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Only good kraut is a dead kraut ?


monkey69

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The pain of Patrick Moore and why the Radio Times went wrong

 

The Radio Times has published an interview with Patrick Moore in which he opines that the “only good Kraut is a dead Kraut”. As someone who lives with a half-Kraut/half-Paddy hybrid who I love very dearly, I obviously think Patrick is very wrong but the Radio Times is most in the wrong here.

Moore’s views come not from common or garden xenophobia but from a trauma that has haunted him for most of his life. His fiancé, a nurse, was killed by a bomb while he was abroad fighting in the army during World War II.

He has long said that he has never married because he has never got over her death. However unfair it might be, he cannot help but blame Germany for his long dead love. His comments are distasteful but they come from a place of utter pain and anguish.

Indeed, in his autobiography he states that he still thinks of his would-be bride and that because of her death “if I saw the entire German nation sinking into the sea, I could be relied upon to help push it down”.

Journalists can’t resist a good quote. When an interviewee gives you a juicy line, it’s hard not to include it. But in this case, I think the Radio Times is wrong to have promoted the interview on the back of Moore’s angry remarks about the German nation. It is a deep scar from a different time. Many other men of his generation hold the same views but they are not held up for inspection, in their dotage, by the media and public alike.

We should commend Moore for his good work in spreading the joy of science and astronomy and look on his comments as the echoes of the kind of terrible trauma that is so hard for anyone to erase.

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The Germans paid in spades for the war they started. Whatever we suffered they had it far worse.

It's all water under the bridge now. What do the ramblings of a bitter old man relate to in this day and age?

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The pain of Patrick Moore and why the Radio Times went wrong

 

The Radio Times has published an interview with Patrick Moore in which he opines that the “only good Kraut is a dead Kraut”. As someone who lives with a half-Kraut/half-Paddy hybrid who I love very dearly, I obviously think Patrick is very wrong but the Radio Times is most in the wrong here.

Moore’s views come not from common or garden xenophobia but from a trauma that has haunted him for most of his life. His fiancé, a nurse, was killed by a bomb while he was abroad fighting in the army during World War II.

He has long said that he has never married because he has never got over her death. However unfair it might be, he cannot help but blame Germany for his long dead love. His comments are distasteful but they come from a place of utter pain and anguish.

Indeed, in his autobiography he states that he still thinks of his would-be bride and that because of her death “if I saw the entire German nation sinking into the sea, I could be relied upon to help push it down”.

Journalists can’t resist a good quote. When an interviewee gives you a juicy line, it’s hard not to include it. But in this case, I think the Radio Times is wrong to have promoted the interview on the back of Moore’s angry remarks about the German nation. It is a deep scar from a different time. Many other men of his generation hold the same views but they are not held up for inspection, in their dotage, by the media and public alike.

We should commend Moore for his good work in spreading the joy of science and astronomy and look on his comments as the echoes of the kind of terrible trauma that is so hard for anyone to erase.

 

I agree with you that many of his generation have the same views,and who are we to judge when we can't possibly understand what some of them suffered.

I expect there are Germans of that generation who feel the same,though i never came across that attitude when i lived in Germany for a brief period in the eighties. I was working in a Hospital and the people were very friendly,I had connections with some who had been through the first world war as well.I could tell you a touching story relating to that,but its rather long and would probably sound off topic

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I agree with you that many of his generation have the same views,and who are we to judge when we can't possibly understand what some of them suffered.

I expect there are Germans of that generation who feel the same,though i never came across that attitude when i lived in Germany for a brief period in the eighties.

 

There is one huge difference - the Germans had to face the fact that, to a greater or lesser extent, they brought it upon themselves.

 

Patrick Moore has never been able to forgive "Germany" for the killing of his fiancee, but that hasn't stopped him from being good friends with German astronomers.

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I can recall people using this expression when I was a child, it was quite common then, in the post-war years.

 

While I don't think this is acceptable or relevent in this day and age, I can understand that Moore is an old man now, and was obviously affected by his experiences of war - as were a good many people of that age. It makes me wonder, in his increasing old age, that maybe he is regressing slightly, as older people tend to do. It might be that he wasn't quite so bitter ten or fifteen years ago.

 

Good luck to him, and I hope he can find some peace in the years to come :thumbsup:

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