in a reply to Katie3 by the way,was that if there are faults then why would someone expect the customer to just cough up..

 

What I was saying is that they try and find fault when there isnt any.

 

example:- a scratch on the wooden floor which was not by the builder but they want a new floor.

 

another example:- colour of roof tiles agreed before they are put on with the customer and when they are on he decides he dosent like them and wants them changed free of charge. (In this case we knocked it of the bill as we needed the money to move onto the next job as to date he has still not changed the roof tiles)

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Tell me about it!

OH once lost a load of money because the bloke's wife died and he told him that he'd pay the rest when 'everything was settled'.

Never paid and OH too soft to go and ask for money but convinced the guy would pay up. Well 8 years later he still hasn't and must surely think about what he owes everytime he drives into the garage OH built for him.

This job was in Chesterfield so the diesel costs added up too - something that we NEVER charge for.

 

Well your really in a tight spot in that situation.

 

How long do you wait before you ask for money?

 

Should you ask for the money during a difficult time?

 

Although you look back and the answer to that is yes straight away because in the long run it buggers your cashflow and could eventually leave you struggling to pay for things.

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I would be carefull paying 50% up front but if it is a small company they may be having cash flow problems for any of the resons mentioned above. I would offer to pay in stages or pay for meterials yourself. you could always ask for a price for labour only and pay at end of every week ect.

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A builder who cannot fund £1000 materials is a poor planner and manager,and in the current recession any customer is in an exceptionally strong position.You might suggest some dicount for funding the project and gauge their (angry?) reaction.

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Don't pay anything up front !

I did this, and Mark Cashin aka Cashin Construction walked off with my money.

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hi don,t pay up half straight way if he is any good he should be able to foot a £1000 or have a 30 day account . we just took a job on and not ask for a penny until they get back from there holiday and see all the work done . what kind of work are you having done ta jeff

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A builder who cannot fund £1000 materials is a poor planner and manager,and in the current recession any customer is in an exceptionally strong position.You might suggest some dicount for funding the project and gauge their (angry?) reaction.

 

hi gnvqsos are you a retired builder ....

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