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Flags upside down


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I'm all for flying flags whatever nationality you are, I have my Union Jack up at the minute and my St Georges at the ready, I'm not really a big royalist but I do like them. I do totally support our troops in everything they do, I'm not really a big football fan but I will watch England and I do still love this country even in its poor sorry state it's in.

 

So can we a least make the effort if you have bothered to put up a flag make sure it's the right way up!

 

I drove through Killamarsh this morning to see a row of houses all with there flags out, how nice it looked until I then realised half the flags were upside down.

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I drove through Killamarsh this morning to see a row of houses all with there flags out, how nice it looked until I then realised half the flags were upside down.

 

Perhaps the occupants were in distress? Shame on you sir for not investigating further; for all we know they may well now all be dead. Shame on you.

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"In the 18th century the small mast on the bowsprit was replaced by staysails on the stays between the bowsprit and the foremast. By this time the Ensign had become the principal naval distinguishing flag, so it became the practice to fly the Union Jack only in harbour, on a specially rigged staff in the bows of the ships, the jackstaff. It should thus be noted that the jack flag had existed for over a hundred and fifty years before the jack staff came into being, and its name was related to its size rather than to the position in which it was flown.

 

It is often stated that the Union Flag should only be described as the Union Jack when flown in the bows of a warship, but this is a relatively recent idea. From early in its life the Admiralty itself frequently referred to the flag as the Union Jack, whatever its use, and in 1902 an Admiralty Circular announced that Their Lordships had decided that either name could be used officially. Such use was given Parliamentary approval in 1908 when it was stated that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag".

 

Cdr Bruce Nicolls OBE RN (Retd)"

 

I don't want to argue about it but just did this research maybe its out of date.

 

The thick white band on the top next to the flag pole.

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[Pedant Warning]

 

Unless you're at sea it's the Union Flag, not Union Jack

 

Not according to Parliament in 1908. Both names can be used.

 

Edit - Beaten to it by post above

Edited by richkent
See above
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[Pedant Warning]

 

Unless you're at sea it's the Union Flag, not Union Jack

 

Nope, you're wrong.

 

It is often stated that the Union Flag should only be described as the Union Jack when flown in the bows of a warship, but this is a relatively recent idea. From early in its life the Admiralty itself frequently referred to the flag as the Union Jack, whatever its use, and in 1902 an Admiralty Circular announced that Their Lordships had decided that either name could be used officially. Such use was given Parliamentary approval in 1908 when it was stated that "the Union Jack should be regarded as the National flag".

 

http://www.flaginstitute.org/index.php?location=7.2

 

jb

 

ETA: Beaten to it by not reading the whole thread

Edited by barleycorn
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