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Help please for fishtank care


habibi

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hi i got a fishtank from a friend and i put gravel,plant,deco,fresh water 2 pump.i only got 3 fish in it but every day the water is so green ,please what am i doing wrong to not have nice clear water any idea or advice for me please thx kind regards aliu

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Please ignore hound&house and robertathome. Little tank is asking the right questions though.

 

I can tell you that the most likely cause is free ammonia and light which has led to a free floating algal bloom. Does it remind you of pea soup?

http://www.aquaticscape.com/articles/algae.htm

Check that site out and look at the green water picture.

 

We definitely need more information to really help.

 

But the most basic advice would be to first do at least 2 50% water changes.

 

Also don't turn the tank light on. The fish wont mind being in the dark. If there is any direct natural light getting into the tank then consider sticky taping black plastic bags around the sides where the light is getting in.

 

Then take a sample of water down to your local fish shop (if they do water testing), and ask them to test for ammonia and nitrites. Or alternatively go to your local fish shop and buy yourself a testing kit (API master test kit is my personal favourite). Then check out what your ammonia and nitrite levels are. Although it may be hard to work it out with the water being green already so I'd be tempted to keep doing water changes until the water was clear, then to leave it for 12 hours or so and test the ammonia and nitrite levels then.

 

I'd also highly recommend reading these 3 articles:

What is cycling

The nitrogen cycle

Fish-in cycling

 

I'd also suggest joining the forum those articles are on http://www.fishforums.net

It's a great active forum for fishkeepers. There are people from all over the world so you can get responses 24/7 and because it's for fishkeepers you're likely to get the best possible advice.

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Please ignore hound&house and robertathome. Little tank is asking the right questions though.

 

I can tell you that the most likely cause is free ammonia and light which has led to a free floating algal bloom. Does it remind you of pea soup?

http://www.aquaticscape.com/articles/algae.htm

Check that site out and look at the green water picture.

 

We definitely need more information to really help.

 

But the most basic advice would be to first do at least 2 50% water changes.

 

Also don't turn the tank light on. The fish wont mind being in the dark. If there is any direct natural light getting into the tank then consider sticky taping black plastic bags around the sides where the light is getting in.

 

Then take a sample of water down to your local fish shop (if they do water testing), and ask them to test for ammonia and nitrites. Or alternatively go to your local fish shop and buy yourself a testing kit (API master test kit is my personal favourite). Then check out what your ammonia and nitrite levels are. Although it may be hard to work it out with the water being green already so I'd be tempted to keep doing water changes until the water was clear, then to leave it for 12 hours or so and test the ammonia and nitrite levels then.

 

I'd also highly recommend reading these 3 articles:

What is cycling

The nitrogen cycle

Fish-in cycling

 

I'd also suggest joining the forum those articles are on http://www.fishforums.net

It's a great active forum for fishkeepers. There are people from all over the world so you can get responses 24/7 and because it's for fishkeepers you're likely to get the best possible advice.

 

why ignore robertathome, the most likely cause is too much light on the tank or the light being left on too long, another thing to consider is what type of lighting is the op using, if its tube lights consider changing the tube as they do have a a certain amount of usage and should ideally be changed at leat once a year.

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@The OP - Forgot the mention to make sure there is plenty of surface agitation by the filter/pump at night/when the lights are off cause you need to keep the oxygen levels up.

 

@Stingray-man - Because the main cause of green water is different to the main cause of algae which is attached to rocks and glass etc.

 

The main cause of green water is excess ammonia/imbalance of nutrients combined with the light. Normally without the excess ammonia/nutrients you can't have green water regardless of the amount of light (unless it's literally in a south facing conservatory or you've stuck ridiculous lights over the top). If you have a fully cycled tank with reasonable nitrates then lots of light tends to give outbreaks of different types of algae to the type which creates green water.

 

But my specific reasons were:

Anyone who doesn't give you all the information you need (ie. that it could be ammonia and/or light) should probably be ignored.

Anyone who suggests buying more fish is the answer when you have some sort of issue in your tank should probably be ignored. Even more so if they don't know what size tank it is or the current inhabitants.

Also... bristlenoses to clear green water...

 

Just so the people I diregarded know. I wasn't trying to be rude. I just didn't have time to give a full explanation as to why the information given should be disregarded. And these are living animals, which are likely to be being exposed to ammonia right now. And even if they aren't could easily die from lack of oxygen at night if the problem isn't resolved.

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