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Balaclava Road, Sheffield 6


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Does anyone have any history about Balalcava Road, Sheff, 6?

 

I grew up there in the late 1940's, 50's and early 60's and was told it originally was part of the Balaclava Barracks for the foot soldiers in the Balaclava war. Unfortunately I cannot find a record of this anywhere. The next road was called Barrack Lane! It sounds right!

 

Where I lived had been one enormous building that had been split into 'back to back' houses (after the 1939-45 war), so even that pointed to the rumour being right.

 

Balaclava Road was between Penistone Road and Infirmary Road.

 

Would love ANY help!

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Does anyone have any history about Balalcava Road, Sheff, 6?

 

I grew up there in the late 1940's, 50's and early 60's and was told it originally was part of the Balaclava Barracks for the foot soldiers in the Balaclava war. Unfortunately I cannot find a record of this anywhere. The next road was called Barrack Lane! It sounds right!

 

Where I lived had been one enormous building that had been split into 'back to back' houses (after the 1939-45 war), so even that pointed to the rumour being right.

 

Balaclava Road was between Penistone Road and Infirmary Road.

 

Would love ANY help!

 

 

Extracts from previous posts.

 

Stephen Johnson in Bailey to Bailey - A Short History of Military

Buildings in Sheffield describes the location of the old Sheffield

Barracks, or Horse Barracks, as at Hillfoot, at the bottom of Whitehouse

Lane on land bounded by the modern roads of Infirmary Road, Penistone Road,

Wood Street and Barrack Lane. It is clearly shown on an 1832 map.

 

Construction of the Barracks commenced 27th July 1792, opened 1794, cost over £2,000.

Built of brick and stone, it housed two troops of cavalry - about 200 men. Built mainly of brick, stone was used for decoration. It was known locally as The Horse Barracks. Until a few years ago there was a pub near there called The Light Horseman

 

Construction of Hillsborough Barracks started in 1848

 

 

What's your name? I grew up on Infirmary Road around the time you speak of!!

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A reply to Hillsbro - Thank you so much. The 'photo made my back shiver as it is the first time I have seen it looking like that since my childhood. I lived at the bottom, on the left hand side.

 

A reply to Kevinlad - Thank you to you as well, very much, this means so much as I thought I must have been making it up!

 

We were told the barracks had 5 levels, 2 below ground level and 3 above. The bottom 'cellar' was where the ammunition was stored, the next 'cellar' was for provisions ect. Part of the building was knocked down in the blizt but the remaining part was made into individual houses (back to back houses). We had one cellar (the one below had been filled) and then three levels (living room/kitchen, bedroom and attic).

 

It would, originally, have been one building which was connected by arches, some of these were still apparent in some of the properties (we had one in the cellar).

 

I went to Philadelphia Infant and Junior school, on West Don Street from about 3 (nursery) until 11 when we were shipped to Chaucer School, up Herries Road. I was at the 'little' school between 1951 and 1959 ish. Are any of these dates the same as when you lived there?

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A reply to Hillsbro - Thank you so much. The 'photo made my back shiver as it is the first time I have seen it looking like that since my childhood. I lived at the bottom, on the left hand side.

 

A reply to Kevinlad - Thank you to you as well, very much, this means so much as I thought I must have been making it up!

 

We were told the barracks had 5 levels, 2 below ground level and 3 above. The bottom 'cellar' was where the ammunition was stored, the next 'cellar' was for provisions ect. Part of the building was knocked down in the blizt but the remaining part was made into individual houses (back to back houses). We had one cellar (the one below had been filled) and then three levels (living room/kitchen, bedroom and attic).

 

It would, originally, have been one building which was connected by arches, some of these were still apparent in some of the properties (we had one in the cellar).

 

I went to Philadelphia Infant and Junior school, on West Don Street from about 3 (nursery) until 11 when we were shipped to Chaucer School, up Herries Road. I was at the 'little' school between 1951 and 1959 ish. Are any of these dates the same as when you lived there?

 

 

I went to Philadelphia school from being an infant until 1958 when Chaucer opened. I was at Chaucer for the first term only. Mr Newham was my form teacher.

You appear to be a little younger than me but would probably remember my younger sister and brother.

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The teachers I remember from Philadelphia School were Mr Holland (geography), Miss Hart (English) and Mrs Burke. Mrs Burke used to be the teacher for junior 2 when you were taught 'joined up' writing. Woe betied you if you got it wrong because you would get a caning (accross the hand). Do you or your family remember any of these teachers?

 

I believe that Mr Holland and Miss Hart went up to Chaucer and seem to remember going into their classes for the relevant subject they taught.

 

Do you remember Graham Earnshaw or Trevor Thomas, they were in my class?

 

Carol Smith was a little older than me and there was a Sheila (something or other!).

 

The shop half way down Balaclava Road was taken over by a family called Taylor, the daughter was called Marylin. The shop was always open perhaps you might remember it.

 

What a lovely bit of nostalgia!!

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The teachers I remember from Philadelphia School were Mr Holland (geography), Miss Hart (English) and Mrs Burke. Mrs Burke used to be the teacher for junior 2 when you were taught 'joined up' writing. Woe betied you if you got it wrong because you would get a caning (accross the hand). Do you or your family remember any of these teachers?

 

I believe that Mr Holland and Miss Hart went up to Chaucer and seem to remember going into their classes for the relevant subject they taught.

 

Do you remember Graham Earnshaw or Trevor Thomas, they were in my class?

 

Carol Smith was a little older than me and there was a Sheila (something or other!).

 

The shop half way down Balaclava Road was taken over by a family called Taylor, the daughter was called Marylin. The shop was always open perhaps you might remember it.

 

What a lovely bit of nostalgia!!

 

I certainly remember Mrs. Burke!! I think she must have caned me most days!! And I do remember Miss Hart.

 

My fourth year teacher before we went to Chaucer was Mr. Sanderson, in S3 I was taught by Mr. Popple, S2 was Mr. Cooil, S1 was Miss Rowland. Going further back J3 and J4 was Mr Hughes, J2 as you said was Mrs. Burke and if I remember correctly, J1 was Miss Pratt.

 

The shops in your immediate area on Infirmary Road which I remember were Clough's - Grocers, Cole's - Chemist, Sykes - Sweets and Tobacco.

 

Across the road was a small newsagent, Ronksley's, operated from their front room! A little lower down Infirmary road was Latham's which we always knew as the 'button shop' because the old lady sold all those dressmaking extras, along with a fine selection of ribbons which my sister would wear in her hair.

I could go on but I'll save it for another time!

 

The names Graham Earnshaw and Carol Smith ring a bell but I can't put faces to the names.

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Hi hillsbro,great photo,plus I'm 90% sure the car,on the top righthand,of the photo belonged to my Grandparents. Its the same model (It was green.) I have a photo of my brother & I stood at the side of it around 1968/69,at an event.

They lived with my Mother & Uncle,in White House buildings which you got to though the entrance on the lefthand side of your photo. Sure they lived above the chemist. I know they went to the school mentioned. Their surname,was Cawton.

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hi r8mnw - yes, I well remember Harry S. Allen's chemist's shop there. I knew the area fairly well as I had a school pal who lived on Alwyn Street (now long-gone, it was a short cul-de-sac off Robert Street). The "White House Buildings" (which still carry the name) are one of several similar early-1900s developments on that part of Infirmary Road, with shops at street level and flats above, access to the flats being via steps that led to a yard at first floor level. Memories!

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