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Ultimately, a child's education is more important than a holiday

A child's education is more important than a holiday  

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  1. 1. A child's education is more important than a holiday



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My daughters last exam results were a little lower than expected, she had her holidays out of term time. She has had to deal with moving house twice over the last six months, we could put her decrease in achievements down to that.

Or we could put it down to the fact she spends most of her out of school hours pretending to be doing lots of homework but in reality sits in her room on the x-box 360 or laptop chatting to her boyfriend.

 

I doubt she's alone there. She and a few hundred thousand other teenagers.

 

 

If you was to ask my daughter, she blames me for her educational failures.

 

Been there!:hihi:

 

Up until my son was about 15, it seems I was 'OK' but suddenly I became the daftest bugger in the universe!

 

Apparently miracles do exist, because when he was 21 I made an amazing recovery. :hihi:

 

 

It's fine just the way it is, don't need to suggest anything other than that.

What would you suggest, parents flogged at the notion of taking their children on affordable holidays.

Lined up against the fence and shot for handing out chip butties.

 

It's not my suggestion - I understand it's the government who are planning on passing a new law. AFAIR, Headmasters have been able to 'report' parents for failing to send their children to school, but it looks as if the government is now going to take that responsibility out of their hands. - Perhaps in response to the many who do claim that 'the education system is failing their children'?

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Education Secretary Michael Gove is to crack down on parents who take children out of school to go on holiday.

 

Headteachers will lose the ability to sanction up to two weeks a year of "authorised absence" during term time, in a new drive to improve attendance rates, according to The Sunday Telegraph.

 

The discretionary absence is intended to cover illness, bad weather and bereavements, but many heads come under pressure to grant it so that children can be taken on holidays at times when it is cheaper.

 

The move, to be accompanied by tougher fines for parents of children who regularly play truant, follows a review of school discipline and attendance by teacher and behaviour expert Charlie Taylor.

 

It is thought that 4.5 million days of schooling are missed by pupils going on holidays, which are often significantly more expensive during school breaks.

 

Brian Lightman, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders representing secondary school heads, said: "The discretionary 10 days has become a bit of a cultural expectation with parents viewing it as a right in some cases. It is not.

 

"Children only have one chance to get their education right and for schools to do their best for pupils, it is essential that children have good attendance. Parents taking children out to go on holiday just to get a good deal is disruptive and makes life very difficult for teachers."

 

A Department for Education spokeswoman said: "This is a leak and we are not commenting on a leak."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/michael-gove-to-ban-termtime-holidays-7196952.html

 

Yeah just read up on it, so let me get this right.

Michael Gove is removing the Headteachers power to grant authorised absence "intended to cover illness, bad weather and bereavements".

And Issuing fines to parents who "regularly play truant".

 

So in English, he's planning on making money out of the cheap holiday industry by charging for the privilege of turning the children into Unauthorised Absentees.

 

It's the asbo effect all over again.

Not to mention kids will use this new found power (more than likely against their parents) and play truant just so that Mary the virgin teenage mother of three can't play bingo with gran on a Friday night. Just 'cos' they can innit.

Edited by Digsy

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Polarisation can be useful in casting the debate.

 

So,

 

Parent A: takes children out of school during term for a holiday.

Parent B: sends children to school during term.

 

If forced to guess,

 

Q1: Which parent would take the most educational holiday?

Q2: Which parent would take the least educational holiday?

 

 

 

 

(Sub parent with carer, grandparent, social worker as required)

 

The polarization ought to be based on something other than prejudice though, maybe some evidence for example... At the moment it doesn't appear that it is.

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What did you learn on holiday that will be more useful in later life than the schooling that you missed?

 

What schooling was missed?

 

Do you remember being at primary school in the week before the summer holidays.

I remember helping to tidy the classroom, taking down displays, sports days and very little (if any) new material being covered. You wouldn't leave any new material to the last week of term before a 6 week break as you'll never have the chance to reinforce it.

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Yeah just read up on it, so let me get this right.

Michael Gove is removing the Headteachers power to grant authorised absence "intended to cover illness, bad weather and bereavements".

And Issuing fines to parents who "regularly play truant".

 

So in English, he's planning on making money out of the cheap holiday industry by charging for the privilege of turning the children into Unauthorised Absentees.

 

It's the asbo effect all over again.

Not to mention kids will use this new found power (more than likely against their parents) and play truant just so that Mary the virgin teenage mother of three can't play bingo with gran on a Friday night. Just 'cos' they can innit.

 

If it's as you suggest then it will have little effect will it. One week of at the start of the summer holidays is not regular truancy and parents don't require the authority of the head teacher to keep their child out of school anyway.

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Petition signed.

 

Surely hard working parents have a ' right ' to take their children on holiday when they can. Not all working parents are able to take holidays during the school holidays, and lets face it most working parents are responsible people who don't abuse the present system.

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then the school would have to have a temporary teacher in place. problem solved

 

Affecting the child's education at all? Surely schools would also need Additional funding to pay for this? Tax rises ok to support it?

 

Teachers especially those in the first years of teaching don't get paid enough to go on holiday every year during the school holidays. Their kids don't get to go on holiday during school time just because it's cheaper.

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My brother has two kids of school age. If they bring this ban in they would never go on holiday as he is only allowed holidays in term time.

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The Department For Education is proposing a ban on taking the children out of school in term time. Headteachers will no longer be able to authorise absence.

 

"Ultimately, a child's education is more important than a holiday" says the general secretary of the National Association of Headteachers in today's Times.

 

Do you agree?

 

What a stupid comment!! Of cause a child's.education is more important than a holiday. Anyone who thinks otherwise is a moron!

 

However, If I.want to take my child on holiday during.g term time, that's up to me! As long as they don't miss exams or coursework deadlines.

 

Removing a child from school for 1/2 weeks a year isn't going to make or break their education!

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Why not do it on a sort of grading system of they are keeping their grades up they can go if not they can't.

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Why not do it on a sort of grading system of they are keeping their grades up they can go if not they can't.

 

Can you imagine if there are several children in a family and all but one does OK?

How are you going to tell the others that they aren't going away !!! Just wouldn't work at all.

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