Jump to content

£1 to become Lord of the Manor and order about ye serfs


Recommended Posts

But yesterday the neighbours were faced with costs of around £650,000 after their appeal was rejected at the High Court.

 

The saga, which saw lawyers delving into records going back almost 1,000 years, began after Mr Burton moved to the village of Ireby in Lancashire 12 years ago.

According to the villagers’ side, the ruling means Mr Burton no longer has rights over the village green and other land near their houses and therefore cannot ‘order them around’.

 

Legal fight: Ex-banker Peter Burton, 61, who bought his title for just £1

Having retired from banking, he bought a 17th century manor house, Over Hall, with his partner, Susan Bamford.

He set about pouring money and effort into restoring the Jacobean property and surrounding area.

Problems began, however, when Mr Burton paid £1 for the right to call himself Lord of the Manor of Ireby.

He claimed this also gave him title over nearby beauty spot Ireby Fell – 360 wild acres at the highest point in the county – which until then had been regarded as unregistered common land.

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2131304/How-1-lord-manor-left-villagers-650k-bill.html#ixzz1sQbqhXjT

 

The serfs must do as they are told.

 

And that is an example of the greatest theft in this country.

 

This country is built upon the theft of the land from the people.

 

The welfare state and 'allotments' came about from thefts like these. To placate the masses from rising up.

 

The men of this country lack the right to grow their own food. They are not guaranteed a job. And no longer are they guaranteed benefits. The coming years will be very interesting indeed. As the poor fight for survival, and whilst the gentry attempt to preserve their so called 'legal' monopolies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The article, and the ruling to which it refers, both make very clear that they are under no such obligation. He can't even legally call himself "Lord of the Manor" - the title has long since lapsed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2131304/How-1-lord-manor-left-villagers-650k-bill.html#ixzz1sQbqhXjT

 

The serfs must do as they are told.

 

And that is an example of the greatest theft in this country.

 

This country is built upon the theft of the land from the people.

 

The welfare state and 'allotments' came about from thefts like these. To placate the masses from rising up.

 

The men of this country lack the right to grow their own food. They are not guaranteed a job. And no longer are they guaranteed benefits. The coming years will be very interesting indeed. As the poor fight for survival, and whilst the gentry attempt to preserve their so called 'legal' monopolies.

 

chem1st, we don't always agree, but today is not one of those days.

Edited by WeX
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The article, and the ruling to which it refers, both make very clear that they are under no such obligation. He can't even legally call himself "Lord of the Manor" - the title has long since lapsed.

 

In 2010 a Land Registry panel ruled that Mr Burton could not style himself Lord of the Manor of Ireby because the title has lapsed.

 

But it confirmed he and his partner as ‘proprietors’ of the fell, pointing out that they had spent time, money and effort on maintaining the land.

 

In all but name.

 

Nothing but a land grab, but back then they at least had the decency to call the serfs, "serfs" and the landed gentry (land thieves), "lord".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In all but name.

 

Nothing but a land grab, but back then they at least had the decency to call the serfs, "serfs" and the landed gentry (land thieves), "lord".

 

As far as I can see from your article he's basically ended up with the maintenance bill for a large chunk of previously unmaintained land without any of the benefits of private ownership, no land registration cert for EU subsidies, no nothing, just a bill. Do you have any idea how much land can cost to maintain?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I can see from your article he's basically ended up with the maintenance bill for a large chunk of previously unmaintained land without any of the benefits of private ownership, no land registration cert for EU subsidies, no nothing, just a bill. Do you have any idea how much land can cost to maintain?

 

If that land was divided up into 360 plots of 1 acre each, each liable for a tax upon it's rentable value, then that land would be developed very quickly.

 

The land would be 'maintained' and more importantly it would be improved and it would be occupied, the people using it would benefit, and society as a whole would benefit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that land was divided up into 360 plots of 1 acre each, each liable for a tax upon it's rentable value, then that land would be developed very quickly.

 

I think most people would prefer that areas of scenic beauty not be built upon; thankfully we have people like Mr. Burton who are willing to invest years of time and effort, and large amounts of money, in keeping them beautiful.

 

But that has nothing to do with your thread title, which is specifically about this "Lord of the Manor" nonsense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that land was divided up into 360 plots of 1 acre each, each liable for a tax upon it's rentable value, then that land would be developed very quickly.

 

The land would be 'maintained' and more importantly it would be improved and it would be occupied, the people using it would benefit, and society as a whole would benefit.

 

Please tell me you understand the difference between land maintenance and just sticking random structures on it?

 

On another note your 1 acre plots point has reminded me of another thing on my to-do list for a recently widowed friend, it genuinely involves a total ******* stealing land from many people, oppressing the locals and acting very much like an old style lord. Are you game to get stuck in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think most people would prefer that areas of scenic beauty not be built upon; thankfully we have people like Mr. Burton who are willing to invest years of time and effort, and large amounts of money, in keeping them beautiful.

 

But that has nothing to do with your thread title, which is specifically about this "Lord of the Manor" nonsense.

 

The case does not solely deal with open land.

 

The Burtons, in their claim to manorial rights, claimed that some of the local residents residential property should also belong to them.

Injunctions were threatened.

 

This was a major reason for the locals objections.

 

 

http://www.lordmarcher.com/page11.php

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.