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Getting rid of mould and mildew on pvc windows

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It's very unlikely that your house has no air bricks at all, but they may be under floor level or hidden by cupboards or similar. Blocked up chimneys often have an air brick in them too. There are air bricks on the front wall under floor level in my house, and in the kitchen behind 2 of the cupboards.

 

You can enhance ventilation whether you have air bricks or not though, by:

 

leaving windows open where possible, if only on the 'ventilation setting' that most modern windows have,

 

not drying laundry on racks or radiators around the house unless you have the window open and a fan directing the air to the open window,

 

taking care when cooking to always put the lid on pans and open the kitchen window when draining things which have been boiled or steamed,

 

also opening the window if you empty the dishwasher or tumble dryer- you'd be amazed how much steam is released,

 

ventilating bathrooms very carefully after showers or baths.

 

 

You could have a check on the relative humidity levels by buying a hygrometer which is intended for use in insect and snake tanks. Well ventilated homes generally run at about 40-50% humidity in the air. Much more than that and you're at risk of mould, algae and damp issues. My thermometer and hygrometer cost only a fiver.

 

Thanks i'll get one of them!

do you think a humidifer would also help!

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since me and my husband had the cavity wall insulation done we have experienced mould on the window sills, windows and walls dont know if its connected in some way :suspect:

 

You should buy a dehunidifier. They are very cheap and pay for themselves very quickly by releasing heat rescued from water vapour.

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That's a bit drastic.

Apart from the draught, can't the neighbours see in.:hihi:

 

We like fresh air, bit of a bugger when it rains though :(

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If it's private rented hun, you need to contact the landlord, damp proofing is there resonsablilty...... you should'nt be living like that.....

 

 

It is easy to blame the landlord but a lot of mould is down to a lack of ventilation. Old 9" solid wall houses was not built for todays way of living. They had air bricks and chimneys which created a flow of air.

 

Today we seal off all ventilation, create heat and moisture and that moisture cannot escape so it will condense an a cold spot. Ventilation can be created but it takes discipline and a good sense of timing. Not all residents can be bothered so blame it on someone else.

 

Personally, my advise is move out and avoid the old solid wall houses. They are cold and cost a fortune in heating costs. Otherwise create heat, insulation and ventilation if you know how and can afford it.

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Just remembered this, I went to a seminar about black mould and there is a company called Envirovent that makes a unit that elimates black mould. The more sealed off the house is the better it works. Costs about £700 fitted and is about 4p a day to run. The company guarantees no more mould. Ideal for the lazy who cannot open windows or the landlord who is fed up of nagging tenants.

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It is easy to blame the landlord but a lot of mould is down to a lack of ventilation. Old 9" solid wall houses was not built for todays way of living. They had air bricks and chimneys which created a flow of air.

 

Today we seal off all ventilation, create heat and moisture and that moisture cannot escape so it will condense an a cold spot. Ventilation can be created but it takes discipline and a good sense of timing. Not all residents can be bothered so blame it on someone else.

 

Personally, my advise is move out and avoid the old solid wall houses. They are cold and cost a fortune in heating costs. Otherwise create heat, insulation and ventilation if you know how and can afford it.

 

Mine is an old solid brick house and it's lovely and warm. We have the heating on for a couple of hours to warm the house up in the morning and maybe in the evening if the internal temperature starts to drop.

 

We do have double glazing which has reduced the heating bill enormously, but we also have several air bricks and ventilate the house carefully and the only hint of mould we ever had was when there was a problem with the guttering. Once that was sorted we haven't had an issue.

 

Like every type of house, the house itself has needs and as long as you meet those then you're fine.

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Thanks i'll get one of them!

do you think a humidifer would also help!

 

Dehumidifiers can help, as can the moisture traps that you can buy from all sorts of places which use a hygroscopic mineral to dry the air. They are particularly useful for drying out cupboards and the like.

 

However, neither of these are going to be much help long term if you don't also work out how to produce less humidity in the house.

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Bleach is by far the best product against fungi, i.e. molds.

 

Its also the main ingredient in most of those mould sprays so its much cheaper just to make your own up. Copper sulphate can also be used/added and is also the active ingredient in anti-mould wallpaper paste.

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