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Morley Street - allotments?


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'ello,

 

Is there anyone out there who's applied for an allotment on Morley Street, Hillsborough?

 

Would you be interested in forcing the council to do something about the derelict site opposite Morley Street Allotments.

 

The council tried to clear the land 2 years ago, but now it looks wild again.

 

 

There is an attempt by local people to turn this site back to land for growing. They need your support.

 

Feel free to get in touch if you know anything about the history of this site or the established allotments over the road.

 

Nick - 07722373005

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Nick,

I live locally to the site you mention.

When it was cleared it was originally intended to encourage local families to get involved in community schemes to get growing their own veg etc.

We even went on a council list that was set up for interested parties.

The last we heard was a letter in 2009 that said after clearing the site, samples of the soil were sent for analysis and it showed that the land was comtaminated (with, I think, asbestos) And sadly the scheme was pulled cause it was no good for growing on.

In the same letter it said they were looking for an alternative use for that land.

That was over 3 years ago.

 

Feel free to PM me if theres a local interest in the land again, to get something done.

Even a wildflower meadow would be a start instead of the eyesore now.

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I'm not sure about this.. My understanding is also that the land is contaminated with asbestos and is therefore not fit for growing produce on. Whilst it could be described as an eye sore, it is a haven for wildlife which surely can only be a good thing? I have seen many wild animals and birds who use this land including a fox family whose cubs can be seen playing when i go down to my allotment early in the mornings.

Surely the land would be better kept as a small nature reserve? Any land that encourages wildlife must be a good thing in this age of build build build?

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I'm not sure about this.. My understanding is also that the land is contaminated with asbestos and is therefore not fit for growing produce on. Whilst it could be described as an eye sore, it is a haven for wildlife which surely can only be a good thing? I have seen many wild animals and birds who use this land including a fox family whose cubs can be seen playing when i go down to my allotment early in the mornings.

Surely the land would be better kept as a small nature reserve? Any land that encourages wildlife must be a good thing in this age of build build build?

 

Hi Gnomi(How are you btw?!)

I take that back, I think eyesore is the wrong word, although it probably applied when the clearance first took place!

Having another look the young trees really have started to shoot up and it does look like an idylic place in the summer sunshine.

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Thank you all for your responses.

 

The situation as it stands at the moment, is that Sheffield City Council would like to see the site turned back into use, but will not pay for the clear-up of asbestos and fly-tipped rubbish.

 

There are several types of asbestos, some more dangerous than others. It has been said that depending on the levels of contamination this site could still be turned back into land for communal use.

 

The beauty of this area is that it can be all things to anyone willing to be involved.

 

A wild flower meadow is something close to my heart, as is an orchard. Individual plots rented out as allotments is also possible, if folk want to go down that route. If you look at the land surrounding The Sheaf View at Heeley, it's all turned over to communal spaces, with fruit trees and benches and play areas and even a BMX track for kids, not to mention an amazing bouldering rock. All of this is open for anyone to use. I personally picked a carrier bag full of crab-apples to add to the cider I pressed last year.

 

We have received interest from individuals knowledgeable about permaculture who are willing to apply these principles to ensure that the land is in it's optimum usage. We could have a pond, a tree-bog toilet, a cob-oven or BBQ area, soft fruits and an orchard.

 

The choices are endless, as long as the contamination is sorted out first.

 

Nick

@OodianNick

nick.oodian@gardengorilla.co.uk

t: 07722373005

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Hi Gnomi(How are you btw?!)

I take that back, I think eyesore is the wrong word, although it probably applied when the clearance first took place!

Having another look the young trees really have started to shoot up and it does look like an idylic place in the summer sunshine.

 

hi :wave: andy- im fine thanks!

hope you are too..

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Thank you all for your responses.

 

The situation as it stands at the moment, is that Sheffield City Council would like to see the site turned back into use, but will not pay for the clear-up of asbestos and fly-tipped rubbish.

 

There are several types of asbestos, some more dangerous than others. It has been said that depending on the levels of contamination this site could still be turned back into land for communal use.

 

The beauty of this area is that it can be all things to anyone willing to be involved.

 

A wild flower meadow is something close to my heart, as is an orchard. Individual plots rented out as allotments is also possible, if folk want to go down that route. If you look at the land surrounding The Sheaf View at Heeley, it's all turned over to communal spaces, with fruit trees and benches and play areas and even a BMX track for kids, not to mention an amazing bouldering rock. All of this is open for anyone to use. I personally picked a carrier bag full of crab-apples to add to the cider I pressed last year.

 

We have received interest from individuals knowledgeable about permaculture who are willing to apply these principles to ensure that the land is in it's optimum usage. We could have a pond, a tree-bog toilet, a cob-oven or BBQ area, soft fruits and an orchard.

 

The choices are endless, as long as the contamination is sorted out first.

 

Nick

@OodianNick

nick.oodian@gardengorilla.co.uk

t: 07722373005

 

Nick, what you are describing here is absolutley brilliant! I would fully support the kind of plans you are talking about there as the land could then be used by everyone, including our wildlife friends :) What do i need to do to help push the clear up plans through?

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Nick, what you are describing here is absolutley brilliant! I would fully support the kind of plans you are talking about here as the land could then be used by everyone, including our wildlife friends :) What do i need to do to help push the clear up plans through?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all

 

Unfortunately the plot of land you are speaking of had been intended for use as allotments for families at risk of obesity, but was found to have soil not suitable to allotment gardening due to a high iron content. Therefore any plans for the use of the site were shelved.

 

This was discussed repeatedly at Allotment Advisory Group and SALGF meetings throughout 09, 10 and 2011 if anyone would like more information, these groups are the best to approach.

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