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Some straight talking advice needed.


Lucyjackson

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I have a 9 year old pedigree large breed dog and for the last few months she has started to urinate and defecate on the floor downstairs :gag:

 

I have had her at the vets countless times and all the vet can tell me is apart from a slightly enlarged heart, her being overweight and a few suspicious lumps on her legs (another story) she is an average old age dog.

 

I have tried hard to be patient and have tried hard to re train her house breaking but it has had absolutely no effect whatsoever, she has plenty of time to go for walks and has ample opportunity to toilet outside but she will wait until she is back inside.

 

She has also started licking the front door as if she wants to go out but when i let her out all she does is stand at the front gate and barks at people as they walk past. She will then come in and as soon as my back is turned either pee or poo on the floor again :rant:

 

We have a new puppy but these issues have far preceded the new dog coming and she gets on well with it.

 

The new pup is fully house trained and has settled in well with her.

 

Luckily we have wooden floors throughout the downstairs so i am able to thoroughly disinfect and cleanse the whole area but i literally cannot go on ike this.

 

I feel like i hate my dog and that makes me sad :(

 

The way i am feeling now is to take her to have her put to sleep but i know in my heart it would be for my benefit and not hers.

 

I know she is old but it is now beginning to draw a wedge between myself and my other half because it really is constantly.

 

I really need straight advice on what to do next before i do something i may regret.

what would you do in my shoes?

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I'm going through a similar set of thought processes with my elderly cat at the moment, so I understand how hard it is to take the choice when you're worrying about whether you're doing the right thing, mainly because there is no such thing as a 'right' thing to do.

 

Is it possible that she's getting a touch of dementia? The loss of routine and toilet training coupled with the not toileting outdoors when she has the opportunity etc does sound awfully like it could be a brain or nerve function thing rather than it having a physical cause.

 

Unfortunately if she does have dementia then there's not a lot that you can do about it, but it may make it easier for you to cope with the fact that she's not doing it because she's being naughty but because she can't help it.

 

You have my sympathies, and I hope you find a way to move forwards with her :)

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I assume dog dementia is similar to human dementia. If it is, then some things will apply and some things will not. My grandad had dementia and there were certain things common to the illness that never applied to him, such as aggression. What I'm saying is that your dog might not tick every box, she might do eventually and it doesn't mean she hasn't got it. If it is like humans, then the sooner you get a diagnosis the better. I'm sure there must be some medication to slow it? Thinking of you both xx

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This isn't dementia, it's your dog being territorial.

 

You have a new pup and your older dog is leaving his mark to tell the pup that he is on HIS territory. They may well get on well together in your eyes, but your older dog is still asserting himself.

 

9 is more middle aged than senior. My dog is 8 and that's what the vet told me - he is middle aged.

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9 is more middle aged than senior. My dog is 8 and that's what the vet told me - he is middle aged.

 

Doesn't it depend on the size and breed though? Some large pedigrees' life expectancies don't exceed 10-12, whereas smaller mongrels can live until 18? I'm not saying its the case every time, but as a general rule of thumb. Therefore demetia must start earlier, especially since this problem started before the pup came along.

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I know you are cleaning the area really well, and I know this might sound like only a tiny thing compared to the problem, but have you tried safe4 odour killer?

No matter how much cleaning of the area you do, the dog will still smell where it has been, even if you bleach it etc.

Safe4 is the only thing I have found that actually neutralises the smell.

After two years of my dog weeing on the kitchen floor and me cleaning it with every household cleaner I could find, I bought a bottle of safe4 disinfectant and a bottle of safe 4 odour killer. They come concentrated so you water them down.

One clean with this and she never did it again (well only once or twice when I left her too log in an evening) but this is in 1 and a half years. It was daily before that.

I'm not saying it will solve your problems but it might be a start.

I think this is a territorial thing too to be honest, and whilstever the dog can still smell the wee, they will still continue. I know the problem was there before the puppy but the puppy arriving has probably made her even more determined. Also, the smell of the puppy on the floor, or little accidents by the puppy will encourage her to do it even more.

I would try that, and then I would also take the dog outside and wait for her to wee etc and not let her back in until she has. Make a big fuss of her etc when she does it outside...as you said, back to basics.

I think that removing the smell completely though with safe4 is certainly worth a try if the alternative is to PTS.

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I know you are cleaning the area really well, and I know this might sound like only a tiny thing compared to the problem, but have you tried safe4 odour killer?

No matter how much cleaning of the area you do, the dog will still smell where it has been, even if you bleach it etc.

Safe4 is the only thing I have found that actually neutralises the smell.

After two years of my dog weeing on the kitchen floor and me cleaning it with every household cleaner I could find, I bought a bottle of safe4 disinfectant and a bottle of safe 4 odour killer. They come concentrated so you water them down.

One clean with this and she never did it again (well only once or twice when I left her too log in an evening) but this is in 1 and a half years. It was daily before that.

I'm not saying it will solve your problems but it might be a start.

I think this is a territorial thing too to be honest, and whilstever the dog can still smell the wee, they will still continue. I know the problem was there before the puppy but the puppy arriving has probably made her even more determined. Also, the smell of the puppy on the floor, or little accidents by the puppy will encourage her to do it even more.

I would try that, and then I would also take the dog outside and wait for her to wee etc and not let her back in until she has. Make a big fuss of her etc when she does it outside...as you said, back to basics.

I think that removing the smell completely though with safe4 is certainly worth a try if the alternative is to PTS.

 

 

We use safe4 all the time and the problem still continues, i don't think its a territorial thing as she has been doing it way before the new pup came and over time her behaviour has changed...

Take for example this evening, she is sat at the side of me now just continually licking her front leg then looking up at me before licking her front leg again...she does this alot.

I have just been upstairs to give the phone to my son and by the time i had got back down she had gone into the dining room and pee'd...this is just after being let in from outside.

 

I am beginning to totally lose my patience with her as it appears she knows what she is doing but does not care :(

Shouting at her is not going to help the situation but everytime she does it(which is several times a day) i have to completely disinfect the room before spraying safe4 again.

 

Its really beginning to get me down :(

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