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Digital Region Project may seek commercial operator to rescue it


Paddy

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To make myself clear i wasn't having a go at origin, I'm sure they offer a fine product and service, i was knocking the sales tactics and what seems its social media mouthpiece.

 

---------- Post added 27-09-2013 at 16:23 ----------

 

That's unfair, origin_pete has always quite clearly stated who he is employed by and what his job is. There's nothing misleading about that.

 

K.

 

You must have missed the post where Pete was telling someone with a faulty router that switching to origin would solve there problems when in fact all that was needed was a new router and was nothing to do with the service they were getting.

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That's unfair, origin_pete has always quite clearly stated who he is employed by and what his job is. There's nothing misleading about that.

 

K.

 

True, but denomis does have a point.

 

There have been occasions when people have had WiFi or landline problems on BT and Pete suggested they move to Origin to fix it, with blatant disregard for the fact such a change was unlikely to fix that particular issue. That IS misleading, because with all due respect to Origin, line faults get fixed FASTER on BT and a LOT of WiFi issues are misconfiguration or the fact the spectrum is totally overloaded now.

 

Many a Digital Region customer have moved back to BT purely because Openreach were utterly useless at fixing faults if it was a Digital Region service. I would go so far as to accuse them of being anti-competitive with how they dealt with DR lines.

 

I also have cringed at how frequent the advertising posts were, it did feel like it slipped into the land of spamming the forum rather than light advertising. However, the forum mods seemed okay with it so who was I to argue?

 

Its a difficult balance, because how else could they get across the message that there WERE alternatives to BT for fast broadband? I can understand both sides and neither is necessarily right.

Edited by AlexAtkin
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  • 2 months later...

I'm hoping that BT don't buy the network because they're already getting a lot of UK broadband infrastructure for a song under the BDUK system! They''ve got too much of a monopoly as it is. I'd prefer some other Content Delivery Network (CDN) to pick it up for their own backhaul such as Akamai for instance, perhaps getting some of their servers into Origin's datacenter and allowing more resillient peering with all the broadband providers. I'd also hope that they would be able to keep the network 'as is' with possible expansion and actually manage it well. If worst came to it, for me at least, Origin seem to now be provisioning on BT Wholesale fibre cabinets too so they could shift me over, however I don't really want to be QoS'd via the BT wholesale backhaul/network if it came to that.

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I'm hoping that BT don't buy the network because they're already getting a lot of UK broadband infrastructure for a song under the BDUK system! They''ve got too much of a monopoly as it is. I'd prefer some other Content Delivery Network (CDN) to pick it up for their own backhaul such as Akamai for instance, perhaps getting some of their servers into Origin's datacenter and allowing more resillient peering with all the broadband providers. I'd also hope that they would be able to keep the network 'as is' with possible expansion and actually manage it well. If worst came to it, for me at least, Origin seem to now be provisioning on BT Wholesale fibre cabinets too so they could shift me over, however I don't really want to be QoS'd via the BT wholesale backhaul/network if it came to that.

 

BT might have a monoply, but you need someone to look after the network and manage it properly (including dealing with faults within a reasonable time) - it was only because of the constant network disconnections I was having that forced me to leave the network, along with it being cheaper on BT for a faster connection at the time (and still is). If it wasn't for that I would have stayed on the network.

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That is assuming that BT DO manage the network properly and deal with faults in a reasonable time.

 

The biggest problem with Digital Region faults was that BT refused to liase with Thales properly so both sides were constantly passing the blame to the other. I know this first-hand as when BT mucked up my Digital Region install by getting a trainee to do the cabinet rewire and not testing at from my house afterwards, I sat with the DR engineer at the cabinet waiting for BT to turn up to fix it. I even had the MD of Origin sat at my cabinet waiting for BT to turn up (they were a much smaller company back then). It was only once it got raised as a voice fault that BT did a thing about it and it ended up being ME who told the BT engineer what was going on. I don't think rewarding BT for that behaviour by making their monopoly bigger is the right course of action.

 

A big CDN would know how to manage the network better than anyone and have the resources to do so. Although I'm not sure how many CDN actually have FTTC as part of their infrastructure. Still, its not impossible.

 

One problem though is that some of the Digital Region network is actually leased from Virgin, would they want to continue doing that?

Edited by AlexAtkin
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