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Advice please, on new router.


Waldo

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Hi,

 

I need some NAS that I can access from Mac, and Windows PCs (and Linux, eventually). Will be using it to store files, possibly an iTunes server, and also for SVN repositories.

 

I'll need a new wireless router too (current one must be over 10 years old), and I'm thinking to get one with gigabit LAN. So I can connect my computers to it, and also the NAS, and everything is fast and zippy at 1000mbps.

 

I get my internet from Virgin, so it's cable; and have a modem already that connects to my router with a RJ45 cable. If I can get a wireless router, with a modem built in, that would be great (can get rid of one appliance then).

 

So, looking on Amazon, and I've found the following kit...

 

Wireless router:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Billion-BiPAC-7800N-Broadband-Wireless-N/dp/B002TOKGL8/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_t_1

 

NAS:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Synology-DS212J-Bay-NAS-Enclosure/dp/B005TOXMAW/ref=sr_1_2?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1334694085&sr=1-2

 

Any thoughts? Will this router allow me to get rid of existing cable modem? Is there better, more suitable kit, for my needs? Any suggestions, or recommendations, would be great.

 

Also, a bit cautious with the fact that the NAS needs to be formatted as ext4. One of the reviews on Amazon, mentions that this will not be 100% compatible with the normal Mac file-system (think there was mention of it not doing files beginning with a '.' or a '\').

 

Cheers,

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Hi,

.... One of the reviews on Amazon, mentions that this will not be 100% compatible with the normal Mac file-system (think there was mention of it not doing files beginning with a '.' or a '\')...

 

Files whose names begin with a period "." are made invisible in Mac's Finder by default. This reserves them for system use - although you can display them by launching Terminal and typing:

 

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE

 

killall Finder

 

\ isn't used at all on a Mac's file system.

/ indicates a step in a directory path such as in, "Users/Waldo/Documents".

 

You should generally avoid using / in Mac file names.

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Routers make pretty poor NAS boxes, especially if you plan to use them as a router at the same time.

 

Once you get to the price range of a good NAS box, you could build your own ATOM Linux PC for the same price and it would be much more flexible with what software you can put on it.

 

If you are interested though, here is a good table of performance:

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-charts/bar/5-r5-filecopy-write

 

You also do not mention if you need a cable/ethernet router or a DSL one?

Edited by AlexAtkin
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Many thanks for all your help and suggestions.

 

One thing about using the router as the NAS, or connecting some kind of USB storage device to it. Is, well, I'd have a concern with the file transfer speed. USB2 not being as fast as gigabit ethernet.

 

A gigabit ethernet would be 1000mbps.

My external firewire800 drive is 800mbps.

An external USB2.0 drive would be 480mbps.

 

I'm wondering if I may be better off for now, just using an external firewire800 drive.

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Whilst I don't own any firewire peripherals I will always believe Firewire to be the best media/um transfer 'protocol' - I was very disheartened to see on 'Click!' nearly a year ago about manufacturers dropping firewire in favour of USB 3.0! (USB = Up, Stop, Baulk!) - Firewire = SMOOOOOTH! data transfer!:hihi:

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I guess we have pretty much covered this in the Gigabit ethernet thread, but just to point out.

 

The speed of using a router as a NAS is nothing to do with USB2. USB2 can handle up to around 35MB/s which is comparable to the speed of low-end dedicated NAS boxes.

 

In actual fact the lack of CPU power and RAM of the router itself, at least when I tried, limited the speed to 5MB/s anyway and would frequently stall.

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Whilst I don't own any firewire peripherals I will always believe Firewire to be the best media/um transfer 'protocol' - I was very disheartened to see on 'Click!' nearly a year ago about manufacturers dropping firewire in favour of USB 3.0! (USB = Up, Stop, Baulk!) - Firewire = SMOOOOOTH! data transfer!:hihi:

 

FireWire is great for video where you need a constant stream of data. FW400 will easily handle two streams of DV from a two disk striped RAID, FW800 gets almost four streams without dropped frames. USB on the other hand, transfers in packets and requires a "handshake" at each end. That's OK for low bandwidth stuff like photos and music or simple file transfers.

 

Thunderbolt aka LightPeak is impressive, I had one of these for review recently. It is extremely fast and I really wanted to keep it. Currently four lane PCIe, it will be a blast when we get optical cables with 10GB/sec in both directions. But at $2500 a pop it's not going to find many customers at the consumer level, however fast it is.

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I use a DLink NAS with 2 x 1tb drives. One for storage and one as an automatic backup every 24 hrs. Conected by lan to the router and then the pc(s). Never had a problem yet with data transfer speed (although I have never run a test on it).

 

http://www.dlink.co.uk/cs/Satellite?c=TechSupport_C&childpagename=DLinkEurope-GB%2FDLTechProduct&cid=1197388178398&packedargs=locale%3D1195806691854&pagename=DLinkEurope-GB%2FDLWrapper&p=1197318962293

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