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Smith's Field or Smithies Field near Petre Street

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(Quote)"Going back up Petre st on the right there was the fusty sweet shop and then on the corner of Sutherland rd and Petre st Fairbrothers tailors, I went to school with Janet Fairbrother.

Tony Wagstaff, John Timmins, Stu Butler, Tony Saccomando, Phillip Gill all good swimmers because of that sadist Mr Scott."

 

I could have sworn Janet's family name was Fairweather, as I went to school with her younger sister Julie. Maybe my mind is playing up. I lived on the same road as John Timmins on Alliance Street before they were demolished, and Stu Butler and his family lived near us on the new Carwood Estate. A real trip down memory lane.

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I have fond memories of watching cricket at the ground (Smithies Field) just off Petre Street in the 1940s, when I was walking from Newhall to my grandmother's house in Danville Street. It was great fun to stop off and watch, and I think sometimes I even forgot that I was supposed to be on my way to Gran's! I remember Petre Street in those days had a local hero called Hancock, a ginger-haired lad. I think he was a fast bowler, but, anyway, he was a matchwinner on a number of occasions, I'm sure. Just up the road from the ground, there was a corner shop in the window of which there was always a team sheet and details of the next match. I have a feeling that Hancock had some connection with this shop. I wish I could find out more about him, and I winder if there are any of his relatives still around?

Incidentally, the references to Woodhill, a house on the top side of the ground, in fact on Grimesthorpe Road, reminds me that a great uncle of mine was, or so I was told, the occupant of either this house or one close to it. His name was James (Surname) and he was melting shop manager at Firth's in about 1896-1900. He married a woman from Upper Langwith in Derbyshire, and this woman was my grandfather's sister. I remember that when I was told about the Grimesthorpe Road link, I went to look at the house, and, frankly, it didn't seem half as grand as I had imagined it.

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Many years ago I lived below Smith's field and my wife dug up a workhouse penny in the garden.

 

I was told that people on the way to the workhouse used to call at the miner's cottages on Passhouses Road where they could get a free drink and some bread which was left out for them by Mr Pass the mine owner.

 

From there they would cut over Smithies fields on their way to the Union Workhouse at Fir vale down below.

 

The workhouse token must have been dropped by some unfortunate on his way from there after earning it, working in the workhouse fields or there.

 

I believe they could be exchanged for bread at the workhouse.

 

Love to hear more about this and Smithies Field.

 

Good post, FHain

 

Every year we paid our ground rent to the Duke of Norfolk through his estate office on Staffford Road off City Road.

 

Happy Days! PopT

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[quote=fleetwood;

'Hallcar', many a crisp and lemonade I had in the backyard of that pub on a warm Summer evening out with my parents.

 

I used to take our kids there too when it was warm.

scan0026.jpg

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[quote=fleetwood;

'Hallcar', many a crisp and lemonade I had in the backyard of that pub on a warm Summer evening out with my parents.

 

I used to take our kids there too when it was warm.

scan0026.jpg

i still have many a lemonade in there trev (HIC) did you ever slide down smithies field on cardboard.and am i right in thinking there was also horses on the field.can remember the pigeon huts before they built bicc cables.taffinders had one of the houses that over looked smithies field.

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Trev, did you ever slide down smithies field on cardboard.and am i right in thinking there was also horses on the field?

 

Never went there sheila until after we got married, the Hallcar was my local from 65 to 70, then we came here.

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i still have many a lemonade in there trev (HIC) did you ever slide down smithies field on cardboard.and am i right in thinking there was also horses on the field.can remember the pigeon huts before they built bicc cables.taffinders had one of the houses that over looked smithies field.

 

i remember sliding down the field on cardboard nearly split my difference :hihi::hihi: mi mam almost had a breakdown when she saw the blood 15 stitches and 5 weeks later i were back on cardboard as though nowt had appened:rolleyes::rolleyes:

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(Quote)"Going back up Petre st on the right there was the fusty sweet shop and then on the corner of Sutherland rd and Petre st Fairbrothers tailors, I went to school with Janet Fairbrother.

Tony Wagstaff, John Timmins, Stu Butler, Tony Saccomando, Phillip Gill all good swimmers because of that sadist Mr Scott."

 

I could have sworn Janet's family name was Fairweather, as I went to school with her younger sister Julie. Maybe my mind is playing up. I lived on the same road as John Timmins on Alliance Street before they were demolished, and Stu Butler and his family lived near us on the new Carwood Estate. A real trip down memory lane.

Hi Shelby I used to live at number 84 Petre St right next door to where the tailors were but then it was a fish shop owned by the Cottons.

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I have fond memories of watching cricket at the ground (Smithies Field) just off Petre Street in the 1940s, when I was walking from Newhall to my grandmother's house in Danville Street. It was great fun to stop off and watch, and I think sometimes I even forgot that I was supposed to be on my way to Gran's! I remember Petre Street in those days had a local hero called Hancock, a ginger-haired lad. I think he was a fast bowler, but, anyway, he was a matchwinner on a number of occasions, I'm sure. Just up the road from the ground, there was a corner shop in the window of which there was always a team sheet and details of the next match. I have a feeling that Hancock had some connection with this shop. I wish I could find out more about him, and I winder if there are any of his relatives still around?

Incidentally, the references to Woodhill, a house on the top side of the ground, in fact on Grimesthorpe Road, reminds me that a great uncle of mine was, or so I was told, the occupant of either this house or one close to it. His name was James (Surname) and he was melting shop manager at Firth's in about 1896-1900. He married a woman from Upper Langwith in Derbyshire, and this woman was my grandfather's sister. I remember that when I was told about the Grimesthorpe Road link, I went to look at the house, and, frankly, it didn't seem half as grand as I had imagined it.

------------------------

HI REDFYRE, I TOOK A TRIP AROUND BURNGREAVE AND GRIMESTHORPE

ON WEDNESDAY 24TH NOV. I REALLY DID ENJOY THE DAY OUT.

I WENT ON SMITHS FIELD TO LOOK BACK ON THE GOOD TIMES ,

WE USE TO WATCH CRICKET ON A SUNDAY .

WHEN THEIR WAS`NT A MATCH ON WE WOULD GO FURTHER OVER THE

FIELD WITH MATES, WAIT FOR LASSES TO ARRIVE <<NO WE DID`NT >>.

THEY WOULD BRING THERE RADIO`S AND SIT LISTENING TO THE POP

MUSIC, MUCKING ABOUT--SLIDDING DOWN THEM HILLS ON THE HOT

SUMMERS. GOOD DAYS.

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I have fond memories of watching cricket at the ground (Smithies Field) just off Petre Street in the 1940s, when I was walking from Newhall to my grandmother's house in Danville Street. It was great fun to stop off and watch, and I think sometimes I even forgot that I was supposed to be on my way to Gran's! I remember Petre Street in those days had a local hero called Hancock, a ginger-haired lad. I think he was a fast bowler, but, anyway, he was a matchwinner on a number of occasions, I'm sure. Just up the road from the ground, there was a corner shop in the window of which there was always a team sheet and details of the next match. I have a feeling that Hancock had some connection with this shop. I wish I could find out more about him, and I winder if there are any of his relatives still around?

Incidentally, the references to Woodhill, a house on the top side of the ground, in fact on Grimesthorpe Road, reminds me that a great uncle of mine was, or so I was told, the occupant of either this house or one close to it. His name was James (Surname) and he was melting shop manager at Firth's in about 1896-1900. He married a woman from Upper Langwith in Derbyshire, and this woman was my grandfather's sister. I remember that when I was told about the Grimesthorpe Road link, I went to look at the house, and, frankly, it didn't seem half as grand as I had imagined it.

 

Hello All, in particular RedFyre,

 

I am trying to find out more about about a place my grandfather (Edward Sanderson 1920-2007) used to visit a long time ago and to talk about a lot - Woodhill Hall. The name may be slightly wrong, but "Woodhill" certainly featured, and it was definitely in Sheffield. The family themselves moved to Penistone, probably in the early 1920s. I know very little about Woodhill other than the stories he used to tell my mother, we have tried to trace the location but without success. Apparently a grandparent of his (my great-great-grandfather and mother) lived there. I have very few details, but if anyone has any memories of a place known as Woodhill Hall/Place/House in Sheffield, I would love to hear them.

 

Kind regards,

 

Eleanor Sanderson

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Hi eleanor ....... Regards Woodhill House/Hall could this be the place you are searching for.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=s5+7hq&sll=37.09024,-95.712891&sspn=32.252269,56.601563&ie=UTF8&ll=53.401064,-1.451612&spn=0.011847,0.043945&t=h&z=15&iwloc=A&layer=c&cbll=53.400994,-1.451791&panoid=mSnlMOwGYOFeVPCPAaO_7g&cbp=12,72.74213649948615,,1,3.5937499999999956

as you can see its still standing. You can compare with a old photo at the "Sheffield Libraries" website, here:

http://www.picturesheffield.com/cgi-bin/picturesheffield.pl?_cgifunction=form&_layout=picturesheffield&keyval=sheff.refno=y01133

 

Also there is quite a bit on the "Sheffield History" site at:

http://www.sheffieldhistory.co.uk ....... just put "woodhill" into the search box.

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Hello All, in particular RedFyre,

 

I am trying to find out more about about a place my grandfather (Edward Sanderson 1920-2007) used to visit a long time ago and to talk about a lot - Woodhill Hall. The name may be slightly wrong, but "Woodhill" certainly featured, and it was definitely in Sheffield. The family themselves moved to Penistone, probably in the early 1920s. I know very little about Woodhill other than the stories he used to tell my mother, we have tried to trace the location but without success. Apparently a grandparent of his (my great-great-grandfather and mother) lived there. I have very few details, but if anyone has any memories of a place known as Woodhill Hall/Place/House in Sheffield, I would love to hear them.

 

Kind regards,

 

Eleanor Sanderson

 

Hi Eleanor,

I think that if you look at the references on Sheffield History you will get some answers. It is very interesting to read your comments, for my grandfather's sister lived at Woodhill after marrying Lewis James, who was the melting shop manager at Firth's in the 1890s and up to around 1913. They eventually left Woodhill and moved to live out near Retford, just off the A1.

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