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Etymology of phrases with industrial origins


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I'm thinking of phrases such as 'keeping your nose to the grindstone', 'whetting the appetite', 'being on tenterhooks' and such like.

 

I haven't thought for too long and I am sure there are loads more, but can anyone help me out here?

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Ahah - 'no use crying over spilt milk'.

The others weren't known to me; I'll go look up fettling and rammel.

 

Thank you!

 

PS, isn't 'fettling' something courting couples used to do?!

 

Edit:

fettle Look up fettle at Dictionary.com

"condition, state, trim," c.1750, Lancashire dialect, from fettle (v.) "to make ready, arrange" (14c.), perhaps from O.E. fetel "a girdle, belt," from P.Gmc. *fatiloz (cf. Ger. fessel "fetter, chain," O.N. fetill "strap, brace"), from *fat- "to hold."

Edited by SHsheff
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Ahah - 'no use crying over spilt milk'.

The others weren't known to me; I'll go look up fettling and rammel.

Thank you!

PS, isn't 'fettling' something courting couples used to do?!

teeming and ladling is what they used to do with the molten steel. Pouring it between containers to cool it down.

fettling is cleaning up cast metal, taking all the swarf off.

rammel is all the waste from a process.

 

No, lol, you may be thinking of furtling ... ;)

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teeming and ladling is what they used to do with the molten steel. Pouring it between containers to cool it down.

fettling is cleaning up cast metal, taking all the swarf off.

rammel is all the waste from a process.

 

No, lol, you may be thinking of furtling ... ;)

 

Ahah, I KNEW I'd missed out on something in my youth! And, what's more, not a word that is seemingly known to Google's etymology sites. But you're quite right, it's a Sheffield term.

 

I remember being asked to 'bring something for a furtle' at one place I worked at - turns out they meant food for a bit of an office party!

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Ahah, I KNEW I'd missed out on something in my youth! And, what's more, not a word that is seemingly known to Google's etymology sites. But you're quite right, it's a Sheffield term.

 

I remember being asked to 'bring something for a furtle' at one place I worked at - turns out they meant food for a bit of an office party!

I've never heard that one ... we used to say 'a bit of a fuddle' .. maybe they had the wrong word as well! hehe.
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teeming and ladling is what they used to do with the molten steel. Pouring it between containers to cool it down.

fettling is cleaning up cast metal, taking all the swarf off.

rammel is all the waste from a process.

 

No, lol, you may be thinking of furtling ... ;)

 

Or felching.

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