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Delighted to see University applications down 9%..

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I think its sad that a University Education seems to hold such little value these days. It means our younger generations have a very poor choice when they start out in life.

 

When I was younger, many agencies took you on provided you were prepared to work. Many agencies now expect people to have a degree simply to do work in admin.

Do they? Really?

 

People say "the young should take any job", again the young are hammered with things such as car insurance, and paying bus fare to get to work is getting silly. £6.08 an hour doesn't go very far these days if you have to pay £4000 just for car insurance

A car isn't a requirement

, unless of course you are planning to live with your mum and dad for the rest of your life.

They're probably not planning to be young for the rest of their life, so that car insurance cost will come down.

 

With the "we must get everyone through university" mentality, the quality of the education offered has suffered badly. I studied IT and completed back in 2003, yet I have never worked in an IT role, I did teach IT as thats all I could get.

 

Many young people did Sports Degrees, Sport Science or other very expensive fitness related courses, sadly for these people doing a sports degree and "working in a fitness environment" are two completely different things, and sadly many of these people fell flat on their faces when they found the reality of the fitness industry. (probably in the same way I did after I'd completed my IT education).

 

I do hope that with the increase in fees that the education being offered, matches more closely to what is required to that particular industry. If its simply a case of gaining a piece of paper, then £50,000 debt is simply unjustified.

The IT degree I did got me onto a graduate program with an IT company, but I agree that there are a lot of low value degrees out there and it's largely down to the push to get more people through uni.

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Do you own a Victorian cotton mill.?

 

Oh, a ray of sunshine in the darkness! Thank you banjodeano.:D

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None but what op is trying to say is that students think just because they have a useless peice of paper they are too good to stack shelves just like last week in the news with the student who said she was too good to work at poundland.

 

I don't have a Degree and was once told I was too good to work in Hillsborough Co-Op :rolleyes:

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I'd like to think that going to Uni is more about broadening the mind than getting a good job out of it.

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Do they? Really?

A car isn't a requirement

They're probably not planning to be young for the rest of their life, so that car insurance cost will come down.

The IT degree I did got me onto a graduate program with an IT company, but I agree that there are a lot of low value degrees out there and it's largely down to the push to get more people through uni.

 

I thought an IT degree was a low value degree? Students through the doors = money and since less funding has come from government, universities have had to rely on luring in students and it is the oversea's students which are most profitable.

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What were you basing your thoughts on?

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My partner is a lecturer in business/marketing.She takes classes of up to 400 students,(masters level) Her workload is horrendous! With scant resources,or back-up.

 

Ouch! I'm surprised the Master's students allow the University to get away with that!

 

As I mentioned in my previous post, the undergrad classes were 400 +, but the maximum size of a Master's class was 29 (because there were only 29 students on the course) and the class was often split into two for lectures. Seminar groups were 7 or 8 and if, for some reason, a seminar or lecture was cancelled, there was invariably a complaint from the students. - We're paying for this, it's up to you to provide that which you contracted to provide!

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I'd like to think that going to Uni is more about broadening the mind than getting a good job out of it.

 

 

 

I think you need to have very rich parents if thats the reason for going to university. If money is no object, then YES - university is about broadening the mind.

 

Sadly though for the majority, then aim is to get a decent job at the end of the 3 years

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They could, but it wouldn't be a foundation year then as non of the students could have maths any more advanced than a-level (do they still do s papers, I took a couple)

What were the entry criteria then, A* maths a level as a minimum (and they struggled) anyone else would need the foundation year for extra maths work.

 

I've no idea what the entrance requirements were. - I doubt they could be higher than A*.

 

It may be that although the additional year was described as a 'Foundation' year, it went rather further than that.

 

I was surprised when my son told me that students with A* were struggling. - And he was very glad he'd done the additional year. That additional year increased the overall cost considerably, but he thinks it was well-worth doing.

 

Presumably, if a pattern of 'struggling students' emerges, the University will have to consider extending the course by an additional year for everybody. I very much doubt that they would consider 'dumbing down' the course.

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I thought an IT degree was a low value degree? Students through the doors = money and since less funding has come from government, universities have had to rely on luring in students and it is the oversea's students which are most profitable.

 

 

I think that depends on which IT degree you do and where you do it. Not all universities are equal.

 

Many universities rely heavily on foreign students and have done so for the last 15-20 years. Few universities have financial resources which would allow them to ignore foreign students.

 

Here's part of the information for foreign students published by one university:

 

在英国学习

如果你想在英国的顶尖大学学习并且获得一个优秀的学历,那就应该选择报读牛津布鲁克斯大学。 我们是一所活跃于国际拥有良好信誉的公立大学,始创于1865年,前身为牛津艺术学校。在20世纪里,我校迅速发展成为英国领先的现代化大学,在英国报纸的大学排行榜里一直保持高排名,同时我们也立誓成为世界上最好的大学之一。

 

 

研究与教学

奖学金,英语课程和支持学生

了解更多...

牛津布鲁克斯大学历史 - 英国牛津布鲁克斯大学的完整历史 。

细节和成绩 - 更多关于我们的细节和成就。

位置 - 了解更多有关在英国生活和牛津生活。

中国学生入学要求

签证问题 - 了解学习签证 。

牛津图片 - 从图片中了解牛津更多 。

牛津大学图书馆 - 我们许多学生都使用牛津大学图书馆 (Bodleian Library)。

 

(AFAIK, it's also available in English.)

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If it's a year that practically everyone needs then it's not really the same as a normal foundation year.

The norm is that a foundation year is to bring students who don't meet the criteria (but are still wanted by the university) up to the level they need to join the course.

It might be someone who hasn't done one of the required subjects but has demonstrated that they have the capability for example.

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I think that depends on which IT degree you do and where you do it. Not all universities are equal.

Indeed.

I didn't make the grade to study computer science at Cambridge, but I did study it at a university with a good reputation in the subject and generally.

One of the 'plate glass' universities.

 

It did the job anyway, which is to get you a job, within a few years of starting work the degree becomes largely irrelevant and it's all about experience.

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